Made from dried and defatted coconut flesh, coconut flour has a high fiber content, with 8 grams of carbs and 5 grams of fiber in two tablespoons. To use the flour, replace up to 20 percent of the regular flour in a recipe with coconut flour and add an equal amount of liquid. For example, if a bread recipe calls for five cups of all-purpose flour, use 4 cups of the all purpose flour and one cup of coconut flour plus one cup of water. You can also use the flour alone for breading.
At 60 minutes, the bread showed as done with a toothpick. Removed it from the oven and it sank down the center. I waited 15 minutes. Cut a piece off and it was wet, like not done in the center. I baked it 15 more min and it stayed the same. Is it supposed to be wet/moist like, maybe it’s oily from the coconut oil? If it’s supposed to be completely dry but moist, not wet, then something went wrong.
I personally think it has a mild taste (I understand what you mean about almonds can sometimes have a strong taste). Why not make a small recipe first to see if you like it. With all low carb flours (like coconut flour also) if you are sensitive to their subtle taste, you can help the recipe by adding more flavour such as vanilla for a sweet recipe, or cheese and spices if it is a savoury recipe.
Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
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