Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders after stroke,[7] and affects around 50 million people worldwide.[8] It is diagnosed in a person having recurrent, unprovoked seizures. These occur when cortical neurons fire excessively, hypersynchronously, or both, leading to temporary disruption of normal brain function. This might affect, for example, the muscles, the senses, consciousness, or a combination. A seizure can be focal (confined to one part of the brain) or generalised (spread widely throughout the brain and leading to a loss of consciousness). Epilepsy can occur for a variety of reasons; some forms have been classified into epileptic syndromes, most of which begin in childhood. Epilepsy is considered refractory (not yielding to treatment) when two or three anticonvulsant drugs have failed to control it. About 60% of patients achieve control of their epilepsy with the first drug they use, whereas around 30% do not achieve control with drugs. When drugs fail, other options include epilepsy surgery, vagus nerve stimulation, and the ketogenic diet.[7]
Supporting these results, Naude et al. (15) found a similar outcome in obese adults with and without type 2 diabetes. This meta-analysis of 19 randomized, controlled trials compared dietary interventions using standard CHO recommendation (i.e., 45 – 65%), low-carbohydrate/high protein (LCHP) and low-carbohydrate/high fat (this group, although not specifically stated, met the criteria for KD). Results demonstrated significant weight loss among all groups in the short-term (3 – 6 months) and long-term (1 – 2 years), with no significant difference among dietary interventions. The authors concluded that weight loss interventions using CHO restriction are equally effective as isocaloric diets of standard CHO recommendation.

Participants returned every other week for 16 weeks for further diet counseling and medication adjustment. When a participant neared half the weight loss goal or experienced cravings, he or she was advised to increase carbohydrate intake by approximately 5 g per day each week as long as weight loss continued. Participants could choose 5 g carbohydrate portions from one of the following foods each week: salad vegetables, low-carbohydrate vegetables, hard or soft cheese, nuts, or low-carbohydrate snacks. Diabetes medication adjustment was based on twice daily glucometer readings and hypoglycemic episodes, while diuretic and other anti-hypertensive medication adjustments were based on orthostatic symptoms, blood pressure, and lower extremity edema.
Use this allowable low carb food list for Atkins Phase 1, (the Induction phase of Atkins) to help you start your low carb keto diet the right way. Included are fats, meats, eggs, dairy and the lowest low carb vegetables. As one loses weight, other higher carb foods are added such as nuts/seeds and lower carb fruits. These foods are systematically added back in Phase Two of Atkins. Over time, higher carb foods can be added back to the diet if eaten sparingly and if they fit within one’s daily carbohydrate intake. These foods are the foundation of low carb diets.

Here is another grain free porridge that can be ready to eat in a short time, but gives you all the goodness you need first thing. This keto porridge has an almost wheat-like flavor and can be topped with whatever ingredients you like. You can even add seasonings like cinnamon to vary the flavor even more, then sit back and enjoy a warming plate of creamy goodness!


I’ve been seeing a lot of recipes on pinterest that use peanut flour (not touted as low-carb necessarily)…was wondering if it would be good for baking keto recipes. There are carbs in it but if you bake something and only eat a serving, I’m thinking it might not be too carby. Not sure how it does as a sub for other flours that others use for keto recipes.
Consequently, when you begin a ketogenic diet, it acts as a metabolic stressor on the body. In the process of relearning how to burn fat for energy, a mild metabolic stress is inflicted upon your mitochondria. This stress is just powerful enough to kill off old and dysfunctional mitochondria which stimulates the growth of new and more powerful mitochondria (5). The end result is more energy and a higher level of vitality.
Love your blog and recipes, thank you! Congratulations on doing keto – I’ve been sugar, dairy, grain and pretty much all carb free for over a year keeping my carbs to under 30 grams per day. My question is about coffee…did you give it up? I was drinking way too much coffee with heavy cream so I finally gave that up for Califia almond/coconut creamer sugar free of course! Did you give up coffee during the keto trial?
^ Freeman JM, Vining EP, Pillas DJ, Pyzik PL, Casey JC, Kelly LM. The efficacy of the ketogenic diet—1998: a prospective evaluation of intervention in 150 children. Pediatrics. 1998 Dec;102(6):1358–63. doi:10.1542/peds.102.6.1358. PMID 9832569. https://web.archive.org/web/20040629224858/http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/press/1998/DECEMBER/981207.HTM Lay summary]—JHMI Office of Communications and Public Affairs. Updated 7 December 1998. Cited 6 March 2008.

