I read through the comments and saw the same question about the whey replacement. Since I am on the atkins diet for an unknown medical issues, I’ve been looking to make high protien, low carb foods ranging from pasta all the way to gummy bears. In the process, I came across beef certain that has 12g of protien. I will buy the whey and use both to see how each batch turns out. Gelatin may seem odd, but with 12g or protien, I don’t see why it couldn’t work.whwn I make the batches, I’ll try to come back and post how they worked out.
After initiation, the child regularly visits the hospital outpatient clinic where they are seen by the dietitian and neurologist, and various tests and examinations are performed. These are held every three months for the first year and then every six months thereafter. Infants under one year old are seen more frequently, with the initial visit held after just two to four weeks.[9] A period of minor adjustments is necessary to ensure consistent ketosis is maintained and to better adapt the meal plans to the patient. This fine-tuning is typically done over the telephone with the hospital dietitian[19] and includes changing the number of calories, altering the ketogenic ratio, or adding some MCT or coconut oils to a classic diet.[18] Urinary ketone levels are checked daily to detect whether ketosis has been achieved and to confirm that the patient is following the diet, though the level of ketones does not correlate with an anticonvulsant effect.[19] This is performed using ketone test strips containing nitroprusside, which change colour from buff-pink to maroon in the presence of acetoacetate (one of the three ketone bodies).[45]
This granola is delicious, after making it several times I decided to add some shredded coconut, sesame and 100% maple syrup and it turned out a winner. Now I use different types of nuts depending what I have at home. Some times I slice it into bars and take with me to work and my daughter loves to take them to school. By the way, I made the granola with all raw nuts and it only took about 15 min baking time at 180•C.
Just wanted to post in case others share my initial trepidation about trying the recipe. I avoid anything super high maintenance, but was intrigued by the positive reviews, so I gave it a try. Success! I did everything the recipe said not to (used a silicone pan and cheap almond flour that was definitely not ultra fine, and I have no idea how old my baking powder is), and they still turned out great! I did liberally butter the silicone pan to make sure I could get the donuts out and also added a smidge of xanthan gum to help hold them together.
The carb content of cereals can be counterintuitive, with some sweeter-tasting varieties having fewer grams than healthy-looking kinds. For instance, a 3/4-cup serving of Honey Nut or Chocolate Cheerios has 22 grams of carbs, while a 1-cup serving of whole wheat mini-biscuits or bran flakes with raisins has 40 to 45 grams, depending on the brand. Most granolas are high-carb as well, with 35-plus grams per serving. The carbs in similar cereals may vary between brands, too, so inspect the nutrition facts label on every box before you buy.
Donna the problem about using that much xantham gum in a recipe for gluten free is the problem. Usually when using xantham gum in a flour mix the general rule is 1 tsp per cup of flour or starch in the mix. so for this recipe there should only be 4 tsp of xantham gum not the 1/4 cup ( 4 Tbls) you call for. It should give you a less gelatinous texture and a much better taste. Another possibility to use instead of the xantham would be to use Psyllium husk powder. Hope this helps someone who might be finding it hard ro bake with the gluten free mix as written, try lowering the xantham gum to the levels I suggested.
WY conceived, designed, and coordinated the study; participated in data collection; performed statistical analysis; and drafted the manuscript. MF assisted with study design, performed data collection, and helped to draft the manuscript. AC analyzed the food records. MV assisted with study/intervention design and safety monitoring. EW participated in the conception and design of the study, and assisted with the statistical analysis. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
×