I made this today and the flavor is outstanding! My only thing about it I’m not completely thrilled with is the lack of clumps of nuts and seeds. I put some pecan pieces in hoping they would form some clumps with the nuts, but it didn’t really help. I’m wondering if a thicker liquid would make a difference. Perhaps Sukrin gold syrup instead of coconut oil and sweetener? Could maybe add some maple flavoring to it. You might not be able to find Sukrin in the UK, but it is accessible through Amazon. Would maybe some of your followers from the US have an opinion about this?
If you’re willing to use sugar alcohols, those solve the problem of missing bulk. I use a mix of 4oz xylitol, 3oz erythritol, & 1/2 tsp concentrated stevia powder (NOW brand) and it replaces 1:1 for sugar. Then for brown sugar, you take that and mix it with molasses or black strap molasses (I think 1TBSP per cup) plus maple or rum or butter extract to taste. Just mix with a fork until it’s well mixed and it will come pretty close. Hope that helps.
Check the nutrition labels on all your products to see if they’re high in carbs. There are hidden carbs in the unlikeliest of places (like ketchup and canned soups). Try to avoid buying products with dozens of incomprehensible ingredients. Less is usually healthier.Always check the serving sizes against the carb counts. Manufacturers can sometimes recommend inconceivably small serving sizes to seemingly reduce calorie and carb numbers.
I made these yesterday using straight from the fridge eggs and cream cheese, parchment paper sprayed with cooking spray (I folded up the sides of the paper to prevent leakage), and a mini-chopper. Even with these imperfect tools my noodles were perfect. I was able to just tilt the pan until the batter was covering the entire area, which made them fairly thin and a few on one side were over-done but still were fine in my faux chicken faux noodle soup. They cut easily and slid right off the paper. My kids had nothing bad to say either! I will make them thicker next time for eating in a sauce as they are fairly soft but did hold up in the soup and even by lunch today were still great. Thank you!
2. Raygan, F., Bahmani, F., Kouchaki, E., Aghadavod, E., Sharifi, S., Akbari, E., . . . Asemi, Z. (2016). Comparative effects of carbohydrate versus fat restriction on metabolic profiles, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight patients with Type 2 diabetic and coronary heart disease: A randomized clinical trial. PMID: 28607566 
Emmy-award nominated screenwriter Brynne Chandler is a single mother of three who divides her time between professional research and varied cooking, fitness and home & gardening enterprises. A running enthusiast who regularly participates in San Francisco's Bay to Breakers run, Chandler works as an independent caterer, preparing healthy, nutritious meals for Phoenix area residents. Her work has appeared in The Houston Chronicle and San Francisco Chronicle, among other places. She is hard at work on her first cookbook which combines simple, fresh recipes with science-based herbal medicine.
Because I don’t think it does work as well. If you use it that way and you like it great but I can’t recommend it because I didn’t like the texture the times that I tried it in this recipe. Each recipe is tested several times… usually by several people… and this one everyone who tried it liked the original better than the xanthan gum. SO… now you know why I keep saying there’s no substitute. 🙂
This granola is delicious, after making it several times I decided to add some shredded coconut, sesame and 100% maple syrup and it turned out a winner. Now I use different types of nuts depending what I have at home. Some times I slice it into bars and take with me to work and my daughter loves to take them to school. By the way, I made the granola with all raw nuts and it only took about 15 min baking time at 180•C.
Brown rice flour should be stone ground in order to preserve the natural whole grain of the rice. It’s got carbohydrates, though. You knew rice would have carbohydrates, and even with brown rice in flour form, it carb city. Total carbohydrates in this flour are up to about 60.5, with net carbohydrates a little lower at 57. The GI index isn’t bad at the lower midlevel at 62. It’s going to raise some blood sugars, though.
Gluconeogenesis is the endogenous production of glucose in the body, especially in the liver primarily from lactic acid, glycerol, and the amino acids alanine and glutamine. When glucose availability drops further, the endogenous production of glucose is not able to keep up with the needs of the body and ketogenesis begins in order to provide an alternate source of energy in the form of ketone bodies. Ketone bodies replace glucose as a primary source of energy. During ketogenesis due to low blood glucose feedback, stimulus for insulin secretion is also low, which sharply reduces the stimulus for fat and glucose storage. Other hormonal changes may contribute to the increased breakdown of fats that result in fatty acids. Fatty acids are metabolized to acetoacetate which is later converted to beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone. These are the basic ketone bodies that accumulate in the body as a ketogenic diet is sustained. This metabolic state is referred to as "nutritional ketosis." As long as the body is deprived of carbohydrates, metabolism remains in the ketotic state. The nutritional ketosis state is considered quite safe, as ketone bodies are produced in small concentrations without any alterations in blood pH. It greatly differs from ketoacidosis, a life-threatening condition where ketone bodies are produced in extremely larger concentrations, altering blood ph to acidotic a state.
Weight loss is a common target for disease management, as well as health promotion. The prevalence of obesity remains high among U.S. adults (36.5%) (5), as well as children and adolescents (17%) (6). Importantly, obesity is a significant contributor to increased morbidity and mortality, as well as being a primary driver of increasing medical expenses (4). Despite much effort and cost, there has been little success on this front and obesity remains a public health crisis.

