Hi Stacey, I can’t give medical advice and definitely recommend following your doctor’s recommendations. You can ask him/her if low carb would be better suited for you. Also, you may want to double check with him/her if the kidney concern was related to high protein, because that is a common misconception about keto – it is not a high protein diet/lifestyle.


I’m trying your recipe for the first time. It is very similar to a bun recipe that I make with psyllium husks so I am incorporating the method from that into this recipe. I made a few slight changes… I added garlic powder ground Rosemary and oregano, one quarter cup ground flaxseed, one tablespoon apple cider vinegar. I only used 3 eggs, and increased the Water by 2 tablespoons. By adding apple cider vinegar and the baking soda, they create a very light effervescent foam as they interactwhen I add the warm water, which acts naturally to the raise the bread, thereby allowing me to decrease the eggs. I added the extra water due to the extra dry ingredients. I’m very confident that this will work out very well. It always works with my buns so I’m eager to test this out. Thank you again for the base recipe.
Several studies have investigated the potential of LCD or KD on weight loss. For example, Brinkworth et al. (2) compared one year of low-fat (LF) vs. LCD diet in adults with abdominal obesity. Subjects were randomly assigned and diets were isocaloric, with moderate energy restriction. Both groups realized significant weight loss, however, there was no significant difference between groups, suggesting that a LCD was equally effective as a LF diet.
Yes, the psyllium husk powder is required for this recipe. I try to provide alternatives or substitutions where possible, but in this case other ingredients won’t have the same effect. The psyllium husk powder gives this a true bread texture. You could possibly reduce the amount a bit, but not remove it altogether. I hope you get the chance to try it!
The ketogenic diet is usually initiated in combination with the patient's existing anticonvulsant regimen, though patients may be weaned off anticonvulsants if the diet is successful. Some evidence of synergistic benefits is seen when the diet is combined with the vagus nerve stimulator or with the drug zonisamide, and that the diet may be less successful in children receiving phenobarbital.[18]

Toasted coconut flakes make the perfect alternative to corn flakes in cereals like this one, letting you still enjoy the crunch but without the added issues that traditional cereals can cause. Just be careful to watch the flakes as they toast so they don’t burn. Serve this cereal with your favorite milk and a few berries and you have a tasty and filling breakfast cereal to keep you going all morning.


H. Guldbrand, B. Dizdar, B. Bunjaku, T. Lindström, M. Bachrach-Lindström, M. Fredrikson, C. J. Östgren, F. H. Nystrom, “In Type 2 Diabetes, Randomisation to Advice to Follow a Low-carbohydrate Diet Transiently Improves Glycaemic Control Compared with Advice to Follow a Low-fat Diet Producing a Similar Weight Loss,” Diabetologia (2012) 55: 2118. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-012-2567-4.

Because the ketogenic diet alters the body's metabolism, it is a first-line therapy in children with certain congenital metabolic diseases such as pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) deficiency and glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome,[35] which prevent the body from using carbohydrates as fuel, leading to a dependency on ketone bodies. The ketogenic diet is beneficial in treating the seizures and some other symptoms in these diseases and is an absolute indication.[36] However, it is absolutely contraindicated in the treatment of other diseases such as pyruvate carboxylase deficiency, porphyria, and other rare genetic disorders of fat metabolism.[9] Persons with a disorder of fatty acid oxidation are unable to metabolise fatty acids, which replace carbohydrates as the major energy source on the diet. On the ketogenic diet, their bodies would consume their own protein stores for fuel, leading to ketoacidosis, and eventually coma and death.[37]
Interested in trying a fad diet? There are plenty to choose from, and low-carb pasta can be incorporated into most. The Atkins, ketogenic, and paleo diets — to name just a few — all prescribe a low-carb lifestyle to support health and fitness. On these diets, instead of consuming carbs for energy, you will eat protein, healthy fats, fruits, and veggies. Each of the aforementioned programs allows for a small portion of carbs each day, so you can chow down on low-carb pasta without falling off plan.

