I was a Corpsman (not a corpse-man as some recent somewhat fanatical president would say), and I can tell you many stories of Marines and Sailors who maintained restrictive diets (aka picky eaters). Most obvious was lack of sustaining energy (hypoglycemia) at mile 15 (with 80lbs of gear including a 6.5lb rifle and 200 rnds of ammo, etc.) and depletion of essential vitamins, electrolyte imbalance. They were always the first to collapse and have to hear me scold “see I told you so.” An IV of D5W usually does the trick (D is for dextrose, OMG!)
Overweight individuals with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are likely to see improvements in the clinical markers of disease risk with a well-formulated very-low-carbohydrate diet. Glucose control improves due to less glucose introduction and improved insulin sensitivity. In addition to reducing weight, especially truncal obesity and insulin resistance, low-carb diets also may help improve blood pressure, blood glucose regulation, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol levels. However, LDL cholesterol may increase on this diet.
When you are eating breakfast on the ketogenic diet, there is always the need to balance things up. For beginners and everyone else, balancing things means taking moderate volume of each nutrient contained in the foods you eat. Many of the times the only food available at breakfast is a grab and go option like fruit or a bar loaded with sugar. And that’s where low carb cereal comes in. They can help to bring great balance to your diet. 
Hi Cyn, The numbers are general guidelines but will vary depending on many factors, such as activity level, insulin resistance, weight and more. There is no single magic number, just conventional recommendations that are a good starting point. I will have a macro calculator coming soon that will help determine what is best for each person, but even then it’s an approximation. The only way to know for sure is to test. If keto is your goal, it’s usually best to start lower and then see if you can stay in ketosis when increasing.

The ketogenic diet achieved national media exposure in the US in October 1994, when NBC's Dateline television programme reported the case of Charlie Abrahams, son of Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams. The two-year-old suffered from epilepsy that had remained uncontrolled by mainstream and alternative therapies. Abrahams discovered a reference to the ketogenic diet in an epilepsy guide for parents and brought Charlie to John M. Freeman at Johns Hopkins Hospital, which had continued to offer the therapy. Under the diet, Charlie's epilepsy was rapidly controlled and his developmental progress resumed. This inspired Abrahams to create the Charlie Foundation to promote the diet and fund research.[10] A multicentre prospective study began in 1994, the results were presented to the American Epilepsy Society in 1996 and were published[17] in 1998. There followed an explosion of scientific interest in the diet. In 1997, Abrahams produced a TV movie, ...First Do No Harm, starring Meryl Streep, in which a young boy's intractable epilepsy is successfully treated by the ketogenic diet.[1]
I have never made waffles with this mix as we don’t make waffles. However, I would think it would be similar to pancakes, which I have made. Did you use 1/4 cup of Xantham gum? More than this seems to make a pastier batter. When making pancakes, I found that I needed to batter to be way thicker than most pancake batters. I also found that I needed more eggs. As for what else this mix can be used for, I have recipes at the blog for cookies, cupcakes, biscuits, and crepes using this mix. I have dozens of recipes in various stages of testing that use this mix. Some of my favorites are quick breads and muffins and cookies. Cake type recipes (muffins, small loaves of bread, cupcakes, cake, etc.) really turn out well with this mix. Let me know how some other dishes turn out for you! Thanks!
Brenda, here is the link to the article. From what I have been reading the diarrhea is not uncommon. I had been using KCT oil in my coffee and smoothies, that compounded the problem. I have tried several of the suggestions this article suggested and it has been a great help. My wife and I were wondering what fat sources are you using. We have been trying to get more fat into our diets. We do use butter, sour cream, full fat dairy products, and changed our hamburger meat back to 85-15, most of the time. Super love your articles, they show you care. That is what is missing in today’s world.
The ketone bodies are possibly anticonvulsant; in animal models, acetoacetate and acetone protect against seizures. The ketogenic diet results in adaptive changes to brain energy metabolism that increase the energy reserves; ketone bodies are a more efficient fuel than glucose, and the number of mitochondria is increased. This may help the neurons to remain stable in the face of increased energy demand during a seizure, and may confer a neuroprotective effect.[56]

I was doing LCHF (under 20 carbs most days) , Type II diabetic on a little insulin, After less than 3 mos I brought my A1C from 10.9 down to 7.1…….off to a great start. Now…..I am not only diabetic, I recently had open heart surgery (quadruple bypass),meaning “cardiac diet”. Do you know of any diabetic/cardiac people that are doing Keto? Curious about high fat for cardiac. (FYI: My Doctors are following me closely so know what I’m doing.)
It is a carbohydrate for sure (the way it acts). It is why breads are fluffier when it is added. The carb count is included in the mix for the addition of the gluten (if you decide to add it). For those who do not want gluten or can’t have it (or do not want the twelve carbs per mix (approximately 1 carb per cup of the mix from the gluten), you can definitely do the xantham gum and/or omit it. Does that help? I’d love to know more of your thoughts! Thanks!

