If you're in search of carb-free noodles that perfectly mimic the taste and texture of regular spaghetti -- a true miracle -- keep looking. Like pasta, shirataki noodles are mostly neutral in flavor and can absorb the tastes you cook with. But, shirataki has a slimier consistency and you won't be able to choose the hardness of your pasta -- al dente or otherwise -- because the noodles are already "cooked."
These tasty mini burgers are perfect for parties because they can feed your low carb AND carb-loving guests and no one will even miss that bread. Make them for tailgating parties, game day parties, summer picnics, or just a fun weeknight dinner for the family. Once you dip those little burger bites in that special sauce you’re going to be going back for seconds!
Hi, I’m still a bit skeptical, I have seen some of my friends do the keto diet, and have had good results. Though I am still not sure about the idea of the fats being eaten. They say they eat meat with the fat and must do so, is this correct? Also isn’t this not good for the body especially for the kidneys? Second, can a diabetic do this diet? There are many questions running through my head.
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This granola is delicious, after making it several times I decided to add some shredded coconut, sesame and 100% maple syrup and it turned out a winner. Now I use different types of nuts depending what I have at home. Some times I slice it into bars and take with me to work and my daughter loves to take them to school. By the way, I made the granola with all raw nuts and it only took about 15 min baking time at 180•C.

i made these for my husband and me today. I used a blue silicone donut pan that i purchased from amazon. I followed the recipe exactly. I oiled the pan with coconut oil. I let the batter sit for 10 minutes before putting it in pan, like one of the other comments suggested. I let it cool for 20 minutes and they came right out…perfect. He had one at 3:00 and just now another at 9:00. He’s not happy about being on keto most days, but his comment after eating both times was: good, very very good! Thank you so much for sharing your life and time with us.

"Avoid inflammatory oils like safflower, sunflower, corn, or soybean oils and opt for whole food cereal or granolas with limited ingredients, which tend to be made from nuts, seeds and occasionally whole oats or puffed rice," says Kelly LeVeque, RD, a celebrity nutritionist who works with Jennifer Garner and Jessica Alba, and author of Body Love. One of her faves: This grain-free granola from Thrive Market, which has a blissfully short ingredient list but tons of flavor.
I was a Corpsman (not a corpse-man as some recent somewhat fanatical president would say), and I can tell you many stories of Marines and Sailors who maintained restrictive diets (aka picky eaters). Most obvious was lack of sustaining energy (hypoglycemia) at mile 15 (with 80lbs of gear including a 6.5lb rifle and 200 rnds of ammo, etc.) and depletion of essential vitamins, electrolyte imbalance. They were always the first to collapse and have to hear me scold “see I told you so.” An IV of D5W usually does the trick (D is for dextrose, OMG!)
Love your blog and recipes, thank you! Congratulations on doing keto – I’ve been sugar, dairy, grain and pretty much all carb free for over a year keeping my carbs to under 30 grams per day. My question is about coffee…did you give it up? I was drinking way too much coffee with heavy cream so I finally gave that up for Califia almond/coconut creamer sugar free of course! Did you give up coffee during the keto trial?
Ketogenesis results in the production of ketone bodies, a product of fatty acid catabolism performed primarily by the liver, in the absence of adequate CHO availability. Three primary ketone bodies are produced; acetone, acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate. Even though trace amounts of ketones are always present in the blood, it is only during periods of inadequate CHO availability that significant ketone production will occur. This accumulation of ketone bodies in the blood is commonly referred to as ketosis.
A common question is whether you can substitute almond flour for coconut flour and the other way around. Yes, often you can but not in equal amounts. 1 cup of almond flour can be substituted for 1/3 cup of coconut flour. 1/3 cup of coconut flour can be substituted for 2/3 cup almond flour + 1.5 tablespoons of ground psyllium husk powder. The amounts may need to be adjusted depending on what brands you’re using.

