I am so excited to have found your blog. I have been doing the low carb thing myself to lose weight and get more healthy for 4 months(and it’s working really well). But once I’ve finished losing the weight, I want to maintain a lower carb lifestyle for myself and my family. But by lower, I mean maybe 50-80 net carbs a day. I want to include yeast bread on occasion, beans, etc. But I’ve been looking for a LOWER carb yeast bread. I don’t have any restrictions which would exclude gluten, dairy, meat, nuts, etc. I normally make homemade whole wheat bread for my kids from freshly ground wheat (I grind myself). Do you have any recipes that are lower carb than regular whole wheat bread, but wouldn’t necessarily be low enough to fit a 20-30 net carb/day diet. I find that making changes a little at a time works very well with a family and myself. I’d like to take a regular whole wheat bread and tweak it to lower the carbs without greatly sacrificing taste. Also need to learn more on soaking and sprouting to get past the problem of phytates & other anti-nutrients. I am totally willing to do that. Anything you can share or suggestions of recipes to try greatly appreciated! I’ve tried searching “lower carb yeast whole wheat bread” on google or including the word gluten, then I get all the gluten free vegan recipes and so forth that are really low carb, just no luck until now!
However, replacing high carb flours like all-purpose flour, wheat flour, corn flour, and rice flour with low-carb flour is not as simple as just using one for the other. Due to the difference in composition between high-carb and low-carb flours, you will need to use different amounts of low-carb flour together with other essential ingredients that you don’t typically find in traditional baking recipes like psyllium husk, xanthan gum, and protein powder.

While CHO is almost universally regarded as necessary for both health and athletic performance, many studies have called into question the absolute necessity of dietary CHO. As early as 1930 there was evidence demonstrating the efficacy of long-term CHO restriction (14). In an audacious attempt to demonstrate proof-of-concept, arctic explorers Dr. Viljalmur Stefansson and K. Anderson, agreed to participate in a study that involved one year of eating a diet that consisted solely of “meat.” The diet, which consisted of beef, pork, lamb, and chicken, also included significant portions of animal fat, as well as organ meat. This dietary regimen yielded a macronutrient distribution of approximately 81% fat, 18% protein and 1% CHO, over the course of 375 days. The subjects experienced a modest reduction in weight, which occurred during the first week; there were no restrictions on food portions, subjects ate to satisfy appetite. Interestingly, the researchers noted no vitamin deficiencies, no significant change in mental alertness or physical impairment, or any other deficit attributed to eating a high fat, all-meat diet.
Providing additional support Paoli et al. (17) examined the effect of a modified KD diet (~55% fat, 41% protein, and 4.5% CHO) on performance and body composition in gymnasts. In a crossover design, researchers compared independent 30-day dietary regimens consisting of “normal diet” (WD; 46.8% CHO, 38.5% fat, and 14.7% protein) and modified KD in nine elite male gymnasts. There were no significant changes from pre to post during either dietary intervention for measures of physical performance, indicating the absence of significant dietary CHO did not negatively impact physical ability. The post-KD measurements, however, saw a significant decrease in fat mass (pre: 5.3; post:
After trying literally DOZENS of Keto bread recipes, I have FINALLY found something I can use as a burger bun! Other recipes were great for biscuits or rolls and such, but didn’t work for a burger bun – and SO EASILY! I added a tiny bit of garlic powder and topped them with TJ Everything Bagel spice, baked them in a muffin top pan and they are AWESOME! Finally – after all this time having to have my cheeseburger without a bun – last night I had a burger AND a bun! Woohoo!!! Next time I will try adding some yeast, just for the flavor. THANK YOU SO MUCH for the GREAT recipe!!!
Carbohydrates are a good source of quick energy to fuel your body's natural functions and keep you going during busy days. They have gotten a bad reputation in the fitness and weight-loss worlds, though, because many typical carbs that people take in are starchy, sugary, salty and contain no useful nutrition. Choose the right kind of low-carb cereal and you can enjoy a quick and convenient breakfast or snack entirely guilt-free.
The benefits above are the most common ones. But there are others that are potentially even more surprising and – at least for some people – life changing. Did you know that a keto diet can help treat high blood pressure, may result in less acne, may help control migraine, might help with certain mental health issues and could have a few other potential benefits?
Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show specific very-low-carb diets help people with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Researchers are also studying the effects of these diets on acne, cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and nervous system diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Lou Gehrig's disease.

The most commonly known and used nut flour is almond flour, and it is one of the most versatile low carb ingredients. Almond flour can differ greatly between brands in terms of how finely ground it is, so you need to know what to look for. The finest almond flours are made from blanched almonds and have no darker specks of skin. Almond “meal” is often not nearly so finely ground and may or may not contain the husks of the almonds. The finer the grind of the almond flour, the finer the consistency of your baked goods. However, more coarsely ground meals are often less expensive and are still useful in things that don’t require a fine texture, such as muffins.
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I’m afraid I don’t. I have never used peanut flour and would hate to guess a conversion for you. And as you may know, almond flour and coconut flour are completely different beasts so are used completely differently to one another. If you are about to throw it away anyway, maybe try experimenting with it, you have nothing to lose (other than some eggs and butter perhaps).
"The keto diet is primarily used to help reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures in children. While it also has been tried for weight loss, only short-term results have been studied, and the results have been mixed. We don't know if it works in the long term, nor whether it's safe," warns registered dietitian Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital.

