Since the ingredients are eggs and cream cheese, and the recipe for scrambled eggs or an omelette is eggs and cream or milk, which is almost the same, the taste is going to be eggy. Adding gluten,which has no taste, is not going to change the flavor. I thought it might change the texture, but it didn’t do that either. How it’s mixed, baked, or simmered isn’t going to change the flavor either.
Congratulations on your keto success! i started keto on September 2, 2017 after reaching my highest weight ever of 192. As of this morning, I’ve lost 50 pounds, weighing 142. I’ve struggled with weight my entire life, & never thought I would be this size or weigh this little. I have never felt better! My hormones are stabilized (I’m 60, so I have the perimenopausal thing going on); my acid reflux is almost completely gone; my arthritis symptoms are gone; I’m sleeping MUCH better; and my skin isn’t dry! I started keto for weight loss, but now I know the weight loss is a perk. I’m never “hangry” and have been able to incorporate 24 – 48 hour fasting into my weekly regime with no difficulty. I do intermittent fasting every day, eating all my food in 8 – 12 hours daily. My “food obsession” is gone; yet, I love eating more than I ever did pre-keto! I eat only when I’m hungry (not by a clock) and stop when I’m satisfied. I agree that a lot of docs still are not on board with keto. A great book to understand keto from a medical perspective is Jimmy Moore’s Keto Clarity. I think the reason some people don’t do well on keto is they have a difficult time embracing the idea of eating “this much fat”. Happily, I’m an “all or nothing” person, so when I started keto, I jumped in – and found that the fat fills me up faster & keeps me full longer so I don’t have cravings. When I do want something sweet, I make a keto treat – but it’s not every day or even every week. Most of the time, I’m super happy on my bacon, sour cream, cream cheese,and fattier meats! I am keto for life – there is no reason to go back to eating any other way!
Participants returned every other week for 16 weeks for further diet counseling and medication adjustment. When a participant neared half the weight loss goal or experienced cravings, he or she was advised to increase carbohydrate intake by approximately 5 g per day each week as long as weight loss continued. Participants could choose 5 g carbohydrate portions from one of the following foods each week: salad vegetables, low-carbohydrate vegetables, hard or soft cheese, nuts, or low-carbohydrate snacks. Diabetes medication adjustment was based on twice daily glucometer readings and hypoglycemic episodes, while diuretic and other anti-hypertensive medication adjustments were based on orthostatic symptoms, blood pressure, and lower extremity edema.
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
Another option is to decrease the intake of carbohydrates slowly, over a few weeks, to minimize side effects. But the “Nike way” (Just Do It) may be the best choice for most people. Removing most sugar and starch often results in several pounds lost on the scale within a few days. This may be mostly fluids, but it can still be great for motivation.
In this single-arm, 4-month diet intervention, an LCKD resulted in significant improvement of glycemia, as measured by fasting glucose and hemoglobin A1c, in patients with type 2 diabetes. More importantly, this improvement was observed while diabetes medications were reduced or discontinued in 17 of the 21 participants, and were not changed in the remaining 4 participants. Participants also experienced reductions in body weight, waist circumference, and percent body fat but these improvements were moderate and did not predict the change in hemoglobin A1c in regression analyses.

Fat is an important energy source; however, it plays a secondary role as an energy substrate, particularly during exercise that exceeds moderate intensity. For example, one of the fundamental concepts of bioenergetics illustrates this point through the axiom “fat burns in a carbohydrate flame;” clearly emphasizing the important role of CHO in energy metabolism. In the absence of adequate CHO availability, as might occur during starvation, near the end of a long endurance event or CHO-restricting diet, the body must turn to an alternate source to maintain energy for all tissues. Under normal dietary conditions there is a steady supply of glucose which the body readily uses as a primary fuel.
Similar to our results, three studies noted that diabetes medications were reduced in some participants[6,8,9], although details were provided in only one study. We also discontinued diuretic medications during diet initiation because of concern for additional diuresis incurred by the diet. This concern was based on the theoretical effects of the diet [17], observed effects of the diet on body water by bioelectric impedance [18], and practical experience with the diet [19]. Until we learn more about using low carbohydrate diets, medical monitoring for hypoglycemia, dehydration, and electrolyte abnormalities is imperative in patients taking diabetes or diuretic medications.
If you're in search of carb-free noodles that perfectly mimic the taste and texture of regular spaghetti -- a true miracle -- keep looking. Like pasta, shirataki noodles are mostly neutral in flavor and can absorb the tastes you cook with. But, shirataki has a slimier consistency and you won't be able to choose the hardness of your pasta -- al dente or otherwise -- because the noodles are already "cooked."
^ Freeman JM, Vining EP, Pillas DJ, Pyzik PL, Casey JC, Kelly LM. The efficacy of the ketogenic diet—1998: a prospective evaluation of intervention in 150 children. Pediatrics. 1998 Dec;102(6):1358–63. doi:10.1542/peds.102.6.1358. PMID 9832569. https://web.archive.org/web/20040629224858/http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/press/1998/DECEMBER/981207.HTM Lay summary]—JHMI Office of Communications and Public Affairs. Updated 7 December 1998. Cited 6 March 2008.
The central aim of the ketogenic diet is to push the body into a state of ketosis, where metabolism shifts from burning carbohydrates as the primary energy source to fat, or “ketone bodies.” These ketones are a special type of fat that serve as cellular “superfuel.” In order to achieve ketosis, one must consume a diet high in healthy fats and dramatically lower in sugar and carbohydrates. This allows blood sugar to drop to the point that glucose is significantly less available to the body to burn as a source of fuel. In the absence of glucose, the body shifts its focus to ketones for energy production. Ketosis not only burns fat—which supports weight loss and BMI reduction if in a calorie deficit—it also transitions the body’s energy source to what clearly turns out to be a better fuel. In fact, energy derived from burning fat is associated with a remarkable reduction in the amount of damaging free radicals in the body, in comparison to burning sugar.
For patients who benefit, half achieve a seizure reduction within five days (if the diet starts with an initial fast of one to two days), three-quarters achieve a reduction within two weeks, and 90% achieve a reduction within 23 days. If the diet does not begin with a fast, the time for half of the patients to achieve an improvement is longer (two weeks), but the long-term seizure reduction rates are unaffected.[44] Parents are encouraged to persist with the diet for at least three months before any final consideration is made regarding efficacy.[9]

FRUITS: Don't choose fruit juices—you're just paying someone to take the fiber out of your food. Instead, eat the fruit itself, and get 3.1 grams of fiber. You can get a serious fiber bang for your carb buck with berries (a half cup of raspberries adds 4 fiber grams, blackberries add 3.8 and blueberries or strawberries add 1.7) and kiwis (2.7 grams per fruit). Always accompany fruit with protein and/or fat such as nuts or cheese to slow any negative impact of the natural sugars on blood-sugar levels.
Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
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