Well there are plenty low-carb bread options out there nowadays–we keep adding to this list of great low-carb breads–but what do you do about those pasta cravings? While a traditional slice of bread will pack 16 grams of carbs or more per slice, a serving of pasta is no joke! At 40+ grams of carbs for one cup of pasta, it is not easy on the blood sugar!

Health's contributing nutrition editor Cynthia Sass, RD, MPH, suggests looking for cereals that are made with nuts, seeds, coconut, a little bit of fruit, natural sweetener (think honey or agave syrup) instead of added sugar, and spices for flavor. Although many of these cereals may be gluten- or grain-free, you can also look for flaked whole grain varieties.
Hi Bill, Sorry to hear that. I haven’t experienced that before. Usually, if bread falls during baking it’s too much baking powder, but if it falls after baking it’s just not baked long enough. So you could try both less baking powder and increasing the baking time. Finally, this recipe uses baking powder, not baking soda, so if you used baking soda that could be the issue as well.
During the 1920s and 1930s, when the only anticonvulsant drugs were the sedative bromides (discovered 1857) and phenobarbital (1912), the ketogenic diet was widely used and studied. This changed in 1938 when H. Houston Merritt, Jr. and Tracy Putnam discovered phenytoin (Dilantin), and the focus of research shifted to discovering new drugs. With the introduction of sodium valproate in the 1970s, drugs were available to neurologists that were effective across a broad range of epileptic syndromes and seizure types. The use of the ketogenic diet, by this time restricted to difficult cases such as Lennox–Gastaut syndrome, declined further.[10]
Over the long-term the KD poses possible risks as well, although the evidence remains unclear on this topic. Consumption of a high fat diet, particularly saturated fat, is associated with increased cardiovascular risk (23) and consumption of saturated fat has been shown to acutely induce insulin resistance and raise blood triglyceride levels (12). Nevertheless, many KD studies have documented improvements in markers of cardiovascular risk, including improvements in vascular function (24) reduction in inflammatory markers (10), and other markers of cardiovascular health (13,20). Methodological issues, such as clear definitions of dietary interventions, may play a significant role in obscuring the underlying principles, however, it is clear that more targeted research is warranted.

The ketosis produced by fasting or limiting carbohydrate intake does not have negative effects for most people once the body has adapted to that state. The ketosis caused by diet has been referred to as dietary ketosis, physiological ketosis, benign dietary ketosis (Atkins), and, most recently, nutritional ketosis (Phinney and Volek), in an attempt to clear up possible confusion with diabetic ketoacidosis.
You’re transitioning. Your body is equipped to process a high intake of carbs and a lower intake of fat. Your body needs to create enzymes to be able to do this. In the transitional period, the brain may run low on energy which can lead to grogginess, nausea, and headaches. If you’re having a large problem with this, you can choose to reduce carb intake gradually.
Low Carb FoodsLow Carb MixesLow Carb BarsLow Carb BreadsLow Carb BrowniesLow Carb Cakes - PiesLow Carb CandyLow Carb CerealLow Carb ChocolateLow Carb CondimentsLow Carb CookiesLow Carb EntreesLow Carb MuffinsLow Carb PastaLow Carb PastriesLow Carb SnacksDiet FoodsHealthy MixesHealthy BarsHealthy BreadsHealthy BrowniesHealthy Cakes - PiesHealthy CandyHealthy CerealHealthy ChocolateHealthy CondimentsHealthy CookiesHealthy EntreesHealthy Frozen FoodHealthy MuffinsHealthy PastaHealthy PastriesHealthy Peanut ButterHealthy Snack FoodsSupplements
Still, whole wheat flour comes in about midway on our list of flours based on carbohydrate content, so it’s got a little less than 45 carbohydrates per half cup, and comes in mid-range for GI at 69, You may find that you want to sneak whole wheat flour into your recipes, by adding a little at a time and working up to where you have mostly whole-wheat bread.
