I remember years ago loving the Monterey Chicken at Chili’s Restaurant Grill & Bar. Then, they took it off the menu, and it has been just a distant memory ever since. Since starting Keto, I have thought about making a keto friendly version. In fact, I did post a very lazy crockpot version of the recipe that is keto friendly/low carb, which is delicious, but I missed the skillet version like Chili’s Restaurant.


Made in mini muffin pans, will have to oil them better next time so they come out easier. Taste great, although sadly more like a muffin than donut (the shape doesn’t help, lol). I may try to thicken it up to deep fry next time. Was out of cinnamon so I used pumpkin spice. Not so strict on low-carb and wanted the kiddos to like them, so offered cinnamon/sugar, powdered sugar, and toasted coconut for coating. I recommend the coconut! Browned in a dry skillet makes it nice and crunchy… just how to make it stick was the only drawback.
Now, how to actually use these nut meals and flours? It is not so simple as taking a conventional recipe and swapping almond flour in for wheat flour. Almond flour lacks gluten, a protein found in wheat that helps baked goods rise and hold their shape. It also has much higher fat and moisture contents than wheat. All of these factors need to be considered when making an almond flour recipe.
Thanks so much for sharing your results. You look so good, and you have inspired me to try a more structured version of the Keto Diet. I lost some weight recently on HCG 2.0, which puts you into ketosis (keto flu and all!). I have tried to maintain my weight loss with a version of the Keto Diet, but I know that I am probably still eating too many carbs and not enough fat. I am 47, and I contine to have issues with keeping the weight off despite a healthy diet and exercise. I am sure it is hormone-related.
During the 1920s and 1930s, when the only anticonvulsant drugs were the sedative bromides (discovered 1857) and phenobarbital (1912), the ketogenic diet was widely used and studied. This changed in 1938 when H. Houston Merritt, Jr. and Tracy Putnam discovered phenytoin (Dilantin), and the focus of research shifted to discovering new drugs. With the introduction of sodium valproate in the 1970s, drugs were available to neurologists that were effective across a broad range of epileptic syndromes and seizure types. The use of the ketogenic diet, by this time restricted to difficult cases such as Lennox–Gastaut syndrome, declined further.[10]
My 1st attempt & it was delish w/unsweetened organic coconut milk.Had no hazelnuts & only half the amount of almonds so I substituted extra pecans. Used unground flax & also added additional 2 tbs ground flax for more fiber. Added 1 tbs vanilla. Used a combo of sweeteners: Eryth, Xylitol & Stevia. Next time will grind ingredients separately to get a more chunky result.
There are numerous benefits that come with being on keto: from weight loss and increased energy levels to therapeutic medical applications. Most anyone can safely benefit from eating a low-carb, high-fat diet. Below, you’ll find a short list of the benefits you can receive from a ketogenic diet. For a more comprehensive list, you can also read our in-depth article here >
If you’re counting your carbs, it’s important to check the labels of the foods you eat. You should look for the term “total carbohydrate,” which includes starches, sugars, and fiber. This can help you balance the number of carbs you eat during each meal. Spreading your carbs evenly throughout the day helps ensure your body has a steady supply of energy to power you during the day.
The only problem with using almond flour is that it is easy to overdo it. A cup of almond flour, for example,  consists of about 90 almonds — an amount that someone would rarely eat in one sitting. Although there are many health benefits that you can get from almonds, consuming high quantities of them will flood your body with inflammatory fats and phytates, which can worsen pre-existing health issues.
