I bought a package and boiled the whole thing. I split it up to make two different meals with. The first one was simple jarred sauce and parmesan and the second was the noodles, sauteed zucchini and tomato, ricotta cheese, and parmesan. Both were DELICIOUS. With the tomato sauce dish, I really couldn't even tell the noodles were any different. Maybe they're slightly more fragile, but it's no worse than whole wheat ... full review

Erythitol gives me painful tummy cramps; Swerve or Pyure and generic brands all cause this. 1 tsp liquid stevia or liquid Splenda is equivalent to 1 C erythitol, so 1/4-1/2 tsp is enough for this recipe. However adding a liquid sweetener offsets the solid to liquid ratio. I usually add sifted egg protein powder in the amount of the powered sweetener. A glaze can be made with coconut milk, liquid sweetener, and thickened with xanthan gum. A lemon extract or raspberry extract are perfect for flavoring the glaze.


But I just made some biscuits from an old cooking book, which had Almonds grounded (so I just used my almond flour) & I switched sugar for some xylitol & then thought I’d use the Coconut flour in place of ordinary Plain Flour! I did it cup for cup, so it was 2/3 cup……remembered about needing more liquid, so I added an egg (receipt already had 150g butter, which I put in 160g) They taste nice, but I think maybe I should have reduced the coconut flour, after reading your points, or added another egg, or more butter, what would you do? They also have an almond on top. thanks, Pam
Just wanted to post in case others share my initial trepidation about trying the recipe. I avoid anything super high maintenance, but was intrigued by the positive reviews, so I gave it a try. Success! I did everything the recipe said not to (used a silicone pan and cheap almond flour that was definitely not ultra fine, and I have no idea how old my baking powder is), and they still turned out great! I did liberally butter the silicone pan to make sure I could get the donuts out and also added a smidge of xanthan gum to help hold them together.
To make cocoa puff balls (takes a LOT more time, but they’re REALLY fun): pinch a little thumbnail sized amount of dough and roll between your hands to form a ball. Place on the baking sheet. Bake for 8 minutes, then take baking sheet from oven and carefully move the balls around so they cook on the other side. Place bake in the oven and cook another 5 minutes. Allow to cool and enjoy!
If you need to eat more or fewer calories per day, you can adjust accordingly by simply taking out or adding a bit more of the ingredients already included in a recipe. For example, adding/removing a tablespoon of olive oil or butter will add/remove about 100 calories. If you like or dislike certain recipes, feel free to shift things around. Make sure to keep an eye on the calories so you’re still falling within an acceptable range of your daily goal.
Katie, Almond flour is probably the easiest keto-friendly flour for a new cook to work with. It’s very versatile and can be used in recipes for cookies, muffins, breads, scones, cakes, etc. (Of course the ratio of almond flour to other ingredients changes based on what you’re making.) But with that being said, because almond flour doesn’t have gluten, it can be difficult to simulate the soft crumb of regular baked goods unless you combine almond flour with another keto-friendly flour and/or a binding agent. This is why a lot of our recipes call for more than one type of flour. I hope this helps! If you’re looking for a certain recipe in particular please let us know and we’ll try to point you in the right direction!
From the study itself: “Mortality increased when carbohydrates were exchanged for animal-derived fat or protein and mortality decreased when the substitutions were plant-based … Low carbohydrate dietary patterns favouring animal-derived protein and fat sources, from sources such as lamb, beef, pork, and chicken, were associated with higher mortality, whereas those that favoured plant-derived protein and fat intake, from sources such as vegetables, nuts, peanut butter, and whole-grain breads, were associated with lower mortality, suggesting that the source of food notably modifies the association between carbohydrate intake and mortality.”
I made these yesterday using straight from the fridge eggs and cream cheese, parchment paper sprayed with cooking spray (I folded up the sides of the paper to prevent leakage), and a mini-chopper. Even with these imperfect tools my noodles were perfect. I was able to just tilt the pan until the batter was covering the entire area, which made them fairly thin and a few on one side were over-done but still were fine in my faux chicken faux noodle soup. They cut easily and slid right off the paper. My kids had nothing bad to say either! I will make them thicker next time for eating in a sauce as they are fairly soft but did hold up in the soup and even by lunch today were still great. Thank you!
The ketogenic diet, or keto, relies on using your fat as fuel, instead of glucose from carbohydrates or protein. Simply put, the daily ketogenic diet consists of 75 percent fat, 20 percent of protein, and a teeny allotment of carbohydrates, about 5 percent. This balance of macronutrients is intended to put your body in a state of ketosis, which suppresses the release of insulin and blood glucose levels. The benefits of ketosis to your health are improvements in biomarkers like blood glucose, reduction of blood pressure and decreased appetite due to fullness linked to consumption of fats.
Hi Vivian – I am 60 yo and researching Keto and would love more information from you since we are same age. What is TDEE? What fat sources do you use and how much daily? What are some meals you make regularly and what does a day of food look like? What is the easiest/best way to count carbs getting started? If you and Brenda are ok with you giving me your email I would love to learn more from you! I just need some help getting started. Brenda – thank you for all your information and recipes!
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