Taste is quite eggy; I have issues with the smell and taste of eggs (I usually hurl immediately). I was hoping this would be more noodle than egg 🙁 This being said; I simmered it in a broth (2 pkgs beef OXO, 2 tsps garlic powder, 1/2 tsp pepper; 1/8 tsp sirracha; 2 tsps oregano and about 2 a cup and half of water). Then I added some shaved beef that I had fried with orions and garlic – Like a makeshift PHO; Its tastes pretty amazing; but I can still only eat it in little bis because the noodles are still quite eggy :/ I would NOT make this recipe without a silicone mat and don’t spread the mixture all the way to the edges if the mat fits your Ian exactly or it will run under it as the mixture is VERY thin, definetly not the traditional sense of “batter”. I cooked for exactly 5 mins, it will look like it isn’t done, but trust the recepie, it is done. I used a spatula to slowly peel it off piece by piece; there was quite a bit of breakage, so don’t expect to get long noodles, but if you are careful you can definetly get a decent noodle. Overall a good recipe, just not one for someone who doesn’t particularly like eggs.
Several recent studies indicate that a low-carbohydrate diet is effective at improving glycemia. A few studies have shown that in non-diabetic individuals, low-carbohydrate diets were more effective than higher carbohydrate diets at improving fasting serum glucose [13,14] and insulin [6,14-16], and at improving insulin sensitivity as measured by the homeostasis model [6]. One of these studies also included diabetic patients and noted a comparative improvement in hemoglobin A1c after 6 months (low fat diet: 0.0 ± 1.0%; low carbohydrate diet: -0.6 ± 1.2%, p = 0.06) [6] and 12 months (low fat diet: -0.1 ± 1.6%; low carbohydrate diet: -0.7 ± 1.0%, p = 0.019) duration [5]. In a 5-week crossover feeding study, 8 men with type 2 diabetes had greater improvement in fasting glucose, 24-hour glucose area-under-the-curve (AUC), 24-hour insulin AUC, and glycohemoglobin while on the low-carbohydrate diet than when on a eucaloric low-fat diet [7]. In a 14-day inpatient feeding study, 10 participants with type 2 diabetes experienced improvements in hemoglobin A1c and insulin sensitivity as measured by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp method [8]. Hemoglobin A1c also improved in an outpatient study of 16 participants who followed a 20% carbohydrate diet for 24 weeks [9].
Flaxseed meal is the star of this recipe and with good reason. Registered Nurse Tana Amen, RN says, “Compared to other plants, flaxseed (but not oil) is extremely rich in compounds called ligands, which have antioxidant and plant estrogen properties. Flaxseed-derived ligands have been shown to reduce blood sugar and may also help combat some forms of cancer.”
Psyllium husk powder is what you’ll need, and you can find it on Amazon. Flaxseed Meal is another ingredient you can use to provide a slightly chewy texture. Although I feel that it’s not as good as psyllium (as it gives a slightly gelled texture), many people have used it successfully in place of psyllium. Make sure you grab a pack or 3 from Amazon. It’s super cheap and lasts a long time!

