I’ve been doing keto on and off for a year. Before that, I explored eliminating “inflammatory” or “reactive” foods based on another eating program. I have Celiac and autoimmune issues and I think one of the reasons people stall with Keto is because they are eating too many typically “inflammatory” foods–foods that your body has a harder time digesting and as a result create systemic inflammation which, in turn, cause weight loss plateaus. For those trying to fight through a Keto Plateau, I would suggest eliminating ALL dairy (try subbing ghee for butter), artificial sweeteners (including stevia and erythritol) and all nuts for 5 days. I know it sounds close to impossible but all three of these Keto staples are some of the biggest culprits of inflammation in the body. I found this suggestion on another Keto website and tried it and dropped 6 lbs in 5 days. Another typically inflammatory food is Eggs. If you can’t eliminate all of these foods at once, try eliminating one at a time for a minimum of 5 days and see if there is any movement on the scale. For those who have stalled, chances are at least one of your Keto staples is holding you up. Good luck!
I actually went on a ketogenic diet last year to see if it would help my migraines. I have a history of chronic migraines which would usually last 3 days, sometimes longer. Triptans help a lot but I don’t like having to take them. I stayed in ketosis for about 8 months and experienced a significant reduction in migraines, from feeling some type of headache (mild o r severe) almost everyday to 1 or 2x per month while in ketosis. Although I’m very healthy otherwise, I do think my migraines may have something to do with blood sugar fluctuations (despite previously eating a whole foods diet and no refined carbs), and keto totally stabilized this. I eventually came off of Keto because I’m not really a meat lover. When I came off, but remained low carb, my migraines stayed under control for the most part. When I increase carbs, they do return.
Kelp noodles: Made from seaweed, kelp noodles are low in carbs, calories, and fat. They’re also a great source of calcium. Kelp noodles have a basic bland taste and texture, which makes them great for soaking up and showing off complex flavors. While they’re often featured in Asian dishes, they work well as pasta replacements in other cuisines, too.
Hi Louise, I haven’t tried that product so can’t say for sure if it’s a good choice, but it sounds like it is if the recipe worked for you – which is great! Feel free to add herbs, spices, or garlic powder if you want some flavor to the bread. I kept it plain to be used for many different applications. The number of slices will depend on how thick you cut them and the size of your pan.
Love your blog and recipes, thank you! Congratulations on doing keto – I’ve been sugar, dairy, grain and pretty much all carb free for over a year keeping my carbs to under 30 grams per day. My question is about coffee…did you give it up? I was drinking way too much coffee with heavy cream so I finally gave that up for Califia almond/coconut creamer sugar free of course! Did you give up coffee during the keto trial?
The macronutrients of zoodles are about 5 net grams of carbohydrates, zero fat and around 3 grams of protein per cup. The health benefits of zoodles make them perfect for anyone diagnosed with diabetes, trying to lower their blood sugar or otherwise following a ketogenic diet. They are packed with a number of vitamins and minerals — vitamins A, C, B and potassium to name a few[*].

Yum! My fiance wanted me to make him some cereal as he starts on his keto journey. This one looked relatively simple so I gave it a try tonight. Subbed macadamia nuts for the hazelnuts and added a small handful of hemp seeds just for fun. It is so good! Will definitely be putting this on my list of things to make regularly! I bet it will be awesome sprinkled on my homemade Greek yogurt!


Most people are used to how white flour works, but when they try to bake or cook with low-carb flour, they most likely will notice some differences. Depending on the source of the flour — and how many carbs, fat and protein calories it has — the flour may well react differently. For example, flour with high protein may clump easier; the flour also may brown or burn quicker than regular flour. This means cooks and bakers may have to experiment with the flour to learn how it works.
This was amazing!!! So I had to try a chocolate/peanut flour (Reese puff) variation for my husband and, Nailed it! I followed yor recipe but subbed the almond flour with peanut flour and also added a couple of tbsp natural peanut butter and 1tbsp unsweetened cocoa. Then baked it for 20 minutes. Once out of the oven I then sprinkled it with a combo of 3tbsp of Swerve and 1tbsp of unsweetened cocoa powder. Oh my!!! Thank you for making breakfast fun again! You’re awesome 🙂
Health's contributing nutrition editor Cynthia Sass, RD, MPH, suggests looking for cereals that are made with nuts, seeds, coconut, a little bit of fruit, natural sweetener (think honey or agave syrup) instead of added sugar, and spices for flavor. Although many of these cereals may be gluten- or grain-free, you can also look for flaked whole grain varieties.
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