First reported in 2003, the idea of using a form of the Atkins diet to treat epilepsy came about after parents and patients discovered that the induction phase of the Atkins diet controlled seizures. The ketogenic diet team at Johns Hopkins Hospital modified the Atkins diet by removing the aim of achieving weight loss, extending the induction phase indefinitely, and specifically encouraging fat consumption. Compared with the ketogenic diet, the modified Atkins diet (MAD) places no limit on calories or protein, and the lower overall ketogenic ratio (about 1:1) does not need to be consistently maintained by all meals of the day. The MAD does not begin with a fast or with a stay in hospital and requires less dietitian support than the ketogenic diet. Carbohydrates are initially limited to 10 g per day in children or 20 g per day in adults, and are increased to 20–30 g per day after a month or so, depending on the effect on seizure control or tolerance of the restrictions. Like the ketogenic diet, the MAD requires vitamin and mineral supplements and children are carefully and periodically monitored at outpatient clinics.[48]

I really appreciate this article. I have done low Carb for the most part for over 15 years and was able to keep my weight down. Now that I have gone through menopause is just keeps getting harder. I try doing keto but tend to fall off the wagon a lot and go back to low Carb or Weight Watchers. Simple ideas would be great. I think some keto bloggers make it seem that you have to create difficult recipes. Thanks for all you do.


I was doing LCHF (under 20 carbs most days) , Type II diabetic on a little insulin, After less than 3 mos I brought my A1C from 10.9 down to 7.1…….off to a great start. Now…..I am not only diabetic, I recently had open heart surgery (quadruple bypass),meaning “cardiac diet”. Do you know of any diabetic/cardiac people that are doing Keto? Curious about high fat for cardiac. (FYI: My Doctors are following me closely so know what I’m doing.)
The central aim of the ketogenic diet is to push the body into a state of ketosis, where metabolism shifts from burning carbohydrates as the primary energy source to fat, or “ketone bodies.” These ketones are a special type of fat that serve as cellular “superfuel.” In order to achieve ketosis, one must consume a diet high in healthy fats and dramatically lower in sugar and carbohydrates. This allows blood sugar to drop to the point that glucose is significantly less available to the body to burn as a source of fuel. In the absence of glucose, the body shifts its focus to ketones for energy production. Ketosis not only burns fat—which supports weight loss and BMI reduction if in a calorie deficit—it also transitions the body’s energy source to what clearly turns out to be a better fuel. In fact, energy derived from burning fat is associated with a remarkable reduction in the amount of damaging free radicals in the body, in comparison to burning sugar.
Hi Lee, A blender might also work, if it’s powerful enough to chop up nuts. You’ll still want to use a pulse-stop-pulse method, and may need to stir between pulses. Otherwise, you can also try chopping up the nuts and seeds before mixing with the other ingredients. If you go that route, the resulting granola texture will be a little different compared to a food processor. I used a food processor partly because it makes both prep time and cleanup a lot faster, but also because that way you get a mix of larger chopped nuts and finer powder. I hope one of the other methods works out for you!
Hi Patti, It’s up to you if you want to go by weight or by volume. I include both for convenience. Some people don’t want to weigh all their food, though weighing is definitely more accurate. The volumes listed are based on how a food is normally served, so for iceberg lettuce it would be chopped, not minced. It sounds like you’re weighing anyway, so in this case just use the weights instead (they are shown in grams in parentheses next to the volumes). Hope this helps!
AMAZING! I just made this bread and I can’t believe how perfect it is! My fiance and I are doing low carb. Not quite keto but trying to stay close to that range of carb intake! Honestly I’ve just been saying I’m avoiding bread, potatoes, and pasta. Either way this bread rocks. The only substitutions I made to the recipe was plain seltzer water in place of the still water. Wanted to give the dough some extra lift. I also put some pumpkin and sunflower seeds on top to increase the heartiness. This bread came out rocking our socks off. Can’t wait to make some grilled cheese Sammie’s with it!
The classic ketogenic diet is not a balanced diet and only contains tiny portions of fresh fruit and vegetables, fortified cereals, and calcium-rich foods. In particular, the B vitamins, calcium, and vitamin D must be artificially supplemented. This is achieved by taking two sugar-free supplements designed for the patient's age: a multivitamin with minerals and calcium with vitamin D.[18] A typical day of food for a child on a 4:1 ratio, 1,500 kcal (6,300 kJ) ketogenic diet comprises three small meals and three small snacks:[28] 

To make cocoa puff balls (takes a LOT more time, but they’re REALLY fun): pinch a little thumbnail sized amount of dough and roll between your hands to form a ball. Place on the baking sheet. Bake for 8 minutes, then take baking sheet from oven and carefully move the balls around so they cook on the other side. Place bake in the oven and cook another 5 minutes. Allow to cool and enjoy!
Hi Mona, While I can’t offer medical advice, I definitely think this bread is better for you than regular white or wheat bread. But, 5-6 pieces a day might be pretty high in calories and displace other nutrients as a result. I usually recommend focusing on a diet of whole foods, especially vegetables, eggs, meat, and healthy fats, with smaller amounts coming from nuts, nut flours, dairy and fruit. Of course each person’s needs are different and your doctor would know better than me what is best for you.

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Eat this for breakfast or for added energy before a work out.  Made in America in small batches, the fermentation process opens up the nutrients to be readily absorbed and introduces gut prebiotics to keep your gastrointestinal system running smoothly. Try this fermented option for thirty days. The makers state that you will experience improved digestion and increased energy levels.

I bought a package and boiled the whole thing. I split it up to make two different meals with. The first one was simple jarred sauce and parmesan and the second was the noodles, sauteed zucchini and tomato, ricotta cheese, and parmesan. Both were DELICIOUS. With the tomato sauce dish, I really couldn't even tell the noodles were any different. Maybe they're slightly more fragile, but it's no worse than whole wheat ... full review
Made them tonight. I thought I messed them up since they looked eggy but really they turned out great. I can’t do gluten so I tried the xanthum and I also added some garlic powder to the mix for taste.i think I cooked for 7 minutes total.we actually sliced them into little squares and threw them into homemade chicken noodle soup. It tasted close to dumpling style noodles. Not slick/chewy but very good. My 14 year old T1 loved them and wants me to make more. Overall it absolutely loved these. Will be making again in the very near future. Thanks for such a great and simple recipe! 

Hits the spot! I love traditional cereal and this definitely satisfied my tastebuds!! I will say I did realize how important it is to not over pulse, and to create a thin layer when placing in the oven. For the first few minutes I had a thick, maybe 3/4 inch layer, and I ended up thinning it out after reading reviews. I think in total I baked mine for 25-28 minutes. It was a little soft after coming out of the oven, but like you said it hardens after it cools. I added cinnamon, and wish I added more (I love a strong cinnamon flavor).

Hi Kathy, Almond flour doesn’t rise very much, but if they didn’t at all, it might be that you need newer baking powder. Falling apart is also likely due to the baking time I had in the original recipe, and I’ve updated it for a better result. Check the post for new tips! Cookies sound like an interesting idea, too, though I think the batter might be too liquid to form them.


So imagine my delight, as an adult, every time I get to pour a bowl of keto friendly cereal comprised completely of paleo granola clusters that I feel good about! I’m willing to bet that your inner child is going to be just as excited about this homemade sugar-free granola when you try it, too. Paleo cereal can now be a part of your morning routine and I highly recommend a sprinkle of it on keto oatmeal too!
Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.
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