I haven’t had great success converting chocolate chip cookie recipes. I think it’s because my expectations are for the cookies to taste like my daughter’s perfect, sugary-white=flour-amazing ones. And it just doesn’t happen. I do have my peanut butter cookie recipes up, and I put chocolate chips in those sometimes. Back to your question with the coconut flour. I expected to have to tweak recipes a lot more for the small amount of coconut flour in this mix, but it hasn’t been the case. Sometimes I add a little extra almond milk, but I haven’t had to increase the eggs like I thought I would have to. That said, I would start with your regular amounts and play with the dough and see. Another egg might be needed. I will be surprised if you get the original crispy/chewy texture, but please let me know if you do!!! 🙂
There are three instances where there’s research to back up a ketogenic diet, including to help control type 2 diabetes, as part of epilepsy treatment, or for weight loss, says Mattinson. “In terms of diabetes, there is some promising research showing that the ketogenic diet may improve glycemic control. It may cause a reduction in A1C — a key test for diabetes that measures a person’s average blood sugar control over two to three months — something that may help you reduce medication use,” she says.
Coconut flour is made from dehydrated coconut meat after most its fat has been extracted to produce coconut oil.  Each 1/4 cup of coconut flour contains 60 calories, 2.5 g of fat, 6 g of protein, 19 g of carbohydrates, 12 g of fiber, and 7 g of net carbs. Due to its high fiber content, this low-carb flour is perfect for anyone who needs a digestive health boost.
A creamy, cheesy alternative to typical mac and cheese, it’s not a stretch to think this version is preferable to using elbow pasta, no matter what your relationship with carbs may be. Boil cauliflower, whisk up a cheese sauce, and throw it all in the oven. For a fancier twist, use your favorite non-cheddar cheeses or a combo (mozzarella and pepper jack, anyone?)

Hi Barb, That can definitely be it. Losing when you are close to goal can be more difficult. It could also be that your body’s healthy weight is a little higher than what you’d like – which doesn’t mean you can’t lose, but makes it more difficult. If just eating Keto foods isn’t working, double check the macros for your weight and see if the amount you’re eating needs to be adjusted. You’ll find more help and support in our support group here.


Y. Wady Aude, MD; Arthur S. Agatston, MD; Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, MD, MSc; Eric H. Lieberman, MD; Marie Almon, MS, RD; Melinda Hansen, ARNP; Gerardo Rojas, MD; Gervasio A. Lamas, MD; Charles H. Hennekens, MD, DrPH, “The National Cholesterol Education Program Diet vs a Diet Lower in Carbohydrates and Higher in Protein and Monounsaturated Fat,” Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(19):2141-2146. http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=217514.
In Asia, the normal diet includes rice and noodles as the main energy source, making their elimination difficult. Therefore, the MCT-oil form of the diet, which allows more carbohydrate, has proved useful. In India, religious beliefs commonly affect the diet: some patients are vegetarians, will not eat root vegetables or avoid beef. The Indian ketogenic diet is started without a fast due to cultural opposition towards fasting in children. The low-fat, high-carbohydrate nature of the normal Indian and Asian diet means that their ketogenic diets typically have a lower ketogenic ratio (1:1) than in America and Europe. However, they appear to be just as effective.[54]
While low-carb simply describes a vague behavior pattern that is subject to each person, ketosis is an objective and measurable fat-burning state of the human body. It is when the body’s metabolism switches gears to burn fat for energy instead of sugar. It is this metabolic state in which people experience the full benefits of a ketogenic lifestyle.
I really appreciate this article. I have done low Carb for the most part for over 15 years and was able to keep my weight down. Now that I have gone through menopause is just keeps getting harder. I try doing keto but tend to fall off the wagon a lot and go back to low Carb or Weight Watchers. Simple ideas would be great. I think some keto bloggers make it seem that you have to create difficult recipes. Thanks for all you do.
Hi Celia, It sounds like you are looking at something else. Did you sign up for the email list using the form? The PDF does not contain any comments or pictures at all, so it sounds like you were looking at some other file. If you signed up to get the free PDF, please feel free to respond to the email you received and I’d be happy to help you locate the right file. I promise the food list does have net carb counts for every food and there are no pictures – it’s a single printable page.
A survey in 2005 of 88 paediatric neurologists in the US found that 36% regularly prescribed the diet after three or more drugs had failed, 24% occasionally prescribed the diet as a last resort, 24% had only prescribed the diet in a few rare cases, and 16% had never prescribed the diet. Several possible explanations exist for this gap between evidence and clinical practice.[34] One major factor may be the lack of adequately trained dietitians, who are needed to administer a ketogenic diet programme.[31]
Hi Roseanne. It can be hard to start especially when stressed out. Here is an idea to help you ease into a low carb lifestyle. First, know that I am not a nutritionist nor a doctor. There were times I thought I would go out of my mind without a piece of low carb cheesecake in the morning. I’m not a big egg eater and that saved my life until I found how easy quiches were to make and how much I loved them. If you are craving something, eat something – as long as it is low carb. There were days I ate all day long – there were also days I ate very little. For me it was all or nothing. Cheat days didn’t work for me because they brought back cravings. If you are stressed out and need something sweet – make a protein smoothie with ice (look at my smoothie bowl recipe). It is much better to go a little over your calories and carbs than to have a pig out. I hope these simple ideas help. Have a wonderful week and good luck. -Kim
Participants were recruited from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) outpatient clinics. Inclusion criteria were age 35–75 years; body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2; and fasting serum glucose >125 mg/dL or hemoglobin A1c >6.5% without medications, or treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) and/or insulin. Exclusion criteria were evidence of renal insufficiency, liver disease, or unstable cardiovascular disease by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. All participants provided written informed consent approved by the institutional review board. No monetary incentives were provided.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Interested in trying a fad diet? There are plenty to choose from, and low-carb pasta can be incorporated into most. The Atkins, ketogenic, and paleo diets — to name just a few — all prescribe a low-carb lifestyle to support health and fitness. On these diets, instead of consuming carbs for energy, you will eat protein, healthy fats, fruits, and veggies. Each of the aforementioned programs allows for a small portion of carbs each day, so you can chow down on low-carb pasta without falling off plan.
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