The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]

I don’t make pancakes often and never waffles, but I have definitely used it for the crepes A LOT. The key to the crepes is that the liquid is super thin–like cake mix, not like brownie mix. The xantham gum is really not a huge amount for the full recipe. It is under 1 TBSP per cup of other dry ingredients. Let me know if you like it better with the wheat gluten. Thanks for writing!


From an outpatient clinic, we recruited 28 overweight participants with type 2 diabetes for a 16-week single-arm pilot diet intervention trial. We provided LCKD counseling, with an initial goal of <20 g carbohydrate/day, while reducing diabetes medication dosages at diet initiation. Participants returned every other week for measurements, counseling, and further medication adjustment. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c.
I ditto that. I’m starting the keto diet, but am struggling to get my macros right. I usuaslly end up with too much protien and not enough fat. A daily “menu” to try to copy would be great! I”m 59, almost 60 and have about 20 to get off. My birthday is October and would like to have this gone by then! Thank you for all you do. I love reading your posts!!
Creaming the butter properly with the sweeter is paramount here to build a nice structure for the cookies (think rise and crunch!). And creaming with sweetener, in case you haven’t done it before, takes a bit longer to incorporate than with good-old sugar. But don’t give up, and keep going until you’ve got the sweetener well incorporated into soft and fluffy butter.
Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
So I made this recipe and the taste is amazing! However, mine is still in more of a powder form and never got any crispness to it. So we really can’t eat it. Any suggestions on what I can do to make it right? The only difference I had was I used stevia instead of 1/3 cup of a sweetener. I even tried cooking it another 10 minutes thinking my oven just needed more time to crisp it. Thank you for your help! I have loved all the recipes I’ve tried from your site.

FRUITS: Don't choose fruit juices—you're just paying someone to take the fiber out of your food. Instead, eat the fruit itself, and get 3.1 grams of fiber. You can get a serious fiber bang for your carb buck with berries (a half cup of raspberries adds 4 fiber grams, blackberries add 3.8 and blueberries or strawberries add 1.7) and kiwis (2.7 grams per fruit). Always accompany fruit with protein and/or fat such as nuts or cheese to slow any negative impact of the natural sugars on blood-sugar levels.
Thanks for this inputs. 20 years ago I gain 17 pounds a year for 5 years. I was healthy but my dr told me start diet, any diet just come back in a month I want to see you start loosing… I started Atkins and lost 7 pound in a month. She was checking my progress every six months and checking my condition. I lost 64 pounds in 3 years. Now I started eating out of control. I am eating healthy but too much… I gain 40 pound back after 20 years. Now I will start again my Atkins to take off 30 pounds…
My daughter loves cereal, but I rarely let her have it because it jacks her blood sugar like crazy, and is rarely filling enough. This is low carb enough that if she likes it, I can fill her up with other stuff, too, while letting her have the cereal she so badly wants. I was just admonished by the nutritionist at her endocrine clinic for letting her often have a nutritionally vacant breakfast (toaster waffles; we get so busy in the morning! I need to be better at pre-prep).
Because I don’t think it does work as well. If you use it that way and you like it great but I can’t recommend it because I didn’t like the texture the times that I tried it in this recipe. Each recipe is tested several times… usually by several people… and this one everyone who tried it liked the original better than the xanthan gum. SO… now you know why I keep saying there’s no substitute. 🙂
Meat – Unprocessed meats are low carb and keto-friendly, and organic and grass-fed meat might be even healthier. But remember that keto is a high-fat diet, not high protein, so you don’t need huge amounts of meat. Excess protein (more than your body needs) is converted to glucose, making it harder to get into ketosis. A normal amount of meat is enough.
Gluten Free (GF): This can definitely be gluten-free if you do not add the gluten and you are sure your oat fiber is completely gluten free. Again, just like the Family-Friendly and the THM E mix options given above, if you are not after low carb but simply after healthier and gluten-free baking options, you may omit the lower carb flours (oat fiber, golden flax, etc.) and use part oat flour or part gluten-free flour. (Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free Flour is the lowest carb gluten-free flour I have found—by many carbs in some cases!) Also, you can do the option of making it as is and using half Basic Low Carb Flour Mix and half gluten-free flour for a healthier alternative to just gluten-free flour (which is often made with corn starch, rice flour, and other “white” flours).

While low-carb simply describes a vague behavior pattern that is subject to each person, ketosis is an objective and measurable fat-burning state of the human body. It is when the body’s metabolism switches gears to burn fat for energy instead of sugar. It is this metabolic state in which people experience the full benefits of a ketogenic lifestyle.