The ketogenic diet achieved national media exposure in the US in October 1994, when NBC's Dateline television programme reported the case of Charlie Abrahams, son of Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams. The two-year-old suffered from epilepsy that had remained uncontrolled by mainstream and alternative therapies. Abrahams discovered a reference to the ketogenic diet in an epilepsy guide for parents and brought Charlie to John M. Freeman at Johns Hopkins Hospital, which had continued to offer the therapy. Under the diet, Charlie's epilepsy was rapidly controlled and his developmental progress resumed. This inspired Abrahams to create the Charlie Foundation to promote the diet and fund research.[10] A multicentre prospective study began in 1994, the results were presented to the American Epilepsy Society in 1996 and were published[17] in 1998. There followed an explosion of scientific interest in the diet. In 1997, Abrahams produced a TV movie, ...First Do No Harm, starring Meryl Streep, in which a young boy's intractable epilepsy is successfully treated by the ketogenic diet.[1]
Taken together, these results demonstrate a positive effect of LCD/KD on body composition. While KD may not be superior to other dietary strategies aimed at weight reduction, the evidence does suggest that it may be equally effective. Nevertheless, the International Society of Sports Nutritionists, in their Position Stand on the effects of diets on body composition, suggest the KD holds little benefit over higher CHO diets, with one notable exception; KD may enhance appetite control (1). 

The first modern study of fasting as a treatment for epilepsy was in France in 1911.[12] Twenty epilepsy patients of all ages were "detoxified" by consuming a low-calorie vegetarian diet, combined with periods of fasting and purging. Two benefited enormously, but most failed to maintain compliance with the imposed restrictions. The diet improved the patients' mental capabilities, in contrast to their medication, potassium bromide, which dulled the mind.[13]

Low-carbohydrate, or low-carb, flour is similar in function to regular flour, but the source of the flour is different. Most flour comes from wheat and grains, but low-carb flour typically comes from nuts, seeds or legumes, which accounts for the lower carbohydrate amount. As a trade off, most of these sources are higher in fat, which may be a problem for some people. Protein, fat and carbohydrate amounts are different from ordinary flour, so this flour typically will perform and act differently compared to regular white flour. A potential problem is that this type of flour is made from many common allergens, so people with certain food sensitivities may become sick from using this flour.
Non-GMO low-carb pastas are a good option if you're concerned about the potential effects on your health of consuming genetically altered ingredients. Though there are competing views in the scientific community with regard to the long-term safety of regular GMO consumption, many choose to eat only non-GMO products as an extra-cautious measure. Similarly, organic low-carb pastas that include ingredients that haven't been treated with or exposed to chemicals are easy to find.
Nutritional ketosis has been proposed as a mechanism through which hunger may be suppressed. A recent meta-analysis investigated the impact of diet on appetite and shed some light on this possible phenomenon (11). The meta-analysis included 12 studies which investigated the effect of either a very low energy diet (VLED: defined as <800 calories per day) or ketogenic low-carbohydrate diet (KLCD: defined as CHO consumption of <10% of energy or <50 g/day, but ad libitum consumption of total energy, protein and fat). Interventions ranged from 4 – 12 weeks and weight loss was from 5.0 to 12.5 kg. In all studies nutritional ketosis was confirmed in VLED and KLCD via circulating levels of β-hydroxybutyrate. Interestingly, both groups reported decreases in appetite. The results of this meta-analysis are noteworthy in two regards. The VLED groups were clearly and significantly hypocaloric, suggesting a state in which hunger should be increased, not decreased. Similarly, the KLCD groups experienced simultaneous reductions in weight and appetite, while eating an ad libitum diet. The results of this meta-analysis provide support for the theory that nutritional ketosis may exert an appetite suppressing effect.
From the study itself: “Mortality increased when carbohydrates were exchanged for animal-derived fat or protein and mortality decreased when the substitutions were plant-based … Low carbohydrate dietary patterns favouring animal-derived protein and fat sources, from sources such as lamb, beef, pork, and chicken, were associated with higher mortality, whereas those that favoured plant-derived protein and fat intake, from sources such as vegetables, nuts, peanut butter, and whole-grain breads, were associated with lower mortality, suggesting that the source of food notably modifies the association between carbohydrate intake and mortality.”

