A: The most common ways to track your carbs is through MyFitnessPal and their mobile app. You cannot track net carbs on the app, although you can track your total carb intake and your total fiber intake. To get your net carbs, just subtract your total fiber intake from your total carb intake. I have written an article on How to Track Carbs on MyFitnessPal.
In relation to overall caloric intake, carbohydrates comprise around 55% of the typical American diet, ranging from 200 to 350 g/day. The vast potential of refined carbohydrates to cause harmful effects were relatively neglected until recently. A greater intake of sugar-laden food is associated with a 44% increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity and a 26% increase in the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. In a 2012 study of all cardiometabolic deaths (heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes) in the United States, an estimated 45.4% were associated with suboptimal intakes of 10 dietary factors. The largest estimated mortality was associated with high sodium intake (9.5%), followed by low intake of nuts and seeds (8.5%), high intake of processed meats (8.2%), low intake of omega-3 fats (7.8%), low intake of vegetables 7.6%), low intake of fruits (7.5%), and high intake of artificially sweetened beverages (7.4%). The lowest estimated mortality was associated with low polyunsaturated fats (2.3%) and unprocessed red meats (0.4%). In addition to this direct harm, excess consumption of low-quality carbohydrates may displace and leave no room in the diet for healthier foods like nuts, unprocessed grains,  fruits, and vegetables.
At 60 minutes, the bread showed as done with a toothpick. Removed it from the oven and it sank down the center. I waited 15 minutes. Cut a piece off and it was wet, like not done in the center. I baked it 15 more min and it stayed the same. Is it supposed to be wet/moist like, maybe it’s oily from the coconut oil? If it’s supposed to be completely dry but moist, not wet, then something went wrong.
Some health experts recommend people get between 45 and 65 percent of their daily calories from carbs, with more active people erring on the higher side and less active people eating fewer carbs. For example, an active woman between the ages of 19 and 25, who is aiming to maintain weight, should consume about 2,600 calories that include 293-423 grams of carbs a day. They should then get 15 to 25 percent of calories from fat and protein.
Supporting these results, Naude et al. (15) found a similar outcome in obese adults with and without type 2 diabetes. This meta-analysis of 19 randomized, controlled trials compared dietary interventions using standard CHO recommendation (i.e., 45 – 65%), low-carbohydrate/high protein (LCHP) and low-carbohydrate/high fat (this group, although not specifically stated, met the criteria for KD). Results demonstrated significant weight loss among all groups in the short-term (3 – 6 months) and long-term (1 – 2 years), with no significant difference among dietary interventions. The authors concluded that weight loss interventions using CHO restriction are equally effective as isocaloric diets of standard CHO recommendation.
Hi Celia, It sounds like you are looking at something else. Did you sign up for the email list using the form? The PDF does not contain any comments or pictures at all, so it sounds like you were looking at some other file. If you signed up to get the free PDF, please feel free to respond to the email you received and I’d be happy to help you locate the right file. I promise the food list does have net carb counts for every food and there are no pictures – it’s a single printable page.
The ketogenic diet is a mainstream dietary therapy that was developed to reproduce the success and remove the limitations of the non-mainstream use of fasting to treat epilepsy.[Note 2] Although popular in the 1920s and '30s, it was largely abandoned in favour of new anticonvulsant drugs.[1] Most individuals with epilepsy can successfully control their seizures with medication. However, 20–30% fail to achieve such control despite trying a number of different drugs.[9] For this group, and for children in particular, the diet has once again found a role in epilepsy management.[1][10]
The ketosis produced by fasting or limiting carbohydrate intake does not have negative effects for most people once the body has adapted to that state. The ketosis caused by diet has been referred to as dietary ketosis, physiological ketosis, benign dietary ketosis (Atkins), and, most recently, nutritional ketosis (Phinney and Volek), in an attempt to clear up possible confusion with diabetic ketoacidosis.
Using almond instead of wheat-based flour keeps these breakfast beauties lower in carbs without sacrificing the tiniest bit of taste. Whip up the batter with a blender for a quicker breakfast, or use a bowl and whisk—either option yields delicious results. Add berries for some color and a fruity zing. Oh, and trust us one this one—make an extra batch to freeze for a busy morning.
