Hi! I tried making the bread using my homemade almond flour left over from the almond milk pulp (I dry it and then blend it). The batter wasn’t as wet as yours in the video and it didn’t rise at all and was very dense. Since it wasn’t that wet I couldn’t mix it enough to get air bubbles. My baking powder isn’t fresh so maybe that’s the cause like you said. Since it wasn’t fresh I did add 1 tsp. baking soda and 2 tsp of apple cider vinegar. Also, my almond flour doesn’t look as light and fluffy as yours.
Almond flour is available in supermarkets and grocery stores, but you can find it for the lowest price when you buy it in bulk online. Make sure you purchase the finest blanched almond flour that has no darker specks of skin. The finer the grind of the almond flour, the finer the consistency of your baked goods and the easier it will be for your food to rise.
It's worth noting that many low-carb diets vary in their intake requirements. For instance, the Atkins diet recommends eating less than 100 grams of carbs a day, while the Mayo Clinic points out that any diet is considered low in carbs if it falls under the Dietary Guidelines for Americans' recommendation to consume 900 to 1300 calories of carbohydrates per day (or 45% to 65% of your total calories, based on a 2000 calorie diet).

This is the best! I’m really bad at baking but I have made this twice and both times it was perfect. I’ve shared it with all my gluten intolerant friends, thank you. Oh, I reduced the psyllium husk to an eighth and replaced the other eighth with gluten free flour. It made it less gritty. Yummy! Today I’m going to add some spices and sultanas for a sweet treat. Hope it works!
Hello, I found your recipes after reading A Year of No Sugar by Eva Schaub and needing some delicious sugar free recipes. I recently decided to try keto and am almost done a 2 week challenge (more low carb than true keto but have kept the carbs below 70g, except 1 day). My questions are is alcohol allowed in your view? I’m not a huge drinker but I do like a glass of wine with dinner. What about “cheat” days. I’m not planning to go back to eating all the processed foods but denying them completely seems pretty counter intuitive and I’m hoping for ideas. Last question, what about fruit? How can any food plan completely rule out fruit? That also seems unhealthy and I’m wondering if you think ekto should be used as a temporary weight loss plan, with low carb being the longer term plan? Thank you! And you look amazing in the photos.
I really appreciate this article. I have done low Carb for the most part for over 15 years and was able to keep my weight down. Now that I have gone through menopause is just keeps getting harder. I try doing keto but tend to fall off the wagon a lot and go back to low Carb or Weight Watchers. Simple ideas would be great. I think some keto bloggers make it seem that you have to create difficult recipes. Thanks for all you do.
I recently started using Carbquik and overall, I'm pleased with it. I'm on a low-carb diet, and my dining options have really opened up! So far, I've made cheese biscuits, pizza dough, and pancakes. The pizza dough isn't great, but if you use the right kind of pizza pan and roll it thin enough, it's certainly acceptable and it beats not being able to have pizza at all.
After trying literally DOZENS of Keto bread recipes, I have FINALLY found something I can use as a burger bun! Other recipes were great for biscuits or rolls and such, but didn’t work for a burger bun – and SO EASILY! I added a tiny bit of garlic powder and topped them with TJ Everything Bagel spice, baked them in a muffin top pan and they are AWESOME! Finally – after all this time having to have my cheeseburger without a bun – last night I had a burger AND a bun! Woohoo!!! Next time I will try adding some yeast, just for the flavor. THANK YOU SO MUCH for the GREAT recipe!!!
When you are eating breakfast on the ketogenic diet, there is always the need to balance things up. For beginners and everyone else, balancing things means taking moderate volume of each nutrient contained in the foods you eat. Many of the times the only food available at breakfast is a grab and go option like fruit or a bar loaded with sugar. And that’s where low carb cereal comes in. They can help to bring great balance to your diet. 
Coconut flour and almond flour are two of the most commonly used flour alternatives in low carb cooking and baking. Most people have a preference of one over the other. I will admit that my go-to is almond flour much of the time because I’ve become so comfortable with it. Or a mix of the two, which I find can give keto cakes and muffins a really great consistency. But I do love my coconut flour pancakes! And I  love to experiment and play with all my options…coconut flour, almond flour, peanut flour, sunflower seed flour…you name it, I’ve tried it (and if I haven’t, I certainly intend to!).

Almond flour recipes typically require more eggs and more leavening agent to help them rise properly. I also like to add a little dry protein, like whey protein powder, as I find this can help [with rising?].  Almond flour recipes may also contain less oil and liquid as well, to account for the high fat content of the nuts. In my experience, low carb, gluten-free batters are thicker than their conventional counterparts. Resist the urge to thin them out, as you may end up with a soggy mess.