As you will see, simple keto meals begins with the healthy fat consideration first, making sure plenty of low-starch veggies surround the fat along with a moderate protein source. Wild-caught salmon, as a high-fat fish, is a perfect keto choice, and easy keto meals can be a fatty cut of healthy protein like salmon or lamb served with plenty of green veggies.


Looking for that hearty crunch that’s packed full of flavor? Look no more. Instead of cracking open a box of Ritz or Cheez-Its, go ahead and make your own! You can make crackers from anything including flaxseed meal (featured in The RULED Book), chia seeds, or even almond flour to make your own homemade crunchy snacks with a delicious flavor of your own.
Instead of making your own cereal, you can always have a low-carb alternative. Try out chia seed pudding, flax granola sprinkled into coconut or almond milk, salted caramel pork rind cereal, or just mix together toasted nuts that are crushed and crispy. It’s quite easy to find a crunchy alternative to cereal (or just a low-carb replacement in general) so keep on the lookout and experiment for yourself to see which you like best.

Natural fat, high-fat sauces – Most of the calories on a keto diet should come from fat. You’ll likely get much of it from natural sources like meat, fish, eggs etc. But also use fat in cooking, like butter or coconut fat, and add plenty of olive oil to salads etc. You can also eat delicious high-fat sauces including Bearnaise sauce etc., or garlic butter (recipes).
Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. I made it last night for the first time & it turned out perfect – just like your picture above! I used the big bowl of my Kitchen Aid food processor to grind the almonds & psyllium husks really finely, then I beat the eggs & coconut oil in the smaller bowl for a few minutes until it looked bubbly, then just added all the ingredients together in the big bowl & continued to process for a few minutes. I sprinkled sesame seeds on the top before putting it in the oven & after 55 minutes, it was perfectly cooked, had a good rise & our house smelt divine! The texture was also just right – soft & fluffy in the middle, golden & crunchy on the outside. I might add some other small seeds to the mix next time. Thank you so much – this is one of the nicest & easiest gf bread recipes I’ve come across!!! Keep up the great work xx
Several studies have investigated the potential of LCD or KD on weight loss. For example, Brinkworth et al. (2) compared one year of low-fat (LF) vs. LCD diet in adults with abdominal obesity. Subjects were randomly assigned and diets were isocaloric, with moderate energy restriction. Both groups realized significant weight loss, however, there was no significant difference between groups, suggesting that a LCD was equally effective as a LF diet.
These didn’t come out right but that was my fault. I didn’t have a large enough baking pan so that my silpat would lie flat which caused the batter to pool in the middle and it took a long time to cook (11 minutes) and I had to keep pulling it out of the oven, cutting off the cooked part, etc. Having said that, they were pretty good even though some of them were kind of thick. I made beef and noodles and simmered the noodles in the crockpot on low for about 20 minutes. I ordered a new pan and will try this recipe again because I think it will be good if made correctly. Also, I doubled the recipe 2 oz of cream cheese, 4 eggs, and 1/2 tsp of vital wheat gluten. Thanks so much for posting..