A systematic review in 2018 looked at 16 studies on the ketogenic diet in adults. It concluded that the treatment was becoming more popular for that group of patients, that the efficacy in adults was similar to children, the side effects relatively mild. However, many patients gave up with the diet, for various reasons, and the quality of evidence inferior to studies on children. Health issues include high levels of low-density lipoprotein, high total cholesterol, and weight loss.[24]


Despite “cereal” being often associated with “carbs,” these days there are plenty of low carb cereals available. Remember that milk has naturally occurring sugars, which are carbs, so be sparing in how much milk you put on your cereal if you want to cut even more carbs. You can also opt for hot cereals – plain oatmeal is actually one of the best whole grain, low carb choices out there – if you do not like plain cereal and milk. The five brands above provide particularly good options in their low carb counts along with high fiber and protein. Head to your nearest supermarket today to find some great low carb cereals!

Children who discontinue the diet after achieving seizure freedom have about a 20% risk of seizures returning. The length of time until recurrence is highly variable, but averages two years. This risk of recurrence compares with 10% for resective surgery (where part of the brain is removed) and 30–50% for anticonvulsant therapy. Of those who have a recurrence, just over half can regain freedom from seizures either with anticonvulsants or by returning to the ketogenic diet. Recurrence is more likely if, despite seizure freedom, an electroencephalogram shows epileptiform spikes, which indicate epileptic activity in the brain but are below the level that will cause a seizure. Recurrence is also likely if an MRI scan shows focal abnormalities (for example, as in children with tuberous sclerosis). Such children may remain on the diet longer than average, and children with tuberous sclerosis who achieve seizure freedom could remain on the ketogenic diet indefinitely.[46]


I am post menopause and I did lose about 40 lbs. Then I stalled and stalled. I was too hot all the time and was having sleep issues. I added more carbs and was better. I attempted keto/ low carb again in January. Two weeks in I had the same symptoms. It is not uncommon. It works well for some but not for me and a few of the other women at my gym. I liked what I was eating and I stuck to it through the stall but no. With the guidance of my trainer I have modified it, lost weight and feel great. Sleep helps!
Almond flour is a gluten-free nut flour that should consist of nothing but ground blanched almonds. This means that you can make your own at home, from scratch, by grinding whole blanched almonds to a fine meal (unless you just want to buy it). Using a coffee or spice grinder usually works best. Be careful not to grind them for too long or the nuts will release their fat and you´ll end up with almond butter, which is a great tasting nut butter but perhaps not what you were going for when making almond flour.
Flaxseed meal is the star of this recipe and with good reason. Registered Nurse Tana Amen, RN says, “Compared to other plants, flaxseed (but not oil) is extremely rich in compounds called ligands, which have antioxidant and plant estrogen properties. Flaxseed-derived ligands have been shown to reduce blood sugar and may also help combat some forms of cancer.”
A Cochrane systematic review in 2018 found and analysed eleven randomized controlled trials of ketogenic diet in people with epilepsy for whom drugs failed to control their seizures.[2] Six of the trials compared a group assigned to a ketogenic diet with a group not assigned to one. The other trials compared types of diets or ways of introducing them to make them more tolerable.[2] In the largest trial of the ketogenic diet with a non-diet control[16], nearly 38% of the children and young people had half or fewer seizures with the diet compared 6% with the group not assigned to the diet. Two large trials of the Modified Atkins Diet compared to a non-diet control had similar results, with over 50% of children having half or fewer seizures with the diet compared to around 10% in the control group.[2]

In addition, on the day the diet was initiated, diabetes medications were reduced – generally, insulin doses were halved, and sulfonylurea doses were halved or discontinued. Due to the possible diuretic effects of the diet soon after initiation, diuretic medications were discontinued if of low dosage (up to 25 mg of hydrochlorothiazide or 20 mg of furosemide) or halved if of higher dosage. Participants were also instructed to take a standard multivitamin and drink 6–8 glasses of water daily, and were encouraged to exercise aerobically for 30 minutes at least three times per week.


If no food processor is at hand, you can also do it by hand (it just takes a little more time and arm muscle!). Add all the dry ingredients to a large bowl and whisk until thoroughly combined. Pour in vinegar and whisk until thoroughly distributed. Pour in egg while whisking vigorously and keep whisking until the dough becomes too stiff to whisk. Using your hands, knead the dough until thoroughly incorporated, adding a teaspoon of water at a time as needed (we use 2). 
Health's contributing nutrition editor Cynthia Sass, RD, MPH, suggests looking for cereals that are made with nuts, seeds, coconut, a little bit of fruit, natural sweetener (think honey or agave syrup) instead of added sugar, and spices for flavor. Although many of these cereals may be gluten- or grain-free, you can also look for flaked whole grain varieties.
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