I made these this morning but subbed coconut milk in for the almond milk since I didn’t have any on hand. I also used a little less sugar substitute since I hate that cooling effect it has and I added some ground cloves and nutmeg. They were SO good! I’ve tried a few keto recipes and have not had too much success, but this one is GREAT! Even my son who is super picky really loved them.
The classic ketogenic diet is not a balanced diet and only contains tiny portions of fresh fruit and vegetables, fortified cereals, and calcium-rich foods. In particular, the B vitamins, calcium, and vitamin D must be artificially supplemented. This is achieved by taking two sugar-free supplements designed for the patient's age: a multivitamin with minerals and calcium with vitamin D.[18] A typical day of food for a child on a 4:1 ratio, 1,500 kcal (6,300 kJ) ketogenic diet comprises three small meals and three small snacks:[28]
The ketogenic diet is indicated as an adjunctive (additional) treatment in children and young people with drug-resistant epilepsy.[26][27] It is approved by national clinical guidelines in Scotland,[27] England, and Wales[26] and reimbursed by nearly all US insurance companies.[28] Children with a focal lesion (a single point of brain abnormality causing the epilepsy) who would make suitable candidates for surgery are more likely to become seizure-free with surgery than with the ketogenic diet.[9][29] About a third of epilepsy centres that offer the ketogenic diet also offer a dietary therapy to adults. Some clinicians consider the two less restrictive dietary variants—the low glycaemic index treatment and the modified Atkins diet—to be more appropriate for adolescents and adults.[9] A liquid form of the ketogenic diet is particularly easy to prepare for, and well tolerated by, infants on formula and children who are tube-fed.[5][30]

Although the KD has shown promise as an alternative dietary strategy for weight management, it should be approached with caution. Acutely, the KD causes physiological changes which may manifest as the “keto flu,” a set of symptoms which commonly includes headache, nausea, gastrointestinal upset and fatigue. A recent study by Urbain et al. (22) illustrates this point, as they state, “Consistent with other studies, our subjects complained about headache, gastrointestinal symptoms, and general weakness mainly during the 1-week metabolic adaptation phase to a KD.” While these symptoms typically resolve within the first one to two weeks, this may present an unpleasant barrier for many individuals to overcome.


Made them tonight. I thought I messed them up since they looked eggy but really they turned out great. I can’t do gluten so I tried the xanthum and I also added some garlic powder to the mix for taste.i think I cooked for 7 minutes total.we actually sliced them into little squares and threw them into homemade chicken noodle soup. It tasted close to dumpling style noodles. Not slick/chewy but very good. My 14 year old T1 loved them and wants me to make more. Overall it absolutely loved these. Will be making again in the very near future. Thanks for such a great and simple recipe!

Hi Mel, Assuming that your ranch dressing doesn’t have sugar added, you don’t need to worry too much about limiting it, but within reason. This is my homemade ranch dressing recipe, which has 0.9g net carbs per 2-tbsp serving. It would be hard to find a store bought one with much less than that, even though some round anything less than 1g down to 0g, which isn’t truly accurate. Also, keep in mind that if weight loss is your goal, some people find that too much dairy can cause a stall. Finally, make sure you aren’t using all your “available” carbs on ranch dressing – have it with some low carb veggies!
Hi Cyn, The numbers are general guidelines but will vary depending on many factors, such as activity level, insulin resistance, weight and more. There is no single magic number, just conventional recommendations that are a good starting point. I will have a macro calculator coming soon that will help determine what is best for each person, but even then it’s an approximation. The only way to know for sure is to test. If keto is your goal, it’s usually best to start lower and then see if you can stay in ketosis when increasing.

To make cocoa puff balls (takes a LOT more time, but they’re REALLY fun): pinch a little thumbnail sized amount of dough and roll between your hands to form a ball. Place on the baking sheet. Bake for 8 minutes, then take baking sheet from oven and carefully move the balls around so they cook on the other side. Place bake in the oven and cook another 5 minutes. Allow to cool and enjoy!
Elisabeth Almekinder, a certified CDE and expert in Diabetes Self-Management Education Program, grew up in a small town in the piedmont of NC. During her time at St. Andrews Presbyterian College, she developed a love of writing and obtained a BA in English. After obtaining her nursing degree, her first job out of school was on the vascular surgery floor, where she saw many people with diabetes lose their limbs. She worked as an RN for 22 years in public health in South Carolina. In her spare time away from educating people about diabetes, she continues her passion by writing about diabetes.

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.
×