While body weight decreased significantly (-8.5 kg) in these 21 diabetic participants, the mean weight loss was less compared with what we observed in the LCKD participants of an earlier trial (-12.0 kg) [18]. Given that the diabetic participants had a higher baseline mean weight than the LCKD participants of our previous trial (131 kg vs. 97 kg), this translates into an even more dramatic disparity in percent change in body weight (-6.6% vs. -12.9%). This lesser weight loss might result from several factors. First, in the current study, most of the participants were taking insulin and/or oral hypoglycemic agents that are known to induce weight gain[20,21] Second, these same agents, particularly insulin, inhibit ketosis, which is strived for in the earliest phases of the LCKD; while it remains unclear whether ketones actually play a role in weight loss on the LCKD, previous research in non-diabetic patients has shown a positive correlation between level of ketonuria and weight loss success [22]. Lastly, compared with our previous study the participants in the current study had more comorbid illness, lower socioeconomic status, and a shorter duration of follow-up (16 weeks versus 24 weeks), all of which are associated with reduced success on any weight loss program [23].


In the mid-1990s, Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams, whose son's severe epilepsy was effectively controlled by the diet, created the Charlie Foundation to promote it. Publicity included an appearance on NBC's Dateline programme and ...First Do No Harm (1997), a made-for-television film starring Meryl Streep. The foundation sponsored a multicentre research study, the results of which—announced in 1996—marked the beginning of renewed scientific interest in the diet.[1]
If you’re someone who loves to bake, you may think that starting a low carb diet means your favorite pastime is now off-limits. You can’t have flour and you can’t have sugar, so you can’t possibly make muffins and cakes and cookies, right? Well sure, if you want to define baking in those narrow, high carb terms, then I suppose you might be right. But if you’re ready to explore a whole new world of healthy low carb ingredients, stay with me.
Also, I wanted to let you know what a fabulous addition your recipes were to our Christmas. I made the orange spritz cookies which were well received by those with diabetes, my gluten free friends, and everyone! I made them Christmas Eve. Christmas morning, I made your apple coffee cake and it was fab along with eggs, sausage and fruit. Thank you so much!
Fat: Most of the calories in a ketogenic diet come from fat, which is used for energy. The exact amount of fat a person needs to eat will depend on carbohydrate and protein intake, how many calories they use during the day, and whether they are losing weight (using their body fat for energy). Depending on these factors, somewhere in the range of 60 to 80 percent of calories will come from fats on a ketogenic diet (even up to 90 percent on, for example, the Ketogenic Diet for Epilepsy). People tend not to overeat on diets this high in fat, so calorie counting is rarely necessary.
Hi Judy. Some people can enjoy small amounts of fruit on a low carb keto diet while others can not. I always use fruit as a garnish and stick to 1 ounce at any given time. I choose the smallest fruits I can find because it tricks me into thinking that there is more. If I enjoy a little apple, I make those slices as thin as I can and it probably doesn’t even equate to an 8th of a small apple. If I shared photos of just plain porridge, with a spoon in it, it would not be appetizing to look at. As with everything in life, use common sense and make the decisions that are best for you. I offer subs and ideas in the posts and recipes. Enjoy the recipes. -Kim
My daughter loves cereal, but I rarely let her have it because it jacks her blood sugar like crazy, and is rarely filling enough. This is low carb enough that if she likes it, I can fill her up with other stuff, too, while letting her have the cereal she so badly wants. I was just admonished by the nutritionist at her endocrine clinic for letting her often have a nutritionally vacant breakfast (toaster waffles; we get so busy in the morning! I need to be better at pre-prep).
Rod, With a ketogenic lifestyle, the point is to stay within your macros, so if you’re not gluten-intolerant and the flour fits into your macros, you should be fine. Have you calculated what your macros should be? We have a post talking about which macro calculators we like best, if you’re interested: https://theketoqueens.com/macro-calculator-review/ Additionally, a doctor can help you figure out the macros that will work best for your health and fitness goals. Best of luck and welcome to the keto family!