Thank you so much for all of this great info! My husband started a Keto plan two weeks ago so I have been researching going Keto for a few weeks now. I figured I’d use him as a guinea pig to test buying food, preparing and cooking meals to see how easy or hard it would be to hit his macros for the day. I decided to start it this week (today is my fourth day) so now I am doubling up on the recipes so there’s enough for the both of us. I am still constantly looking for more recipes and trying to get more comfortable with changing up food so we are not eating the same things everyday. I can’t wait to try the meatloaf since it’s one of my favorite dishes! Thank you again for all the work you put in to sharing this info with others!
With just 4g of carbs, this pasta, made from hearts of palm, is a plant-based pasta substitute you may not have heard about before. Palmini is low in calories, high in fiber, gluten free, and looks more like traditional pasta than some other alternatives. It can be purchased canned or in pouches. While you can eat it straight from the package, it also cooks up well—keeping its pasta-like consistency.
Similar to the recommendations I make in Grain Brain, a ketogenic diet should derive a majority of its calories from fat. However, the optimal macronutrient ratio will vary from person to person. Some will thrive on roughly 80% of calories from healthy fats and 20% from carbohydrates and protein. Others may do better in the range of 60 – 75% of calories from fat and slightly more protein. I encourage you to experiment to find what works best for you. To meet this goal, you must consume plentiful amounts of healthy plant and animal fats. Some good examples of healthy fats include:
Hi Brandie, If you used pulp from making almond milk, that is likely the issue. This would be almond meal, not finely ground blanched almond flour. Homemade ground almonds generally aren’t as fine as the store bought blanched almond flour, and this affects the texture in baked goods in a pretty big way. Not using fresh baking powder would definitely contribute as well. Sounds like a good idea to add some baking soda and cider vinegar to compensate, but I haven’t tried it. Try it with super fine blanched almond flour next time and it should definitely rise more.
In one week my husband lost 1.5 kg because of Keto diet and recipes. Thank you for the insights and tips. I would like to have a complete recipe for meals everyday and hoping by subscribing I will receive try my mail. I will keep u posted. It takes 2 to tango. The one who wants to diet must be cooperative with the plan and execution while the other person who is preparing the food must be patient to the dieting person. Its not easy to change meals so patience is required
You can grind almost any nut to obtain a flour-like consistency and use it to reduce the carb content of your recipes. Walnut meal, for example, can be used in many recipes that call for almond flour. Other nut flours that you can experiment with are hazelnut meal, pecan meal, macadamia nut meal, and pistachio meal. Each one will provide your baked goods with a unique flavor, so choose wisely.

Aude, Y., A. S, Agatston, F. Lopez-Jimenez, et al. “The National Cholesterol Education Program Diet vs a Diet Lower in Carbohydrates and Higher in Protein and Monounsaturated Fat: A Randomized Trial.” JAMA Internal Medicine 164, no. 19 (2004): 2141–46. doi: 10.1001/archinte.164.19.2141. jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/217514.
I know I know, you’re reading the directions and you’re annoyed that you have to cut each and every ¾ inch square out and transfer it to a pan because WHO HAS TIME FOR THAT. But I am here to tell you that YOU HAVE TIME FOR IT because the end result is cereal that fancy-person-you made yourself, which is going to make you feel very elite and accomplished because WHO DOES THAT?
Regular flour is made from wheat and grains, both of which have high amounts of carbohydrates. To make a similar flour with fewer carbohydrates, different sources — sources considered low-carb — are used. These sources typically include nuts such as almonds and walnuts, seeds such as flax seed, and legumes such as peanuts and soy. Wheat also can be used as low-carb flour, but only if the wheat section containing the protein is used and nothing else.
You can still get a super crisp crust on chicken while keeping it moist and juicy on the inside. There are a few ways to do this, but the best method we’ve found is by grinding up pork rinds in the food processor and adding parmesan cheese to the mix. This will result in a fantastic crust all the way around your chicken, giving you the perfect keto fried chicken.
Hi! My donuts are in the oven right now, but they are spreading too much & not rising. Almost running off the donut pan. I only filled them 3/4 full as you show in the video. I doubled the recipe using the above calculator. I know I followed it exactly. Any idea of what I did wrong? The batter tasted yummy and so did the finished product, the donuts just weren’t as pretty as yours.
Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
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