Thanks for this inputs. 20 years ago I gain 17 pounds a year for 5 years. I was healthy but my dr told me start diet, any diet just come back in a month I want to see you start loosing… I started Atkins and lost 7 pound in a month. She was checking my progress every six months and checking my condition. I lost 64 pounds in 3 years. Now I started eating out of control. I am eating healthy but too much… I gain 40 pound back after 20 years. Now I will start again my Atkins to take off 30 pounds… 

Also, I wanted to let you know what a fabulous addition your recipes were to our Christmas. I made the orange spritz cookies which were well received by those with diabetes, my gluten free friends, and everyone! I made them Christmas Eve. Christmas morning, I made your apple coffee cake and it was fab along with eggs, sausage and fruit. Thank you so much!
The ketogenic diet is a medical nutrition therapy that involves participants from various disciplines. Team members include a registered paediatric dietitian who coordinates the diet programme; a paediatric neurologist who is experienced in offering the ketogenic diet; and a registered nurse who is familiar with childhood epilepsy. Additional help may come from a medical social worker who works with the family and a pharmacist who can advise on the carbohydrate content of medicines. Lastly, the parents and other caregivers must be educated in many aspects of the diet for it to be safely implemented.[5]

Long-term use of the ketogenic diet in children increases the risk of slowed or stunted growth, bone fractures, and kidney stones.[18] The diet reduces levels of insulin-like growth factor 1, which is important for childhood growth. Like many anticonvulsant drugs, the ketogenic diet has an adverse effect on bone health. Many factors may be involved such as acidosis and suppressed growth hormone.[38] About one in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones (compared with one in several thousand for the general population). A class of anticonvulsants known as carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (topiramate, zonisamide) are known to increase the risk of kidney stones, but the combination of these anticonvulsants and the ketogenic diet does not appear to elevate the risk above that of the diet alone.[39] The stones are treatable and do not justify discontinuation of the diet.[39] Johns Hopkins Hospital now gives oral potassium citrate supplements to all ketogenic diet patients, resulting in one-seventh of the incidence of kidney stones.[40] However, this empiric usage has not been tested in a prospective controlled trial.[9] Kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis) is associated with the diet for four reasons:[39]
Several recent studies indicate that a low-carbohydrate diet is effective at improving glycemia. A few studies have shown that in non-diabetic individuals, low-carbohydrate diets were more effective than higher carbohydrate diets at improving fasting serum glucose [13,14] and insulin [6,14-16], and at improving insulin sensitivity as measured by the homeostasis model [6]. One of these studies also included diabetic patients and noted a comparative improvement in hemoglobin A1c after 6 months (low fat diet: 0.0 ± 1.0%; low carbohydrate diet: -0.6 ± 1.2%, p = 0.06) [6] and 12 months (low fat diet: -0.1 ± 1.6%; low carbohydrate diet: -0.7 ± 1.0%, p = 0.019) duration [5]. In a 5-week crossover feeding study, 8 men with type 2 diabetes had greater improvement in fasting glucose, 24-hour glucose area-under-the-curve (AUC), 24-hour insulin AUC, and glycohemoglobin while on the low-carbohydrate diet than when on a eucaloric low-fat diet [7]. In a 14-day inpatient feeding study, 10 participants with type 2 diabetes experienced improvements in hemoglobin A1c and insulin sensitivity as measured by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp method [8]. Hemoglobin A1c also improved in an outpatient study of 16 participants who followed a 20% carbohydrate diet for 24 weeks [9].