^ Ketogenic "eggnog" is used during induction and is a drink with the required ketogenic ratio. For example, a 4:1 ratio eggnog would contain 60 g of 36% heavy whipping cream, 25 g pasteurised raw egg, saccharin and vanilla flavour. This contains 245 kcal (1,025 kJ), 4 g protein, 2 g carbohydrate and 24 g fat (24:6 = 4:1).[17] The eggnog may also be cooked to make a custard, or frozen to make ice cream.[37]
Creaming the butter properly with the sweeter is paramount here to build a nice structure for the cookies (think rise and crunch!). And creaming with sweetener, in case you haven’t done it before, takes a bit longer to incorporate than with good-old sugar. But don’t give up, and keep going until you’ve got the sweetener well incorporated into soft and fluffy butter.

We know from our research in blue zones longevity hotspots that the longest-lived people in the world eat a whole food, plant-slant diet that is highlighted with whole grains, beans, nuts, and leafy greens. Their diet is 90-95 percent plant-based and oftentimes about 50-65 percent of their daily caloric intake comes from carbohydrates. These are not highly processed carbohydrates like white bread or sugary drinks, but whole foods like sweet potatoes, beans, whole grains, and fruits and vegetables.
Russel Wilder first used the ketogenic diet to treat epilepsy in 1921. He also coined the term "ketogenic diet." For almost a decade, the ketogenic diet enjoyed a place in the medical world as a therapeutic diet for pediatric epilepsy and was widely used until its popularity ceased with the introduction of antiepileptic agents. The resurgence of the ketogenic diet as a rapid weight loss formula is a relatively new concept the has shown to be quite effective, at least in the short run.
In the first week, many people report headaches, mental fogginess, dizziness, and aggravation. Most of the time, this is the result of your electrolytes being flushed out, as ketosis has a diuretic effect. Make sure you drink plenty of water and keep your sodium intake up.6One of the fathers of keto, Dr. Phinney, shows that electrolyte levels (especially sodium) can become unbalanced with low carb intake.
I just found your site a few days ago. I’d like to try to go low carb (at least some of the time, as I want to start off slow and not change everything at once). How strong is the almond flavor? How strong is the coconut flavor? I don’t mind purchasing each and trying (but if I did that, I’d want the smallest available size available), but I’m not asking for myself, as I don’t mind (I love almonds and coconut, so neither bother me lol). There are people n my household that can’t have/don’t like almonds/the taste of almonds and they don’t like strong, strong coconut flavor. I thought I’d make a list and try to get some things delivered some time this week, so I can try out a snack or dinner (my biggest downfalls, ie lots of pasta). I’d like to keep all ingredients under $20-30, which I know may be hard, as I’ve seen some places where just the flavor can be that much. 🙁
For those wanting paleo donuts, some people are okay with erythritol since it’s a natural sweetener. If you aren’t, you can make these with coconut sugar if that’s more paleo-friendly for you. They just won’t be low carb or sugar-free, but will be paleo. If you just need gluten-free but don’t care about the sugar-free part, try gluten-free cinnamon sugar donuts.
It can sometimes be difficult to find a cereal that actually fills you up till lunch, so a keto-compliant granola can be the answer. This one is deliciously crunchy and has a warming flavor from the cinnamon and tastes great with your favorite nut milk. Nuts can be a great source of goodness and energy, so this can also be eaten as a snack when you need a little something to keep you going.
I would suggest using a keto calculator on the various websites I mentioned like Maria Body Mind Health or Ketogains. 20 net carbs, not total carbs. So I subtract the total carbs from the fiber to get my net carbs. It should be just 5% of your day, just like the chart I posted, protein can range from 15-25% for my body that is anywhere between 60-80 grams a day and the rest is fat.
WY conceived, designed, and coordinated the study; participated in data collection; performed statistical analysis; and drafted the manuscript. MF assisted with study design, performed data collection, and helped to draft the manuscript. AC analyzed the food records. MV assisted with study/intervention design and safety monitoring. EW participated in the conception and design of the study, and assisted with the statistical analysis. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.
Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution. 
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