Children who discontinue the diet after achieving seizure freedom have about a 20% risk of seizures returning. The length of time until recurrence is highly variable, but averages two years. This risk of recurrence compares with 10% for resective surgery (where part of the brain is removed) and 30–50% for anticonvulsant therapy. Of those who have a recurrence, just over half can regain freedom from seizures either with anticonvulsants or by returning to the ketogenic diet. Recurrence is more likely if, despite seizure freedom, an electroencephalogram shows epileptiform spikes, which indicate epileptic activity in the brain but are below the level that will cause a seizure. Recurrence is also likely if an MRI scan shows focal abnormalities (for example, as in children with tuberous sclerosis). Such children may remain on the diet longer than average, and children with tuberous sclerosis who achieve seizure freedom could remain on the ketogenic diet indefinitely.[46]
From the study itself: “Mortality increased when carbohydrates were exchanged for animal-derived fat or protein and mortality decreased when the substitutions were plant-based … Low carbohydrate dietary patterns favouring animal-derived protein and fat sources, from sources such as lamb, beef, pork, and chicken, were associated with higher mortality, whereas those that favoured plant-derived protein and fat intake, from sources such as vegetables, nuts, peanut butter, and whole-grain breads, were associated with lower mortality, suggesting that the source of food notably modifies the association between carbohydrate intake and mortality.”
I am so excited to have found your blog. I have been doing the low carb thing myself to lose weight and get more healthy for 4 months(and it’s working really well). But once I’ve finished losing the weight, I want to maintain a lower carb lifestyle for myself and my family. But by lower, I mean maybe 50-80 net carbs a day. I want to include yeast bread on occasion, beans, etc. But I’ve been looking for a LOWER carb yeast bread. I don’t have any restrictions which would exclude gluten, dairy, meat, nuts, etc. I normally make homemade whole wheat bread for my kids from freshly ground wheat (I grind myself). Do you have any recipes that are lower carb than regular whole wheat bread, but wouldn’t necessarily be low enough to fit a 20-30 net carb/day diet. I find that making changes a little at a time works very well with a family and myself. I’d like to take a regular whole wheat bread and tweak it to lower the carbs without greatly sacrificing taste. Also need to learn more on soaking and sprouting to get past the problem of phytates & other anti-nutrients. I am totally willing to do that. Anything you can share or suggestions of recipes to try greatly appreciated! I’ve tried searching “lower carb yeast whole wheat bread” on google or including the word gluten, then I get all the gluten free vegan recipes and so forth that are really low carb, just no luck until now!
Everyone responds to different levels of carbs, fat, and protein differently. It’s not enough to just eat what you think is a low amount of carbohydrates. Your metabolic history, daily activities, or any other factor may mean you can only tolerate 25 grams of carbs per day before getting kicked out of ketosis whereas someone else can tolerate up to 100 grams of carbs per day.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (LCKD) in overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes over 16 weeks. Specifically, we wanted to learn the diet's effects on glycemia and diabetes medication use in outpatients who prepared (or bought) their own meals. In a previous article, we reported the results observed in 7 individuals [10]; this report includes data from those 7 individuals along with data from additional participants enrolled subsequently.
But I just made some biscuits from an old cooking book, which had Almonds grounded (so I just used my almond flour) & I switched sugar for some xylitol & then thought I’d use the Coconut flour in place of ordinary Plain Flour! I did it cup for cup, so it was 2/3 cup……remembered about needing more liquid, so I added an egg (receipt already had 150g butter, which I put in 160g) They taste nice, but I think maybe I should have reduced the coconut flour, after reading your points, or added another egg, or more butter, what would you do? They also have an almond on top. thanks, Pam
It was worth the try since so many of the recipes on this site are wonderful — but I’ll make a little real pasta for an occasional cheat day, or I’ll just add lots of sauteed mushrooms to the bolognese sauce and just have a bowl of sauce. If I try this again I’ll shape the dough into small gnocchi and serve with a butter- or cream-based sauce. That might work because I won’t be thinking “pasta.”
I have been eating keto for few months and looked up so many bread recipes but yours looked the most doable and convincing. I must say this is the first time I baked bread.. ever and it turned out PERFECT!! I love you for sharing this recipe. I was a little apprehensive though because it looked rather thick so maybe a good point to indicate for new bakers like me. 🙂 Also, can I box and store in fridge (not freezer) for few days? Again thanks! I’ll be sure to try another one of your recipes soon when I am not feeling so lazy.
Made these donuts this morning, and they are delicious. The simplest and one of the best low carb donut recipes that I have tried. I did add a scoop of whey protein powder for structure, and that worked great. I used Swerve in the donuts and a small amount of Truvia (which contains a little sugar–but okay in this tiny amount per donut) for the topping. I got 8 donuts out of the recipe, but I think I actually could’ve gotten 10. I have two 6-cavity nonstick Wilton donut pans like the ones pictured in your link. Great recipe, Maya. Thanks!
Meat – Unprocessed meats are low carb and keto-friendly, and organic and grass-fed meat might be even healthier. But remember that keto is a high-fat diet, not high protein, so you don’t need huge amounts of meat. Excess protein (more than your body needs) is converted to glucose, making it harder to get into ketosis. A normal amount of meat is enough.
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Christopher D. Gardner, PhD; Alexandre Kiazand, MD; Sofiya Alhassan, PhD; Soowon Kim, PhD; Randall S. Stafford, MD, PhD; Raymond R. Balise, PhD; Helena C. Kraemer, PhD; Abby C. King, PhD, “Comparison of the Atkins, Zone, Ornish, and LEARN Diets for Change in Weight and Related Risk Factors Among Overweight Premenopausal Women,” JAMA. 2007;297(9):969-977. http://jama.jamanetwork.com/art icle.aspx?articleid=205916.
While there are many different types of pasta today, the classic cooked, unenriched traditional pasta is about 30 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams. That’s your entire daily carbohydrate intake on the ketogenic diet, if you’re lucky. After that comes a minuscule 0.9 grams of fat, about 6 grams of protein and minimal micronutrients. Even whole wheat pasta, advertised as a health food, contains 37 grams of total carbohydrates[*].
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