The importance of dietary CHO is so well ingrained that the concept is taken for granted. In fact, basic macronutrient guidelines are predicated upon the idea that the central nervous system (CNS) requires a minimum of ~130 grams (~520 kcal) per day to function properly (i.e., to maintain optimal cognitive function). As a result, the minimum recommended daily intake of CHO reflects this idea (7). Similarly, most contemporary texts on sports nutrition emphasize the outsized role of CHO in optimizing both athletic performance and recovery (9). Frequently referred to as the “master fuel,” recommendations range from 3 – 12 grams per kilogram of bodyweight, per day. As an example, the recommended daily intake for a 180-lb athlete would be 246 – 982 grams, with a caloric equivalent of 984 – 3,928 calories. In marked contrast, the KD would recommend a maximum of just 50 grams (~ 200 calories) per day for the same individual.
To help you get acquainted with making keto-friendly baked goods, we decided to put this article together with all the info you’ll need to get started. Below you will find the many low carb flour options you can use on keto, how to utilize them correctly, and some of our favorite low-carb flour recipes. After reading through this guide, you will have the information you need to make the keto-friendly version of the high-carb food that you’ve been craving.
Increases in cholesterol levels need discussion too. We do see temporary increases in cholesterol levels often as individuals transition onto a ketogenic diet. However, when you examine lipid particle size (a more important way to look at the cardiovascular risks), the risk pattern doesn’t seem to increase with a ketogenic diet. Harvard Health has written about lipid particle size here before: http://www.health.harvard.edu/womens-health/should-you-seek-advanced-cholesterol-testing-
Hi Shandelle, Sorry to hear that it didn’t rise for you! I don’t live at high altitude so can’t test in those conditions. I’ve read that high altitude baking usually requires reducing baking powder slightly and increasing oven temperature by 15-25 degrees. If your bread rose at first but then fell flat, this could help. If it never rose in the first place, you could try more baking powder and whisking the batter more to introduce more air. I’m so glad that you like the recipes overall though!
A 4-ounce serving of House Foods Tofu Shirataki Spaghetti contains 10 calories, .5 grams of fat, 3 grams of carbohydrates and less than 1 gram of protein. A 2-ounce serving (the weight is different because shiritaki noodles are already cooked) of Barilla Angel Hair pasta contains 200 calories, 1 gram of fat, 42 grams of carbohydrates and 7 grams of protein.
Trim Healthy Mama-Friendly (THM) (www.trimhealthymama.com): This is an S baking mix as it is written due to the heavy almond flour amount. However, it could easily be made into a Fuel Pull or an E mix by reducing the amount of almond flour. For the FP, you would reduce the amount of almond flour and replace it with oat fiber. For the E mix, you would reduce the amount of almond flour and replace it with oat flour or sprouted wheat flour. Easy peasy! Also, like the suggestions above for the Family-Friendly folks, you could make it as it is listed and then use half and half—half Basic Low Carb Flour Mix and half oat fiber for FP OR half Basic Low Carb Flour Mix and half oat flour or sprouted wheat for E mix. (I do not do much FP or E baking, but I would make this mix as is and then combine it with Sprouted Flour Mix anytime you want to make an E baked good. Easy peasy!)
The ketogenic diet is usually initiated in combination with the patient's existing anticonvulsant regimen, though patients may be weaned off anticonvulsants if the diet is successful. Some evidence of synergistic benefits is seen when the diet is combined with the vagus nerve stimulator or with the drug zonisamide, and that the diet may be less successful in children receiving phenobarbital.[18]

This keto recipe is a great basic one that you can enjoy as it is or use it as a carrier for other ingredients of choice. The cinnamon gives the coconut flakes a fantastic flavor and I found it didn’t really need any added sweetener. When you are baking the flakes just remember to keep checking on them so that they don’t burn, as this will give them a bitter taste.
Con: Results can vary depending on how much fluid you drink. By drinking more water, you dilute the concentration of ketones in the urine and thus a lower level of ketones will be detected on the strips. The strips don’t show a precise ketone level. Finally, and most importantly, as you become increasingly keto-adapted and your body reabsorbs ketones from the urine, urine strips may become unreliable, even if you’re in ketosis.
A well-formulated ketogenic diet, besides limiting carbohydrates, also limits protein intake moderately to less than 1g/lb body weight, unless individuals are performing heavy exercise involving weight training when the protein intake can be increased to 1.5g/lb body weight. This is to prevent the endogenous production of glucose in the body via gluconeogenesis. However, it does not restrict fat or overall daily calories. People on a ketogenic diet initially experience rapid weight loss up to 10 lbs in 2 weeks or less. This diet has a diuretic effect, and some early weight loss is due to water weight loss followed by a fat loss. Interestingly with this diet plan, lean body muscle is largely spared. As a nutritional ketosis state sustains, hunger pangs subside, and an overall reduction in caloric intake helps to further weight loss.
While everyone needs to eat carbohydrates, some people need more carbs than others. People who are very active need to eat more carbs than people who are sedentary. Those with diabetes also usually need to limit the amount of carbohydrates they consume during each meal to help keep their blood sugar levels in check. Finally, people on low-carb diets such as the Atkins or South Beach diets may limit their carbohydrate intakes in an attempt to boost weight loss.
In summary, the LCKD had positive effects on body weight, waist measurement, serum triglycerides, and glycemic control in a cohort of 21 participants with type 2 diabetes. Most impressive is that improvement in hemoglobin A1c was observed despite a small sample size and short duration of follow-up, and this improvement in glycemic control occurred while diabetes medications were reduced substantially in many participants. Future research must further examine the optimal medication adjustments, particularly for diabetes and diuretic agents, in order to avoid possible complications of hypoglycemia and dehydration. Because the LCKD can be very effective at lowering blood glucose, patients on diabetes medication who use this diet should be under close medical supervision or capable of adjusting their medication.

Participants were recruited from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) outpatient clinics. Inclusion criteria were age 35–75 years; body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2; and fasting serum glucose >125 mg/dL or hemoglobin A1c >6.5% without medications, or treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) and/or insulin. Exclusion criteria were evidence of renal insufficiency, liver disease, or unstable cardiovascular disease by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. All participants provided written informed consent approved by the institutional review board. No monetary incentives were provided.
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