As a newbie to Keto, and after perusing many Keto websites, I find yours to be the most satisfying in many ways. Your recipes are down to earth desirable substitutes for the things we hate most to switch from in a regular diet. And I was thrilled to see your breakdown of the carb friendly items in these easy to use tables. It is very difficult at first to dial in the macro percentages needed daily, because one might focus on a low carb item, to add for the day, only to find out that the protein blows your schedule. So tables are a very concise and effective snapshot of what one might add in any meal segment. I would love to see similar tables reflecting the protein in different food groups and also one reflecting sugars. With those three printed out and in front of me, it would be a lot easier to navigate the landscape. Thanks for the time and effort you put into this.
Disclaimer: Nothing contained on this Site is intended to provide health care advice. Should you have any health care-related questions, please call or see your physician or other health care provider. Consult your physician or health care provider before beginning the Atkins Diet as you would any other weight loss or weight maintenance program. The weight loss phases of the Atkins Diet should not be used by persons on dialysis. Individual results may vary.

A recent systemic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the long-term effects (greater than 1 year) of dietary interventions on weight loss showed no sound evidence for recommending low-fat diets. In fact, low-carbohydrate diets led to significantly greater weight loss compared to low-fat interventions. It was observed that a carbohydrate-restricted diet is better than a low-fat diet for retaining an individual’s BMR. In other words, the quality of calories consumed may affect the number of calories burned. BMR dropped by more than 400 kcal/day on a low-fat diet when compared to a very low-carb diet.

Ketogenic and low-carb diets aren’t as new as most people think. The ketogenic diet was developed in the early 1900’s to help control pediatric seizure cases who were not responding to medical treatment. Low-carb diets gained a lot of attention due to the Atkins nutrition plan which emerged in the 1970’s and remains a fairly popular program today. When it comes to keto vs low-carb, they are actually pretty different and can have drastically different effects on the human body.
A well-formulated ketogenic diet, besides limiting carbohydrates, also limits protein intake moderately to less than 1g/lb body weight, unless individuals are performing heavy exercise involving weight training when the protein intake can be increased to 1.5g/lb body weight. This is to prevent the endogenous production of glucose in the body via gluconeogenesis. However, it does not restrict fat or overall daily calories. People on a ketogenic diet initially experience rapid weight loss up to 10 lbs in 2 weeks or less. This diet has a diuretic effect, and some early weight loss is due to water weight loss followed by a fat loss. Interestingly with this diet plan, lean body muscle is largely spared. As a nutritional ketosis state sustains, hunger pangs subside, and an overall reduction in caloric intake helps to further weight loss.
The ingredients above are usually quite expensive and might take some experimenting to get the hang of using. The low-carb or keto way of eating by no means require baking. If you don’t miss bread you certainly don’t need to replace it with a low-carb version but if you do miss bread or maybe just miss the baking itself the recipes below might be of interest to you.
1 cup of almond milk (or milk of choice); 1/3 cup quinoa flakes (purchased at http://www.nuts.com); sweetener of choice; pinch of salt; toppings of choice (usually nuts or berries or banana). Heat the milk in medium saucepan. When it comes to a slight boil, drop in the flakes and salt. Remove from heat, stir and let the cereal cook for about 3 mins. Give it a final stir after 3 mins. It will be thicker and creamier and ready to serve.
Sunflower seed meal and pumpkin seed meal are ideal options for those who are allergic to any of the nut flours we mentioned above. These seed flours are high in vitamins and minerals such as vitamin E, copper, thiamine, selenium, and phosphorus, and relatively low in net carbs (less than five net carbs in every 1-ounce serving), making them a healthy keto-friendly option.
Toasted coconut flakes make the perfect alternative to corn flakes in cereals like this one, letting you still enjoy the crunch but without the added issues that traditional cereals can cause. Just be careful to watch the flakes as they toast so they don’t burn. Serve this cereal with your favorite milk and a few berries and you have a tasty and filling breakfast cereal to keep you going all morning.
While the ketogenic diet may sound “new,” it actually parallels the way many of our ancestors ate, before the advent of agriculture allowed for the domestication of staple crops like wheat and corn. Before the widespread emergence of these crops into the modern diet, which are high in carbohydrates and sugar (particularly in their most processed forms), our ancestors ate a wide variety of wild plants and animals and much less carbohydrate or sugar. This diet, naturally lower in carbohydrate, forced our ancestors’ bodies to burn fat for fuel as opposed to carbohydrates — the core goal of the ketogenic diet.
Hi Andrea, There is no added sugar in the recipe. The sweetener is natural, not fake, but it is not sugar and does not contribute any sugar. The 1g on the label comes from almond flour, which has no added sugar but almonds themselves have a tiny amount of sugars. For this recipe, make sure the chocolate you get is 100% cacao without any sugar added. Hope this helps. 