The only issue with keto, is really that I’m afraid that it might be hard to up my calories to a maintenance weight now that I’ve gotten a taste preference for the rich assortment of foods with no carbs in them. I’m satisfied with less calories than I will need after my excess fat is burned off… but , maybe I bet my body will send more hunger signs once there isn’t anymore body fat in the cupboard to use instead of what goes down my throat.
Taste is quite eggy; I have issues with the smell and taste of eggs (I usually hurl immediately). I was hoping this would be more noodle than egg 🙁 This being said; I simmered it in a broth (2 pkgs beef OXO, 2 tsps garlic powder, 1/2 tsp pepper; 1/8 tsp sirracha; 2 tsps oregano and about 2 a cup and half of water). Then I added some shaved beef that I had fried with orions and garlic – Like a makeshift PHO; Its tastes pretty amazing; but I can still only eat it in little bis because the noodles are still quite eggy :/ I would NOT make this recipe without a silicone mat and don’t spread the mixture all the way to the edges if the mat fits your Ian exactly or it will run under it as the mixture is VERY thin, definetly not the traditional sense of “batter”. I cooked for exactly 5 mins, it will look like it isn’t done, but trust the recepie, it is done. I used a spatula to slowly peel it off piece by piece; there was quite a bit of breakage, so don’t expect to get long noodles, but if you are careful you can definetly get a decent noodle. Overall a good recipe, just not one for someone who doesn’t particularly like eggs.
To make squares: Place dough on a piece of parchment paper, with a second piece of parchment on top. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough into a thin and even layer about 1/4-1/8” thick. Remove the top piece of parchment paper. Using a pizza cutter, cut into small squares (about 1”). Bake in the oven for 5 minutes, then take baking sheet from oven and carefully break up the squares (so they’re no longer connected). Bake for another 7 minutes. Allow to cool and enjoy!
Recently, four studies have re-examined the effect of carbohydrate restriction on type 2 diabetes. One outpatient study enrolled 54 participants with type 2 diabetes (out of 132 total participants) and found that hemoglobin A1c improved to a greater degree over one year with a low-carbohydrate diet compared with a low-fat, calorie-restricted diet [5,6]. Another study enrolled 8 men with type 2 diabetes in a 5-week crossover outpatient feeding study that tested similar diets [7]. The participants had greater improvement in glycohemoglobin while on the low-carbohydrate diet than when on a eucaloric low-fat diet. The third study was an inpatient feeding study in 10 participants with type 2 diabetes [8]. After only 14 days, hemoglobin A1c improved from 7.3% to 6.8%. In the fourth study, 16 participants with type 2 diabetes who followed a 20% carbohydrate diet had improvement of hemoglobin A1c from 8.0% to 6.6% over 24 weeks [9]. Only these latter three studies targeted glycemic control as a goal, and two of these were intensely-monitored efficacy studies in which all food was provided to participants for the duration of the study [7,8]. Three of the studies [6,8,9] mentioned that diabetic medications were adjusted but only one of them provided detailed information regarding these adjustments [9]. This information is critical for patients on medication for diabetes who initiate a low-carbohydrate diet because of the potential for adverse effects resulting from hypoglycemia.

Creaming the butter properly with the sweeter is paramount here to build a nice structure for the cookies (think rise and crunch!). And creaming with sweetener, in case you haven’t done it before, takes a bit longer to incorporate than with good-old sugar. But don’t give up, and keep going until you’ve got the sweetener well incorporated into soft and fluffy butter. 