Hi Mel, Assuming that your ranch dressing doesn’t have sugar added, you don’t need to worry too much about limiting it, but within reason. This is my homemade ranch dressing recipe, which has 0.9g net carbs per 2-tbsp serving. It would be hard to find a store bought one with much less than that, even though some round anything less than 1g down to 0g, which isn’t truly accurate. Also, keep in mind that if weight loss is your goal, some people find that too much dairy can cause a stall. Finally, make sure you aren’t using all your “available” carbs on ranch dressing – have it with some low carb veggies!
There are many recipes here that use coconut flour OR almond flour. Some I even have instructions to use both (from the post above, you can see they are not easily interchangeable). Is he tolerant of almond flour? I have many recipes which use that. Some recipes that use a small quantity of almond flour/meal, you can actually use some seed flours such as sunflower or pumpkin. I managed to make Fat Head pizza once using ground sunflower seeds when I ran out of almond flour.
Just made these, without a silpat (I used parchment) and with a wonky cookie sheet (I desperately need a new one, and will have one before I make these again) but they were great! I really wanted chicken noodle soup, as I woke up this morning with a sore throat.. These are awesome!! Very little taste, not eggy at all, and my chicken soup really hit the spot! Thanks!
The improvement in glycemic control occurred while medications for diabetes were discontinued or reduced in most participants (Table ​(Table5).5). During the study, hypertension and hyperlipidemia medication doses were not increased from baseline nor were new agents added, except in 3 individuals. No serious adverse effects related to the diet occurred. One participant had a hypoglycemic episode requiring assistance from emergency services after he skipped a meal but the episode was aborted without need for transportation to the emergency room or hospitalization.
The importance of dietary CHO is so well ingrained that the concept is taken for granted. In fact, basic macronutrient guidelines are predicated upon the idea that the central nervous system (CNS) requires a minimum of ~130 grams (~520 kcal) per day to function properly (i.e., to maintain optimal cognitive function). As a result, the minimum recommended daily intake of CHO reflects this idea (7). Similarly, most contemporary texts on sports nutrition emphasize the outsized role of CHO in optimizing both athletic performance and recovery (9). Frequently referred to as the “master fuel,” recommendations range from 3 – 12 grams per kilogram of bodyweight, per day. As an example, the recommended daily intake for a 180-lb athlete would be 246 – 982 grams, with a caloric equivalent of 984 – 3,928 calories. In marked contrast, the KD would recommend a maximum of just 50 grams (~ 200 calories) per day for the same individual.
My 1st attempt & it was delish w/unsweetened organic coconut milk.Had no hazelnuts & only half the amount of almonds so I substituted extra pecans. Used unground flax & also added additional 2 tbs ground flax for more fiber. Added 1 tbs vanilla. Used a combo of sweeteners: Eryth, Xylitol & Stevia. Next time will grind ingredients separately to get a more chunky result.
I needed a break from breakfast chia pudding, and I found this lovely recipe. I’ve been craving sugary cereals since I started Keto. I made this the night before and had it the next morning. This was everything I wanted and more, and also super simple to make. Mine weren’t as crunchy as I’d hoped (were still soft and cookie-like next day), but were still amazing! Probably because I stored them in the fridge overnight. Either way, delicious and nutritious and took me back to Cinnamon Toast Crunch, so 10/10!!
There are many recipes here that use coconut flour OR almond flour. Some I even have instructions to use both (from the post above, you can see they are not easily interchangeable). Is he tolerant of almond flour? I have many recipes which use that. Some recipes that use a small quantity of almond flour/meal, you can actually use some seed flours such as sunflower or pumpkin. I managed to make Fat Head pizza once using ground sunflower seeds when I ran out of almond flour.
LOW CARB & WHOLE-GRAIN BREADS: Lower-carb breads and tortillas can be a great source of fiber; look for those with at least 4 grams of fiber per serving. Look for 100 percent whole-grain bread (the term “multigrain" doesn't ensure it is all whole grain; check the ingredient list). Spread your toast with two tablespoons of a natural peanut butter for another 1.9 grams of fiber.
This book is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, duplication, adaptation, distribution, and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, a link is provided to the Creative Commons license, and any changes made are indicated.
Weight loss is a common target for disease management, as well as health promotion. The prevalence of obesity remains high among U.S. adults (36.5%) (5), as well as children and adolescents (17%) (6). Importantly, obesity is a significant contributor to increased morbidity and mortality, as well as being a primary driver of increasing medical expenses (4). Despite much effort and cost, there has been little success on this front and obesity remains a public health crisis. 

AMAZING! I just made this bread and I can’t believe how perfect it is! My fiance and I are doing low carb. Not quite keto but trying to stay close to that range of carb intake! Honestly I’ve just been saying I’m avoiding bread, potatoes, and pasta. Either way this bread rocks. The only substitutions I made to the recipe was plain seltzer water in place of the still water. Wanted to give the dough some extra lift. I also put some pumpkin and sunflower seeds on top to increase the heartiness. This bread came out rocking our socks off. Can’t wait to make some grilled cheese Sammie’s with it!
Protein can turn into carbohydrates via a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis (making new carbs) and will do in people at varying degrees. Protein turning into carbohydrates means you’re not in ketosis. However, this is generally an overblown statement that only happens at the extreme cases when you are drinking a lot of liquid protein shakes. 
Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.
×