Hi Carleen, I wouldn’t recommend unblanched almond flour. It might be ok but the texture will be much worse than using finely ground blanched. I haven’t tried the recipe with flax but I expect that it will work better with psyllium, which provides that chewy bread texture and flax doesn’t do that. If you don’t want to use coconut oil, I’d recommend butter or ghee over vegetable oils. The almond flour biscuits should work fine as toppings.
Thank you, Wenda! Yes, the nutrition info is based on 6 donuts. If you keep the ingredients the same but make more (smaller) donuts out of them, the macronutrients per donut would be lower. If you just multiply the ingredients by 4 to make 24 donuts that are the same size as mine (increase the # of servings on the recipe card to 24), then the nutrition info per donut would stay the same.
Since the ingredients are eggs and cream cheese, and the recipe for scrambled eggs or an omelette is eggs and cream or milk, which is almost the same, the taste is going to be eggy. Adding gluten,which has no taste, is not going to change the flavor. I thought it might change the texture, but it didn’t do that either. How it’s mixed, baked, or simmered isn’t going to change the flavor either.
However, replacing high carb flours like all-purpose flour, wheat flour, corn flour, and rice flour with low-carb flour is not as simple as just using one for the other. Due to the difference in composition between high-carb and low-carb flours, you will need to use different amounts of low-carb flour together with other essential ingredients that you don’t typically find in traditional baking recipes like psyllium husk, xanthan gum, and protein powder.
Also, I wanted to let you know what a fabulous addition your recipes were to our Christmas. I made the orange spritz cookies which were well received by those with diabetes, my gluten free friends, and everyone! I made them Christmas Eve. Christmas morning, I made your apple coffee cake and it was fab along with eggs, sausage and fruit. Thank you so much!
I’ve made them so far only once and they turned out great!!! I was able to roll the sheet up like a jelly roll and cut them so they were long noodles. I used them for spaghetti. Yummylicious ???? Also reheated them in the microwave the next day with no prob. I am planning on lasagna this week and can’t wait. I’m also going to make tuna casserole-the idea put in my head from reading your posts. I will also try some garlic powder just for fun. You are a very tolerate person for so many ridiculous posts I’ve read. I am very grateful I have found your site and am a forever fan????
Carolyn Ketchum writes All Day I Dream About Food, a food blog that focuses primarily on low carb, gluten free recipes. She has a Masters in Physical Anthropology and Human Evolution from Arizona State University and has an extensive background in higher education administration. She currently lives in the Boston area with her husband and three children. You can check out her experiments with low carb baking at All Day I Dream About Food.
Looking for that hearty crunch that’s packed full of flavor? Look no more. Instead of cracking open a box of Ritz or Cheez-Its, go ahead and make your own! You can make crackers from anything including flaxseed meal (featured in The RULED Book), chia seeds, or even almond flour to make your own homemade crunchy snacks with a delicious flavor of your own.
The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was developed for treatment of paediatric epilepsy in the 1920s and was widely used into the next decade, but its popularity waned with the introduction of effective anticonvulsant medications. This classic ketogenic diet contains a 4:1 ratio by weight of fat to combined protein and carbohydrate. This is achieved by excluding high-carbohydrate foods such as starchy fruits and vegetables, bread, pasta, grains, and sugar, while increasing the consumption of foods high in fat such as nuts, cream, and butter.[1] Most dietary fat is made of molecules called long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). However, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs)—made from fatty acids with shorter carbon chains than LCTs—are more ketogenic. A variant of the classic diet known as the MCT ketogenic diet uses a form of coconut oil, which is rich in MCTs, to provide around half the calories. As less overall fat is needed in this variant of the diet, a greater proportion of carbohydrate and protein can be consumed, allowing a greater variety of food choices.[4][5]
While there are many different types of pasta today, the classic cooked, unenriched traditional pasta is about 30 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams. That’s your entire daily carbohydrate intake on the ketogenic diet, if you’re lucky. After that comes a minuscule 0.9 grams of fat, about 6 grams of protein and minimal micronutrients. Even whole wheat pasta, advertised as a health food, contains 37 grams of total carbohydrates[*].
