As with cold cereals, your best bet for a low-carb breakfast cereal comes in the form of whole grains. Oatmeal is an excellent choice because it is high in fiber and contains a substance called beta-glucan, which slows down the digestive process. That means you will stay full throughout the morning. Bran cereals can also be eaten hot, and whole grains such as quinoa or grits can be flavored to be either savory or sweet. Quinoa goes especially well with walnuts and raisins, dates or dried figs. It is is also scrumptious when flavored with a little bit of coriander and served with a poached egg on top. Grits are also a natural partner for eggs, but they are also delicious with pecans and fresh blueberries. Drizzle a bit of honey, agave or real maple syrup on top for sweetness. This will increase the carb count a bit, but the nutritional benefits of starting your day with a hearty, hot breakfast are more than worth the few extra carbs.
I haven’t had great success converting chocolate chip cookie recipes. I think it’s because my expectations are for the cookies to taste like my daughter’s perfect, sugary-white=flour-amazing ones. And it just doesn’t happen. I do have my peanut butter cookie recipes up, and I put chocolate chips in those sometimes. Back to your question with the coconut flour. I expected to have to tweak recipes a lot more for the small amount of coconut flour in this mix, but it hasn’t been the case. Sometimes I add a little extra almond milk, but I haven’t had to increase the eggs like I thought I would have to. That said, I would start with your regular amounts and play with the dough and see. Another egg might be needed. I will be surprised if you get the original crispy/chewy texture, but please let me know if you do!!! 🙂
Coconut flour is a low carbohydrate alternative to regular flour. A quarter cup serving contains 16 grams of carbohydrates, 10 grams of fiber, 4 grams of fat and 4 grams of protein for a total of 120 calories.  While it’s a bit higher in carbs compared to other low carb substitutes for flour, it makes up for it in texture. Its light appearance and consistency make it more absorbent than any other flours.

Another option is to decrease the intake of carbohydrates slowly, over a few weeks, to minimize side effects. But the “Nike way” (Just Do It) may be the best choice for most people. Removing most sugar and starch often results in several pounds lost on the scale within a few days. This may be mostly fluids, but it can still be great for motivation.

Most recently, Wilson et al. (27) investigated the effect of a 10-week KD on strength, body composition, blood lipids and hormonal response in resistance trained males, while following a periodized resistance training program. The investigation included a 2-week dietary adaptation period, and a control group, which followed a more traditional macronutrient ratio consisting of 55% CHO, 25% fat and 20% protein (WD). The 10-week dietary intervention was followed by a 1-week CHO re-introduction for the KD group. Average caloric consumption across the 11-week intervention was similar between groups. Blood lipids remained constant and were not significantly different between groups. The KD group did, however, elicit a significant increase in blood triglycerides during week 11, with the re-introduction of CHO. Total testosterone was significantly increased in the KD group, compared to WD, however, free testosterone was not significantly different between groups. While both groups saw increases in lean body mass, the KD group realized gains significantly greater than the WD group. Similarly, the KD group experienced significantly greater decreases in fat mass during the 10-week CHO restriction period. There were no significant differences in measures of strength or power between groups. From this, the authors concluded that the KD favorably impacted body composition, with no negative impact on blood lipids or muscular strength and power.
Fat: Most of the calories in a ketogenic diet come from fat, which is used for energy. The exact amount of fat a person needs to eat will depend on carbohydrate and protein intake, how many calories they use during the day, and whether they are losing weight (using their body fat for energy). Depending on these factors, somewhere in the range of 60 to 80 percent of calories will come from fats on a ketogenic diet (even up to 90 percent on, for example, the Ketogenic Diet for Epilepsy). People tend not to overeat on diets this high in fat, so calorie counting is rarely necessary.
My 1st attempt & it was delish w/unsweetened organic coconut milk.Had no hazelnuts & only half the amount of almonds so I substituted extra pecans. Used unground flax & also added additional 2 tbs ground flax for more fiber. Added 1 tbs vanilla. Used a combo of sweeteners: Eryth, Xylitol & Stevia. Next time will grind ingredients separately to get a more chunky result.
I’ve tried a ”ton” of low carbs foods...so trust me when I tell you how good this stuff is. If your low carb or keto...Sola products are sanity in a bag with a taste authenticity comparitative to their high carb counterparts. You won’t be disappointed so go ahead and order extra. I like to put it in my yogurt, cottage cheese, protein shakes, sugar free pudding, etc. It’s the jam with almond milk by itself too. 

FRUITS: Don't choose fruit juices—you're just paying someone to take the fiber out of your food. Instead, eat the fruit itself, and get 3.1 grams of fiber. You can get a serious fiber bang for your carb buck with berries (a half cup of raspberries adds 4 fiber grams, blackberries add 3.8 and blueberries or strawberries add 1.7) and kiwis (2.7 grams per fruit). Always accompany fruit with protein and/or fat such as nuts or cheese to slow any negative impact of the natural sugars on blood-sugar levels.
I was on the ketogenic diet for 6 months to support my husband, who is on it permanently for epilepsy. The diet totally messed with my hormones, which my doctor and my husband’s nutritionist sadly confirmed was a possibility. I am continuing to eat low-carb, but the ketogenic thing unfortunately seemed to work against me as a 49-year old pre-menopausal woman. 
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