2. Raygan, F., Bahmani, F., Kouchaki, E., Aghadavod, E., Sharifi, S., Akbari, E., . . . Asemi, Z. (2016). Comparative effects of carbohydrate versus fat restriction on metabolic profiles, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight patients with Type 2 diabetic and coronary heart disease: A randomized clinical trial. PMID: 28607566 
The ketogenic diet, or keto, relies on using your fat as fuel, instead of glucose from carbohydrates or protein. Simply put, the daily ketogenic diet consists of 75 percent fat, 20 percent of protein, and a teeny allotment of carbohydrates, about 5 percent. This balance of macronutrients is intended to put your body in a state of ketosis, which suppresses the release of insulin and blood glucose levels. The benefits of ketosis to your health are improvements in biomarkers like blood glucose, reduction of blood pressure and decreased appetite due to fullness linked to consumption of fats.

A common question is whether you can substitute almond flour for coconut flour and the other way around. Yes, often you can but not in equal amounts. 1 cup of almond flour can be substituted for 1/3 cup of coconut flour. 1/3 cup of coconut flour can be substituted for 2/3 cup almond flour + 1.5 tablespoons of ground psyllium husk powder. The amounts may need to be adjusted depending on what brands you’re using.
If you are trying to get the kids to eat healthier and not rely on sugary cereals you might find this keto one will win them over. It has a great texture from the nuts and seeds and has a sweet warming flavor from the cinnamon and sweetener. This cereal is great with your choice of milk or can be made a bit more filling by adding in some fresh berries.
Here are a few of the most common side effects that I come across when people first start keto. Frequently the issues relate to dehydration or lack of micronutrients (vitamins) in the body. Make sure that you’re drinking enough water (close to a gallon a day) and eating foods with good sources of micronutrients. To read more on micronutrients, click here >
A study with an intent-to-treat prospective design was published in 1998 by a team from the Johns Hopkins Hospital[20] and followed-up by a report published in 2001.[21] As with most studies of the ketogenic diet, no control group (patients who did not receive the treatment) was used. The study enrolled 150 children. After three months, 83% of them were still on the diet, 26% had experienced a good reduction in seizures, 31% had had an excellent reduction, and 3% were seizure-free.[Note 7] At 12 months, 55% were still on the diet, 23% had a good response, 20% had an excellent response, and 7% were seizure-free. Those who had discontinued the diet by this stage did so because it was ineffective, too restrictive, or due to illness, and most of those who remained were benefiting from it. The percentage of those still on the diet at two, three, and four years was 39%, 20%, and 12%, respectively. During this period, the most common reason for discontinuing the diet was because the children had become seizure-free or significantly better. At four years, 16% of the original 150 children had a good reduction in seizure frequency, 14% had an excellent reduction, and 13% were seizure-free, though these figures include many who were no longer on the diet. Those remaining on the diet after this duration were typically not seizure-free, but had had an excellent response.[21][22]
Donuts were never a food we had around the house growing up. Even though my parents were far from low carb, they did eat real food and didn’t buy much that was processed. I’m not going to lie, though. I would have happily eaten donuts elsewhere whenever given the chance. It’s too bad that a keto low carb donuts recipe like this one wasn’t an option back then!
Just made these, without a silpat (I used parchment) and with a wonky cookie sheet (I desperately need a new one, and will have one before I make these again) but they were great! I really wanted chicken noodle soup, as I woke up this morning with a sore throat.. These are awesome!! Very little taste, not eggy at all, and my chicken soup really hit the spot! Thanks!
One downside to a ketogenic diet for weight loss is the difficulty maintaining it. “Studies show that weight loss results from being on a low-carb diet for more than 12 months tend to be the same as being on a normal, healthy diet,” says Mattinson. While you may be eating more satiating fats (like peanut butter, regular butter, or avocado), you’re also way more limited in what’s allowed on the diet, which can make everyday situations, like eating dinner with family or going out with friends, far more difficult. Because people often find it tough to sustain, it’s easy to rely on it as a short-term diet rather than a long-term lifestyle.
Goday A, Bellido D, Sajoux I, Crujeiras AB, Burguera B, García-Luna PP, Oleaga A, Moreno B, Casanueva FF. Short-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of a very low-calorie-ketogenic diet interventional weight loss program versus hypocaloric diet in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Nutr Diabetes. 2016 Sep 19;6(9):e230. [PMC free article: PMC5048014] [PubMed: 27643725]