The following measurements were made every other week: anthropometric and vital sign measurements; urine testing for ketones; and assessment for hypoglycemic episodes and other symptomatic side effects. Weight was measured on a standardized digital scale while the participant was wearing light clothes and shoes were removed. Skinfold thickness was measured at 4 sites – the average of 2 measurements at each site was entered into an equation to calculate percent body fat [12]. Waist circumference was measured at the midpoint between the inferior rib and the iliac crest using an inelastic tape; 2 measurements were averaged in the analysis. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured after the participant had been seated quietly without talking for 3 minutes. Certified laboratory technicians assessed urine ketones from a fresh specimen using the following semi-quantitative scale: none, trace (up to 0.9 mmol/L [5 mg/dL]), small (0.9–6.9 mmol/L [5–40 mg/dL]), moderate (6.9–13.8 mmol/L [40–80 mg/dL]), large80 (13.8–27.5 mmol/L [80–160 mg/dL]), large160 (>27.5 mmol/L [160 mg/dL]). Hypoglycemic episodes and symptomatic side effects were assessed by direct questioning of the participant and by self-administered questionnaires.

Wilder's colleague, paediatrician Mynie Gustav Peterman, later formulated the classic diet, with a ratio of one gram of protein per kilogram of body weight in children, 10–15 g of carbohydrate per day, and the remainder of calories from fat. Peterman's work in the 1920s established the techniques for induction and maintenance of the diet. Peterman documented positive effects (improved alertness, behaviour, and sleep) and adverse effects (nausea and vomiting due to excess ketosis). The diet proved to be very successful in children: Peterman reported in 1925 that 95% of 37 young patients had improved seizure control on the diet and 60% became seizure-free. By 1930, the diet had also been studied in 100 teenagers and adults. Clifford Joseph Barborka, Sr., also from the Mayo Clinic, reported that 56% of those older patients improved on the diet and 12% became seizure-free. Although the adult results are similar to modern studies of children, they did not compare as well to contemporary studies. Barborka concluded that adults were least likely to benefit from the diet, and the use of the ketogenic diet in adults was not studied again until 1999.[10][14]
From pancakes to muffins, quick breads, cookies, cakes, pie crusts and sandwich bread, low-carb baked goods are all possible with a low-carb flour. You'll have to do some experimenting to see which flour is right for your specific baked products, and be prepared for both successes and failures. An all-purpose, low-carbohydrate blend takes much of the guess work out of the equation, but also removes the adventure from your quest. Be sure to follow all directions when replacing all or some regular flour with a low-carb variety.
Fat is an important energy source; however, it plays a secondary role as an energy substrate, particularly during exercise that exceeds moderate intensity. For example, one of the fundamental concepts of bioenergetics illustrates this point through the axiom “fat burns in a carbohydrate flame;” clearly emphasizing the important role of CHO in energy metabolism. In the absence of adequate CHO availability, as might occur during starvation, near the end of a long endurance event or CHO-restricting diet, the body must turn to an alternate source to maintain energy for all tissues. Under normal dietary conditions there is a steady supply of glucose which the body readily uses as a primary fuel.
Sunflower seed meal and pumpkin seed meal are ideal options for those who are allergic to any of the nut flours we mentioned above. These seed flours are high in vitamins and minerals such as vitamin E, copper, thiamine, selenium, and phosphorus, and relatively low in net carbs (less than five net carbs in every 1-ounce serving), making them a healthy keto-friendly option.
Non-GMO low-carb pastas are a good option if you're concerned about the potential effects on your health of consuming genetically altered ingredients. Though there are competing views in the scientific community with regard to the long-term safety of regular GMO consumption, many choose to eat only non-GMO products as an extra-cautious measure. Similarly, organic low-carb pastas that include ingredients that haven't been treated with or exposed to chemicals are easy to find. 
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