Thanks for posting about the psyllium Sarah,, I tried psyllium flakes 10g and they turned out great. Not even very fragile. It just gets thick so the batter doesn’t self-level, I had to do my best, and the thick spots required 1 extra minute in the oven. Used immediately in a skillet lasagne- just ground beef, jar of pasta sauce, mozz cheese and cream cheese. Definitely wouldn’t have been much of a lasagne without the “pasta”! So these noodles are my hero 🙂
Coconut flour is made from dehydrated coconut meat after most its fat has been extracted to produce coconut oil.  Each 1/4 cup of coconut flour contains 60 calories, 2.5 g of fat, 6 g of protein, 19 g of carbohydrates, 12 g of fiber, and 7 g of net carbs. Due to its high fiber content, this low-carb flour is perfect for anyone who needs a digestive health boost.
If no food processor is at hand, you can also do it by hand (it just takes a little more time and arm muscle!). Add all the dry ingredients to a large bowl and whisk until thoroughly combined. Pour in vinegar and whisk until thoroughly distributed. Pour in egg while whisking vigorously and keep whisking until the dough becomes too stiff to whisk. Using your hands, knead the dough until thoroughly incorporated, adding a teaspoon of water at a time as needed (we use 2). 
Before you fast, consult your health care provider to ensure it is a safe exercise for you. After confirming you can safely fast, I recommend kicking off a ketogenic diet with a 24-48 hour fast, during which time you consume nothing but water—but make sure you drink plenty of it. Once your body is in ketosis and you shift to maintenance mode, I suggest fasting once or twice a year for the same period of time and with the same, water-only restrictions. While fasting can be challenging, especially in the beginning, if you stick with it you can reap huge benefits.
With all the options, most of you ought to be able to mix and match your way to 8 to 10 grams of fiber at breakfast without much hassle at all. That's oatmeal with flaxseeds and almonds, a vegetable frittata with some berries on the side or whole-grain toast with natural peanut butter. And just so you know we're flexible: There's no rule against having any of these fiber-rich goodies for lunch!
The ketogenic diet has been studied in at least 14 rodent animal models of seizures. It is protective in many of these models and has a different protection profile than any known anticonvulsant. Conversely, fenofibrate, not used clinically as an antiepileptic, exhibits experimental anticonvulsant properties in adult rats comparable to the ketogenic diet.[58] This, together with studies showing its efficacy in patients who have failed to achieve seizure control on half a dozen drugs, suggests a unique mechanism of action.[56]
The Johns Hopkins Hospital protocol for initiating the ketogenic diet has been widely adopted.[43] It involves a consultation with the patient and their caregivers and, later, a short hospital admission.[19] Because of the risk of complications during ketogenic diet initiation, most centres begin the diet under close medical supervision in the hospital.[9]
So glad to hear that I’m not the only one that’s not dropping pounds/inches like gangbusters…I’ve been “pretty” low carb/keto, lift twice a week and cardio 3 other days and nothing…nothing happens. I’d like to lose 10-15 pounds and just can’t seem to get anywhere…55…post menopausal. I’d say that my carbs are generally around 30 per day or less and I do IF. Love to hear your thoughts.

The goal of the KD is to sufficiently deprive the body of CHO to achieve physiological or “nutritional ketosis,” a metabolic state which is characterized by blood ketone levels between 0.5 and 3.0 mmol/L (26). This “switch over” point, however, is not seamless and may take up to several weeks for individuals to become “keto adapted” (18). Supporting this idea is a significant amount evidence indicating that a “keto adapted” body has little reliance on glucose for CNS function (8,14,16) or as a source of energy for exercise (17,18,25,27).

As ingested CHO is broken down by the stomach and absorbed through the small intestine, rising blood sugar creates a feedback loop which results in secretion of insulin. The primary role of insulin is to “dispose” of excess blood sugar by signaling tissues to “uptake” more glucose from the circulating supply. In this manner insulin serves a prominent role in glucose regulation. This concept also provides the basis for the glycemic index, a concept which attempts to quantify the impact CHO foods have on blood sugar response. For example, foods rich in simple CHO (i.e., “sugars”), which are absorbed quickly, trigger a rapid rise in blood sugar (and subsequently insulin response), whereas foods rich in complex CHO, such as fiber-rich legumes, exert a relatively blunted response on blood glucose.

^ Ketogenic "eggnog" is used during induction and is a drink with the required ketogenic ratio. For example, a 4:1 ratio eggnog would contain 60 g of 36% heavy whipping cream, 25 g pasteurised raw egg, saccharin and vanilla flavour. This contains 245 kcal (1,025 kJ), 4 g protein, 2 g carbohydrate and 24 g fat (24:6 = 4:1).[17] The eggnog may also be cooked to make a custard, or frozen to make ice cream.[37]

Rest assured, not everyone experiences this side effect of the ketogenic diet and, if you do, it will abate on its own; furthermore, there are some simple preventative steps you can take to lower your likelihood of “catching” this flu. As you adopt a ketogenic diet, make sure you replace electrolytes, eat enough fat to meet your total caloric needs, drink plenty of water, and exercise as you are able. It’s very important, however, to ensure that you aren’t relying on sugary sports drinks to replace electrolytes, as all that added sugar will prevent your metabolism from entering ketosis. Ultimately, electrolytes play a crucial role in our health and many Americans do not consume them at adequate levels, so it is very important to monitor your intake of these nutrients regardless of whether or not you are an adherent of the ketogenic diet.
I think these are unbelievable! This is actually the first time I've written a review on Amazon, but I feel like I have to with these. I am trying to do a low carb/low cal diet to lose about 30 pounds, and have a huge weakness for pasta. I have tried Shirataki noodles, spaghetti squash, skipping the pasta altogether and just making veggies with sauce, and this is BY FAR the best way to quench my craving for pasta.

Increases in cholesterol levels need discussion too. We do see temporary increases in cholesterol levels often as individuals transition onto a ketogenic diet. However, when you examine lipid particle size (a more important way to look at the cardiovascular risks), the risk pattern doesn’t seem to increase with a ketogenic diet. Harvard Health has written about lipid particle size here before: http://www.health.harvard.edu/womens-health/should-you-seek-advanced-cholesterol-testing-
I had to make a few changes though. First, what makes a donut taste like a donut is nutmeg. I added a few gratings and cut the cinnamon down to about half. Second, I live in South Korea and almond milk almost always contains sugar and is very expensive. I used heavy cream and then added a splash of water when the batter was very thick. Third, I don’t have erythritol, but I do have a stevia and erythritol blend so I used that.
Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.
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