Because the ketogenic diet alters the body's metabolism, it is a first-line therapy in children with certain congenital metabolic diseases such as pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) deficiency and glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome,[35] which prevent the body from using carbohydrates as fuel, leading to a dependency on ketone bodies. The ketogenic diet is beneficial in treating the seizures and some other symptoms in these diseases and is an absolute indication.[36] However, it is absolutely contraindicated in the treatment of other diseases such as pyruvate carboxylase deficiency, porphyria, and other rare genetic disorders of fat metabolism.[9] Persons with a disorder of fatty acid oxidation are unable to metabolise fatty acids, which replace carbohydrates as the major energy source on the diet. On the ketogenic diet, their bodies would consume their own protein stores for fuel, leading to ketoacidosis, and eventually coma and death.[37]
One of the easiest traps to fall into when starting a ketogenic diet is the assumption that all fats are healthy. It is not uncommon to see new adherents loading up their plates with industrially harvested bacon, exclaiming, “I’m keto, so it’s healthy!” In reality, because ketosis repositions ketones as your primary fuel source, ensuring you consume healthy fats becomes even more important on the ketogenic diet.
The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]
Ketogenic cereals can be a bit of a challenge, so why not try out this blueberry one! It is crunchy and delicious and has all the slow release energy you will need to get through the morning. This makes a great after-school snack for kids and helps them get away from sugary snacks. If you like this one you could experiment with other flavors – for example, try cherry extract instead of blueberry!
Yancy WS Jr, Westman EC, McDuffie JR, Grambow SC, Jeffreys AS, Bolton J, Chalecki A, Oddone EZ, “A randomized trial of a low-carbohydrate diet vs orlistat plus a lowfat diet for weight loss,” Arch Intern Med. 2010 Jan 25;170(2):136-45. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20101008?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=2.
Overall, to get a good nutrition calculation (1) weigh all dry ingredients instead of volumetric (go try and weigh a cup of pecans, pour it out, try again, etc; you will see you probably have around 10% variance, and that variance skyrockets when you start talking about smaller quantities like 1/4 cup due to how the nuts pack in); (2) add all the ingredients into your recipe calculator of choice (I use mynetdiary.com, but YMMV); (3) weigh the final result out to find a total weight of results; (4) divide that weight by the number of servings, to see what weight your servings should be. You could also get a volumetric measure of servings after that just for fun, but see above about volumetric measures of dry goods (especially chunky, variably sized dry goods like this).
Once you start eating this very low amount of carbs, you’re body will become keto adapted. You are starving it from the carbs therefore it needs to find a source of fuel. When you’re in ketosis, your body will no longer have the carbs it once used to fuel your body. It will have to resort to using your own body fat for fuel. This is amazing because you’ll lose body fat if that was your goal and many other benefits you’ll see below.

Fat: Most of the calories in a ketogenic diet come from fat, which is used for energy. The exact amount of fat a person needs to eat will depend on carbohydrate and protein intake, how many calories they use during the day, and whether they are losing weight (using their body fat for energy). Depending on these factors, somewhere in the range of 60 to 80 percent of calories will come from fats on a ketogenic diet (even up to 90 percent on, for example, the Ketogenic Diet for Epilepsy). People tend not to overeat on diets this high in fat, so calorie counting is rarely necessary.


Thanks for your quick reply. Yes, BP is fresh. My batter wasn’t runny either. In fact I was going to add some more liquid but decided to leave as it was. The only other thing it could have been is that I live at 5100′ elevation and it was cold and snowing the day I made them. I am going to make them again and see what happens. I am not giving up! 🙂
Granola can be used as a breakfast dish or as a source of energy to snack on during the day, especially if you take part in sports and need a bit of a boost. This low carb version makes a lovely crunchy breakfast cereal but it also a great topping for yogurt or ketogenic ice cream. This granola can be stored in an airtight container for up to two weeks.
Thanks for this inputs. 20 years ago I gain 17 pounds a year for 5 years. I was healthy but my dr told me start diet, any diet just come back in a month I want to see you start loosing… I started Atkins and lost 7 pound in a month. She was checking my progress every six months and checking my condition. I lost 64 pounds in 3 years. Now I started eating out of control. I am eating healthy but too much… I gain 40 pound back after 20 years. Now I will start again my Atkins to take off 30 pounds…
Goday A, Bellido D, Sajoux I, Crujeiras AB, Burguera B, García-Luna PP, Oleaga A, Moreno B, Casanueva FF. Short-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of a very low-calorie-ketogenic diet interventional weight loss program versus hypocaloric diet in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Nutr Diabetes. 2016 Sep 19;6(9):e230. [PMC free article: PMC5048014] [PubMed: 27643725]
With the help of keto-friendly ingredients, you can easily make yourself some delicious, fluffy pancakes. There are, in fact, several ways to make fantastic keto pancakes, but our favorite is the Faux “Buckwheat” Pancakes made with almond flour and flaxseed meal. Try them for yourself if you want low-carb pancakes that taste just like the real thing.
Just found your website! What an incredible help it is for me. I just converted to a low carb diet a couple of weeks ago, and must admit began struggling with some of the foods we love as a family and didn’t want to give up. Plus the information about almond flour increasing inflammation was eye opening. I have both rheumatoid and osteo – arthrits and recently it has really acted up. Now I know why. I will use coconut four more now! Thank you.
These tasty mini burgers are perfect for parties because they can feed your low carb AND carb-loving guests and no one will even miss that bread. Make them for tailgating parties, game day parties, summer picnics, or just a fun weeknight dinner for the family. Once you dip those little burger bites in that special sauce you’re going to be going back for seconds!
After going low-carb, I was resigned to never eating a satisfactory brownie ever again. And then... I made these brownies. Holy smokes! I followed the directions on the back for the fudgy brownies and they were everything I wanted in a brownie (basically a low carb version of what I used to get from those Gihardelli high carb mixes from Costco) AND sugar free/low carb!
Even if you don’t like the taste of coconut, you may still want to try baking with coconut flour, as the strong taste can actually be masked well with other strong flavors. I find that vanilla, chocolate, and cocoa powder are good additions to help mask the coconut taste for sweet recipes. For savory items, add a little garlic or onion powder. Enhance other flavors with herbs, spices and extracts, and I think you will find you can still enjoy the end result.
5. Ciao Carb: Like Carba-Nada, there are still plenty of carbs in this pasta, but fewer than traditional pasta, at 17 grams per serving after subtracting the fiber. Made with a variety of soy, gluten, wheat, and egg, in my opinion these don’t come anywhere near the wholesomeness of the bean pasta varieties at the top of this list. But if you’re looking for something that looks like pasta and tastes like pasta, without quite as much carby-boom, this will do it for you!