The keto diet (also known as ketogenic diet, low carb diet and LCHF diet) is a low carbohydrate, high fat diet. Maintaining this diet is a great tool for weight loss. More importantly though, according to an increasing number of studies, it helps reduce risk factors for diabetes, heart diseases, stroke, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, and more1-6.On the keto diet, your body enters a metabolic state called ketosis. While in ketosis your body is using ketone bodies for energy instead of glucose. Ketone bodies are derived from fat and are a much more stable, steady source of energy than glucose, which is derived from carbohydrates.
I had to make a few changes though. First, what makes a donut taste like a donut is nutmeg. I added a few gratings and cut the cinnamon down to about half. Second, I live in South Korea and almond milk almost always contains sugar and is very expensive. I used heavy cream and then added a splash of water when the batter was very thick. Third, I don’t have erythritol, but I do have a stevia and erythritol blend so I used that. 

"Avoid inflammatory oils like safflower, sunflower, corn, or soybean oils and opt for whole food cereal or granolas with limited ingredients, which tend to be made from nuts, seeds and occasionally whole oats or puffed rice," says Kelly LeVeque, RD, a celebrity nutritionist who works with Jennifer Garner and Jessica Alba, and author of Body Love. One of her faves: This grain-free granola from Thrive Market, which has a blissfully short ingredient list but tons of flavor.
Elisabeth Almekinder, a certified CDE and expert in Diabetes Self-Management Education Program, grew up in a small town in the piedmont of NC. During her time at St. Andrews Presbyterian College, she developed a love of writing and obtained a BA in English. After obtaining her nursing degree, her first job out of school was on the vascular surgery floor, where she saw many people with diabetes lose their limbs. She worked as an RN for 22 years in public health in South Carolina. In her spare time away from educating people about diabetes, she continues her passion by writing about diabetes.
You can find all my recipes on the main landing page of my website. There’s a search bar at the top and you can type anything you’re looking for, if I’ve made a recipe for it you’ll see it. Also there’s a tab at the top of the page that says recipe index and a ton of categories for you to find what you’re looking for. If you want to never miss a new recipe, I post twice weekly, you can subscribe to my website by adding you email address in the middle of the landing page, that says, Never Miss a Recipe. Hope that helps!

Hi Tanisha, Sunflower seed flour should work in the same quantity (you can buy it here). I haven’t tried it for this recipe, but it does often work as a good almond flour replacement. The only thing to keep in mind is that the bread may come out green in color – sunflower seed flour tends to do this when baked – but it doesn’t affect the taste. Let me know how it goes if you try it!

Carbohydrate: Most of what determines how ketogenic a diet is will depend on how much carbohydrate is eaten, as well the individual's metabolism and activity level. A diet of less than 50 or 60 grams of net (effective) carbohydrate per day is generally ketogenic. Some sources say to consume no more than 20 grams of carbohydrates per day, while others cite up to 50 grams, and many recommend no more than 5 percent of calories from carbs. However, athletes and people with healthy metabolisms may be able to eat 100 or more grams of net carbohydrate in a day and maintain a desired level of ketosis. At the same time, an older sedentary person with Type 2 diabetes may have to eat less than 30 net grams to achieve the same level.
You’re transitioning. Your body is equipped to process a high intake of carbs and a lower intake of fat. Your body needs to create enzymes to be able to do this. In the transitional period, the brain may run low on energy which can lead to grogginess, nausea, and headaches. If you’re having a large problem with this, you can choose to reduce carb intake gradually.
The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was developed for treatment of paediatric epilepsy in the 1920s and was widely used into the next decade, but its popularity waned with the introduction of effective anticonvulsant medications. This classic ketogenic diet contains a 4:1 ratio by weight of fat to combined protein and carbohydrate. This is achieved by excluding high-carbohydrate foods such as starchy fruits and vegetables, bread, pasta, grains, and sugar, while increasing the consumption of foods high in fat such as nuts, cream, and butter.[1] Most dietary fat is made of molecules called long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). However, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs)—made from fatty acids with shorter carbon chains than LCTs—are more ketogenic. A variant of the classic diet known as the MCT ketogenic diet uses a form of coconut oil, which is rich in MCTs, to provide around half the calories. As less overall fat is needed in this variant of the diet, a greater proportion of carbohydrate and protein can be consumed, allowing a greater variety of food choices.[4][5]

When dietary CHO is of sufficient quantity the body has the ability to store small amounts for later use. Stored CHO is referred to as glycogen. Body reserves of glycogen, however, are limited, with relatively small amounts stored in the liver and skeletal muscle. As CHO is the “go to” energy source for the CNS, as well as an important energy source for other tissues, the body must maintain a stable supply of circulating blood glucose. While this is a complex process, the liver is primarily responsible for either breaking down stored glycogen or manufacturing small amounts of glucose in a process known as gluconeogenesis. In this manner the liver is able to maintain circulating blood glucose levels under most conditions. If the liver is unable to supply a sufficient amount of glucose, blood sugar levels will fall and result in hypoglycemia, a condition characterized by hunger, fatigue, headache, nausea and impairments in cognitive ability. In sporting terms hypoglycemia is referred to as “bonking” or “hitting the wall” and significantly affects athletic performance. Therefore, it is easy to understand the perceived need for dietary CHO; in the absence of sufficient blood glucose, physiological function is rapidly compromised.