Maintaining a state of ketosis is as simple as following the same dietary parameters that got the body into that state in the first place. If you limit carbohydrates and sugars in your diet, your body will opt to burn the healthy fats you consume for energy. However, when cutting carbs from your diet it is very important to focus on limiting net carbs, which is simply the number of grams of total carbohydrates in a portion of food minus the grams of fiber. Constipation is a very common issue for new adherents to the ketogenic diet, and it is caused by foregoing fiber in an attempt to limit total carbohydrates. So to prevent constipation from derailing your ketogenic diet, simply make sure you consume adequate levels of fiber!
Children who discontinue the diet after achieving seizure freedom have about a 20% risk of seizures returning. The length of time until recurrence is highly variable, but averages two years. This risk of recurrence compares with 10% for resective surgery (where part of the brain is removed) and 30–50% for anticonvulsant therapy. Of those who have a recurrence, just over half can regain freedom from seizures either with anticonvulsants or by returning to the ketogenic diet. Recurrence is more likely if, despite seizure freedom, an electroencephalogram shows epileptiform spikes, which indicate epileptic activity in the brain but are below the level that will cause a seizure. Recurrence is also likely if an MRI scan shows focal abnormalities (for example, as in children with tuberous sclerosis). Such children may remain on the diet longer than average, and children with tuberous sclerosis who achieve seizure freedom could remain on the ketogenic diet indefinitely.[46]
If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin.
While low-carb simply describes a vague behavior pattern that is subject to each person, ketosis is an objective and measurable fat-burning state of the human body. It is when the body’s metabolism switches gears to burn fat for energy instead of sugar. It is this metabolic state in which people experience the full benefits of a ketogenic lifestyle.
Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders after stroke,[7] and affects around 50 million people worldwide.[8] It is diagnosed in a person having recurrent, unprovoked seizures. These occur when cortical neurons fire excessively, hypersynchronously, or both, leading to temporary disruption of normal brain function. This might affect, for example, the muscles, the senses, consciousness, or a combination. A seizure can be focal (confined to one part of the brain) or generalised (spread widely throughout the brain and leading to a loss of consciousness). Epilepsy can occur for a variety of reasons; some forms have been classified into epileptic syndromes, most of which begin in childhood. Epilepsy is considered refractory (not yielding to treatment) when two or three anticonvulsant drugs have failed to control it. About 60% of patients achieve control of their epilepsy with the first drug they use, whereas around 30% do not achieve control with drugs. When drugs fail, other options include epilepsy surgery, vagus nerve stimulation, and the ketogenic diet.[7]
We know from our research in blue zones longevity hotspots that the longest-lived people in the world eat a whole food, plant-slant diet that is highlighted with whole grains, beans, nuts, and leafy greens. Their diet is 90-95 percent plant-based and oftentimes about 50-65 percent of their daily caloric intake comes from carbohydrates. These are not highly processed carbohydrates like white bread or sugary drinks, but whole foods like sweet potatoes, beans, whole grains, and fruits and vegetables.
I’m trying your recipe for the first time. It is very similar to a bun recipe that I make with psyllium husks so I am incorporating the method from that into this recipe. I made a few slight changes… I added garlic powder ground Rosemary and oregano, one quarter cup ground flaxseed, one tablespoon apple cider vinegar. I only used 3 eggs, and increased the Water by 2 tablespoons. By adding apple cider vinegar and the baking soda, they create a very light effervescent foam as they interactwhen I add the warm water, which acts naturally to the raise the bread, thereby allowing me to decrease the eggs. I added the extra water due to the extra dry ingredients. I’m very confident that this will work out very well. It always works with my buns so I’m eager to test this out. Thank you again for the base recipe.
I actually clicked on the story just to see if they included anything about it’s use in managing chronic migraine. I have chronic migraine, basically intractable. Nothing has helped. I’ve tried medications, meditations, and everything in between including a bunch of dietary changes. Keto is my next consideration. I’m happy to hear it helped you! Thanks for sharing

One of the central questions new adherents to the ketogenic diet must answer is whether or not they want to incorporate meat into their new diet. It is entirely possible to consume adequate levels of healthy fats whether you approach the diet as an omnivore or a vegetarian, so this decision is largely a personal one. However, if you choose to incorporate meat into your version of the ketogenic diet, it is crucial to ensure it is grass-fed, organic, and free of antibiotics. Furthermore, it is important to focus primarily on above-ground leafy vegetables, with meat serving as a side dish. An example of the perfect plate for a keto omnivore would be a sizeable portion of colorful, above-ground leafy vegetables covered with a healthy fat like olive oil, paired with a 3-5 oz serving of high-quality meat.

Please note that I am not a medical or nutritional professional. I am simply recounting and sharing my own experiences on this blog. Nothing I express here should be taken as medical advice and you should consult with your doctor before starting any diet or exercise program. I provide nutritional information for my recipes simply as a courtesy to my readers. It is calculated using MacGourmet software and I remove erythritol from the final carb count and net carb count, as it does not affect my own blood glucose levels. I do my best to be as accurate as possible but you should independently calculate nutritional information on your own before relying on them. I expressly disclaim any and all liability of any kind with respect to any act or omission wholly or in part in reliance on anything contained in this website.


Hi Andrea, There is no added sugar in the recipe. The sweetener is natural, not fake, but it is not sugar and does not contribute any sugar. The 1g on the label comes from almond flour, which has no added sugar but almonds themselves have a tiny amount of sugars. For this recipe, make sure the chocolate you get is 100% cacao without any sugar added. Hope this helps. 

I was on the ketogenic diet for 6 months to support my husband, who is on it permanently for epilepsy. The diet totally messed with my hormones, which my doctor and my husband’s nutritionist sadly confirmed was a possibility. I am continuing to eat low-carb, but the ketogenic thing unfortunately seemed to work against me as a 49-year old pre-menopausal woman.

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