When it comes to crunchy keto cereal, you can make it with nuts, pork rinds, coconut, nut butter, nut flour, sunflower seeds, hemp seeds, chia seeds, and so on. Some recipes require eggs to help bind the the cereal together, and others don’t. You can make them into flakes or just leave them chunky like granola. You can even make low carb hot cereal for a comforting breakfast on a cold day.
Katie, Almond flour is probably the easiest keto-friendly flour for a new cook to work with. It’s very versatile and can be used in recipes for cookies, muffins, breads, scones, cakes, etc. (Of course the ratio of almond flour to other ingredients changes based on what you’re making.) But with that being said, because almond flour doesn’t have gluten, it can be difficult to simulate the soft crumb of regular baked goods unless you combine almond flour with another keto-friendly flour and/or a binding agent. This is why a lot of our recipes call for more than one type of flour. I hope this helps! If you’re looking for a certain recipe in particular please let us know and we’ll try to point you in the right direction!
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Because I don’t think it does work as well. If you use it that way and you like it great but I can’t recommend it because I didn’t like the texture the times that I tried it in this recipe. Each recipe is tested several times… usually by several people… and this one everyone who tried it liked the original better than the xanthan gum. SO… now you know why I keep saying there’s no substitute. 🙂

I actually went on a ketogenic diet last year to see if it would help my migraines. I have a history of chronic migraines which would usually last 3 days, sometimes longer. Triptans help a lot but I don’t like having to take them. I stayed in ketosis for about 8 months and experienced a significant reduction in migraines, from feeling some type of headache (mild o r severe) almost everyday to 1 or 2x per month while in ketosis. Although I’m very healthy otherwise, I do think my migraines may have something to do with blood sugar fluctuations (despite previously eating a whole foods diet and no refined carbs), and keto totally stabilized this. I eventually came off of Keto because I’m not really a meat lover. When I came off, but remained low carb, my migraines stayed under control for the most part. When I increase carbs, they do return.

Thanks so much for sharing your results. You look so good, and you have inspired me to try a more structured version of the Keto Diet. I lost some weight recently on HCG 2.0, which puts you into ketosis (keto flu and all!). I have tried to maintain my weight loss with a version of the Keto Diet, but I know that I am probably still eating too many carbs and not enough fat. I am 47, and I contine to have issues with keeping the weight off despite a healthy diet and exercise. I am sure it is hormone-related.
Maintaining a healthy weight has never been easy for me. I’ve struggled with sugar addiction and weight gain since I was a teen. You can read about my whole journey here and see Before pics as well. But since I’ve been low carb over the last 4 years I’ve been able to easily maintain my weight. Now with keto, I’m hoping to change my body even more. I may not lose “pounds” but just seeing these results shows the scale number is just one measurement and to me the body fat number is more important.
Infants and patients fed via a gastrostomy tube can also be given a ketogenic diet. Parents make up a prescribed powdered formula, such as KetoCal, into a liquid feed.[19] Gastrostomy feeding avoids any issues with palatability, and bottle-fed infants readily accept the ketogenic formula.[31] Some studies have found this liquid feed to be more efficacious and associated with lower total cholesterol than a solid ketogenic diet.[18] KetoCal is a nutritionally complete food containing milk protein and is supplemented with amino acids, fat, carbohydrate, vitamins, minerals and trace elements. It is used to administer the 4:1 ratio classic ketogenic diet in children over one year. The formula is available in both 3:1 and 4:1 ratios, either unflavoured or in an artificially sweetened vanilla flavour and is suitable for tube or oral feeding.[51] Other formula products include KetoVolve[52] and Ketonia.[53] Alternatively, a liquid ketogenic diet may be produced by combining Ross Carbohydrate Free soy formula with Microlipid and Polycose.[53]
Flaxseed meal is the star of this recipe and with good reason. Registered Nurse Tana Amen, RN says, “Compared to other plants, flaxseed (but not oil) is extremely rich in compounds called ligands, which have antioxidant and plant estrogen properties. Flaxseed-derived ligands have been shown to reduce blood sugar and may also help combat some forms of cancer.”
Made these donuts this morning, and they are delicious. The simplest and one of the best low carb donut recipes that I have tried. I did add a scoop of whey protein powder for structure, and that worked great. I used Swerve in the donuts and a small amount of Truvia (which contains a little sugar–but okay in this tiny amount per donut) for the topping. I got 8 donuts out of the recipe, but I think I actually could’ve gotten 10. I have two 6-cavity nonstick Wilton donut pans like the ones pictured in your link. Great recipe, Maya. Thanks!
Health.com is part of the Meredith Health Group. ©, Copyright 2019 Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved. The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Health.com may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. See the Terms of Servicethis link opens in a new tab and Privacy Policythis link opens in a new tab (Your California Rightsthis link opens in a new tab)for more information. Ad Choicesthis link opens in a new tab | EU Data Subject Requeststhis link opens in a new tab
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