I have made this twice, both in the microwave. I have a tall coffee mug and it seems to work fine. I used Golden Monk Fruit Sweetener once and Swerve confectioners once and both were good. First time I microwaved for a full minute – a little dry but still delicious. Second time for 55 seconds and still a tad dry, but again, still delicious. Next time, I’ll shoot for 50 seconds!

Hi! My donuts are in the oven right now, but they are spreading too much & not rising. Almost running off the donut pan. I only filled them 3/4 full as you show in the video. I doubled the recipe using the above calculator. I know I followed it exactly. Any idea of what I did wrong? The batter tasted yummy and so did the finished product, the donuts just weren’t as pretty as yours.

The concept of a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) is not new (e.g., the Atkins Diet Revolution was first published in 1972), however, there has been a surge of public interest over the last decade in carbohydrate-restricting diets. One particular type of LCD, the ketogenic diet (KD), has shown promise for its purported ability to aid in weight management. Achieving and maintaining significant weight loss over the long-term remains a very elusive endeavor. Low-carbohydrate diets (LCD) have demonstrated promise in this regard and may hold certain advantages over traditional calorie-restricted dietary strategies.
Almond flour is a great low carb pasta alternative. It contains 1.6 grams of carbohydrates and 1.6 grams of dietary fiber, resulting in zero net carbs[*]. White, bleached, enriched flour contains over 76 grams of total carbohydrates with only 2 grams of fiber[*]. Almonds are also an excellent source of healthy fats, vitamin E, manganese and magnesium[*].
However, replacing high carb flours like all-purpose flour, wheat flour, corn flour, and rice flour with low-carb flour is not as simple as just using one for the other. Due to the difference in composition between high-carb and low-carb flours, you will need to use different amounts of low-carb flour together with other essential ingredients that you don’t typically find in traditional baking recipes like psyllium husk, xanthan gum, and protein powder.
Blood specimens were obtained at weeks 0, 8, and 16 after the participant had fasted overnight. The following serum tests were performed in the hospital laboratory using standardized methods: complete blood count, chemistry panel, lipid panel, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and uric acid. A non-fasting specimen was also drawn at weeks 4 and 12 to monitor electrolytes and kidney function.
There is also a common worry the ketogenic diet may cause ketoacidosis, which occurs when the acidity in the blood increases. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition caused by very high blood sugars and a deficiency of insulin in insulin-dependent diabetics, a very different state from ketones produced by a fat-burning metabolism on a low-carb, high-fat diet.
If you're in search of carb-free noodles that perfectly mimic the taste and texture of regular spaghetti -- a true miracle -- keep looking. Like pasta, shirataki noodles are mostly neutral in flavor and can absorb the tastes you cook with. But, shirataki has a slimier consistency and you won't be able to choose the hardness of your pasta -- al dente or otherwise -- because the noodles are already "cooked."
Hi Cyn, The numbers are general guidelines but will vary depending on many factors, such as activity level, insulin resistance, weight and more. There is no single magic number, just conventional recommendations that are a good starting point. I will have a macro calculator coming soon that will help determine what is best for each person, but even then it’s an approximation. The only way to know for sure is to test. If keto is your goal, it’s usually best to start lower and then see if you can stay in ketosis when increasing.
Here are a few of the most common side effects that I come across when people first start keto. Frequently the issues relate to dehydration or lack of micronutrients (vitamins) in the body. Make sure that you’re drinking enough water (close to a gallon a day) and eating foods with good sources of micronutrients. To read more on micronutrients, click here >
Y. Wady Aude, MD; Arthur S. Agatston, MD; Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, MD, MSc; Eric H. Lieberman, MD; Marie Almon, MS, RD; Melinda Hansen, ARNP; Gerardo Rojas, MD; Gervasio A. Lamas, MD; Charles H. Hennekens, MD, DrPH, “The National Cholesterol Education Program Diet vs a Diet Lower in Carbohydrates and Higher in Protein and Monounsaturated Fat,” Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(19):2141-2146. http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=217514.

Thank you! I think though many doctors and nutritionists are not keto friendly at all. They still believe in moderation and that grains are important, my own hubby’s doctor, same thing. That way of eating has failed for so many of us, even my husband. I think the keto diet is especially helpful if you’re in pre-menopausal, but that’s just my 2 cents. I’d say do more research. I’v found Dr.Jockers on youtube and Dr.Eric berg to have sound advice.
While there are many different types of pasta today, the classic cooked, unenriched traditional pasta is about 30 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams. That’s your entire daily carbohydrate intake on the ketogenic diet, if you’re lucky. After that comes a minuscule 0.9 grams of fat, about 6 grams of protein and minimal micronutrients. Even whole wheat pasta, advertised as a health food, contains 37 grams of total carbohydrates[*].
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