OMG these are out of this world! I did the same recipe except I didn’t add the cinnamon. I added orange zest and cranberries. I did a cream cheese icing with swerve and more orange zest. Absolutely wonderful. Thank you for your recipe! I’m happy I can make that occasional treat to curb off those sweet craving without completely falling off the keto wagon.
Your glycogen stores can still be refilled while on a ketogenic diet. A keto diet is an excellent way to build muscle, but protein intake is crucial here. It’s suggested that if you are looking to gain mass, you should be taking in about 1.0 – 1.2g protein per lean pound of body mass. Putting muscle on may be slower on a ketogenic diet, but that’s because your total body fat is not increasing as much.5Note that in the beginning of a ketogenic diet, both endurance athletes and obese individuals see a physical performance for the first week of transition.
My 1st attempt & it was delish w/unsweetened organic coconut milk.Had no hazelnuts & only half the amount of almonds so I substituted extra pecans. Used unground flax & also added additional 2 tbs ground flax for more fiber. Added 1 tbs vanilla. Used a combo of sweeteners: Eryth, Xylitol & Stevia. Next time will grind ingredients separately to get a more chunky result.
Erythitol gives me painful tummy cramps; Swerve or Pyure and generic brands all cause this. 1 tsp liquid stevia or liquid Splenda is equivalent to 1 C erythitol, so 1/4-1/2 tsp is enough for this recipe. However adding a liquid sweetener offsets the solid to liquid ratio. I usually add sifted egg protein powder in the amount of the powered sweetener. A glaze can be made with coconut milk, liquid sweetener, and thickened with xanthan gum. A lemon extract or raspberry extract are perfect for flavoring the glaze.
I have made your beautiful bread a number of times, however today I scored the top to help it rise. Unfortunately it rose too quickly and it has a huge hole in right through the middle of it 🙁 might be good for toad in the hole tomorrow morning but not much else 🙂 do you know how I can prevent the hole next time? I was so excited about the heigh of this attempt but may have to stop the scoring in the future. Thx
A ketogenic diet could be an interesting alternative to treat certain conditions, and may accelerate weight loss. But it is hard to follow and it can be heavy on red meat and other fatty, processed, and salty foods that are notoriously unhealthy. We also do not know much about its long-term effects, probably because it’s so hard to stick with that people can’t eat this way for a long time. It is also important to remember that “yo-yo diets” that lead to rapid weight loss fluctuation are associated with increased mortality. Instead of engaging in the next popular diet that would last only a few weeks to months (for most people that includes a ketogenic diet), try to embrace change that is sustainable over the long term. A balanced, unprocessed diet, rich in very colorful fruits and vegetables, lean meats, fish, whole grains, nuts, seeds, olive oil, and lots of water seems to have the best evidence for a long, healthier, vibrant life.
Physicians of ancient Greece treated diseases, including epilepsy, by altering their patients' diet. An early treatise in the Hippocratic Corpus, On the Sacred Disease, covers the disease; it dates from c. 400 BC. Its author argued against the prevailing view that epilepsy was supernatural in origin and cure, and proposed that dietary therapy had a rational and physical basis.[Note 3] In the same collection, the author of Epidemics describes the case of a man whose epilepsy is cured as quickly as it had appeared, through complete abstinence of food and drink.[Note 4] The royal physician Erasistratus declared, "One inclining to epilepsy should be made to fast without mercy and be put on short rations."[Note 5] Galen believed an "attenuating diet"[Note 6] might afford a cure in mild cases and be helpful in others.[11]
We hope our guide helps you in making healthy decisions based on your diabetes diet. If you’ve found any cereals that you feel like could be added to our list, please add them in the comments box below. If you try out any of our options here, let us know what you thought of them. Remember to check your blood sugar one to two hours after eating to determine a cereal’s affect on your blood sugar.
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