Hi Maya. I LOVE your site!! Interesting, informative with fab recipes and ideas. Hubby and I have just started eating low carb and I have to say, we are not finding it too difficult and I already feel sooo much better!! I find the hardest part is choosing low carb veg, I feel as if we are not eating enough. Any suggestions on how to get more veggies into our diet?

A creamy, cheesy alternative to typical mac and cheese, it’s not a stretch to think this version is preferable to using elbow pasta, no matter what your relationship with carbs may be. Boil cauliflower, whisk up a cheese sauce, and throw it all in the oven. For a fancier twist, use your favorite non-cheddar cheeses or a combo (mozzarella and pepper jack, anyone?)
Baking with coconut flour is a little tricky since it absorbs a lot of water. For every 1 cup of coconut flour, you'll need to add 1 cup of water and six eggs. Substitute 1/4 to 1/3 cups of coconut flour for every 1 cup of all-purpose flour. Another option is a blend of 3 parts almond flour to 1 part coconut flour. Coconut flour is a little higher-carb than nut or seed flours with 16 grams of carbohydrates per 1/4 cup. 

For those wanting paleo donuts, some people are okay with erythritol since it’s a natural sweetener. If you aren’t, you can make these with coconut sugar if that’s more paleo-friendly for you. They just won’t be low carb or sugar-free, but will be paleo. If you just need gluten-free but don’t care about the sugar-free part, try gluten-free cinnamon sugar donuts.

Hi John, Thank you for the feedback. Sometimes this bread takes a little more effort to rise and the batter has to be mixed well to create air bubbles. Use very fresh baking powder, too. The bluish tint can come from an interaction with the psyllium husk powder, and the brand I use (linked on the recipe card) doesn’t usually do this, but either way it’s safe to eat. I’m glad you still liked it!


Shirataki noodles are available in many shapes -- spaghetti, fettucini, macaroni -- and can be purchased plain. Products like Miracle Noodle and NoOodle Noodles sell this type, which tends to be extra-slippery, nutritionally void (they are mostly made up of water) and close to calorie-free. Other brands, like House Foods and Nasoya's Pasta Zero blend the yam flour with tofu or chickpeas, which adds just a few calories and grams of carbohydrates and fiber.

If you're in search of carb-free noodles that perfectly mimic the taste and texture of regular spaghetti -- a true miracle -- keep looking. Like pasta, shirataki noodles are mostly neutral in flavor and can absorb the tastes you cook with. But, shirataki has a slimier consistency and you won't be able to choose the hardness of your pasta -- al dente or otherwise -- because the noodles are already "cooked."
While low-carb simply describes a vague behavior pattern that is subject to each person, ketosis is an objective and measurable fat-burning state of the human body. It is when the body’s metabolism switches gears to burn fat for energy instead of sugar. It is this metabolic state in which people experience the full benefits of a ketogenic lifestyle.

The ketosis produced by fasting or limiting carbohydrate intake does not have negative effects for most people once the body has adapted to that state. The ketosis caused by diet has been referred to as dietary ketosis, physiological ketosis, benign dietary ketosis (Atkins), and, most recently, nutritional ketosis (Phinney and Volek), in an attempt to clear up possible confusion with diabetic ketoacidosis.


Hi Lee, A blender might also work, if it’s powerful enough to chop up nuts. You’ll still want to use a pulse-stop-pulse method, and may need to stir between pulses. Otherwise, you can also try chopping up the nuts and seeds before mixing with the other ingredients. If you go that route, the resulting granola texture will be a little different compared to a food processor. I used a food processor partly because it makes both prep time and cleanup a lot faster, but also because that way you get a mix of larger chopped nuts and finer powder. I hope one of the other methods works out for you!
Yes, nuts can be seen as antiinflammatory when eaten whole and in small amounts, the problem with much of low-carb baking is the huge quantity of almonds you can easily consume in just one slice of cake/pie/cookie. 1 cup almond flour = 90 almonds, and I don’t think many would sit and consume 90 almonds, but it’s easy to overeat almond baking so I am developing recipes with either almond flour or coconut flour to mix things up. This is a great article explaining why we can enjoy nuts, but be cautious of which type and how much. Nuts have become readily accessible too often and eaten it too larger quantities. Nibbling on a few isn’t going to be a problem and probably beneficial.

Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.
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