I made these yesterday using straight from the fridge eggs and cream cheese, parchment paper sprayed with cooking spray (I folded up the sides of the paper to prevent leakage), and a mini-chopper. Even with these imperfect tools my noodles were perfect. I was able to just tilt the pan until the batter was covering the entire area, which made them fairly thin and a few on one side were over-done but still were fine in my faux chicken faux noodle soup. They cut easily and slid right off the paper. My kids had nothing bad to say either! I will make them thicker next time for eating in a sauce as they are fairly soft but did hold up in the soup and even by lunch today were still great. Thank you!
I think these are unbelievable! This is actually the first time I've written a review on Amazon, but I feel like I have to with these. I am trying to do a low carb/low cal diet to lose about 30 pounds, and have a huge weakness for pasta. I have tried Shirataki noodles, spaghetti squash, skipping the pasta altogether and just making veggies with sauce, and this is BY FAR the best way to quench my craving for pasta.

Katie, Almond flour is probably the easiest keto-friendly flour for a new cook to work with. It’s very versatile and can be used in recipes for cookies, muffins, breads, scones, cakes, etc. (Of course the ratio of almond flour to other ingredients changes based on what you’re making.) But with that being said, because almond flour doesn’t have gluten, it can be difficult to simulate the soft crumb of regular baked goods unless you combine almond flour with another keto-friendly flour and/or a binding agent. This is why a lot of our recipes call for more than one type of flour. I hope this helps! If you’re looking for a certain recipe in particular please let us know and we’ll try to point you in the right direction!


The day before admission to hospital, the proportion of carbohydrate in the diet may be decreased and the patient begins fasting after his or her evening meal.[19] On admission, only calorie- and caffeine-free fluids[37] are allowed until dinner, which consists of "eggnog"[Note 8] restricted to one-third of the typical calories for a meal. The following breakfast and lunch are similar, and on the second day, the "eggnog" dinner is increased to two-thirds of a typical meal's caloric content. By the third day, dinner contains the full calorie quota and is a standard ketogenic meal (not "eggnog"). After a ketogenic breakfast on the fourth day, the patient is discharged. Where possible, the patient's current medicines are changed to carbohydrate-free formulations.[19]
The ketogenic diet has recently become very popular, and many food companies want to cash in by putting a “ketogenic” or “low carb” label on a new product. Be very cautious of special “keto” or “low-carb” products, such as pastas, chocolate bars, energy bars, protein powders, snack foods, cakes, cookies and other “low carb” or “ketogenic” treats. Read all labels carefully for natural low carb ingredients. The fewer ingredients the better.
There are many ways in which epilepsy occurs. Examples of pathological physiology include: unusual excitatory connections within the neuronal network of the brain; abnormal neuron structure leading to altered current flow; decreased inhibitory neurotransmitter synthesis; ineffective receptors for inhibitory neurotransmitters; insufficient breakdown of excitatory neurotransmitters leading to excess; immature synapse development; and impaired function of ionic channels.[7]
Carbs in fruits and veggies do count, but you don’t add up the carbs and sugar. Sugar is already included in the carbs – it’s just listed separately on labels because some people want to see a breakdown of how much of the carbs are sugars (versus other, complex carbs). If it says 2g carbs and 2g sugar, it means there is 2g total carbs and all of them are sugar (in this case).
I’m discouraged to see that nowhere in the article nor in the comments is there a mention of a diet’s best fit to genetics. Consider if someone is an APOE E2 carrier and/or has certain polymorphisms of the APO5 gene. These are quite rare in Okinawa but much more prevalent in the USA (12% of the population). According to a number of well-designed studies, these genetic characteristics point to a higher fat, lower carbohydrate diet as beneficial and even a “moderate” carb diet as problematic.
Creaming the butter properly with the sweeter is paramount here to build a nice structure for the cookies (think rise and crunch!). And creaming with sweetener, in case you haven’t done it before, takes a bit longer to incorporate than with good-old sugar. But don’t give up, and keep going until you’ve got the sweetener well incorporated into soft and fluffy butter.
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