I am so excited to have found your blog. I have been doing the low carb thing myself to lose weight and get more healthy for 4 months(and it’s working really well). But once I’ve finished losing the weight, I want to maintain a lower carb lifestyle for myself and my family. But by lower, I mean maybe 50-80 net carbs a day. I want to include yeast bread on occasion, beans, etc. But I’ve been looking for a LOWER carb yeast bread. I don’t have any restrictions which would exclude gluten, dairy, meat, nuts, etc. I normally make homemade whole wheat bread for my kids from freshly ground wheat (I grind myself). Do you have any recipes that are lower carb than regular whole wheat bread, but wouldn’t necessarily be low enough to fit a 20-30 net carb/day diet. I find that making changes a little at a time works very well with a family and myself. I’d like to take a regular whole wheat bread and tweak it to lower the carbs without greatly sacrificing taste. Also need to learn more on soaking and sprouting to get past the problem of phytates & other anti-nutrients. I am totally willing to do that. Anything you can share or suggestions of recipes to try greatly appreciated! I’ve tried searching “lower carb yeast whole wheat bread” on google or including the word gluten, then I get all the gluten free vegan recipes and so forth that are really low carb, just no luck until now!
This recipe is FABULOUS! I just made it and used a muffin pan. I got 12 smaller muffins out of the batch. I baked them until they were dark golden and pulled away from the pan. After sitting on a cooling rack they got wonderfully hardened to a nice little crunch then the inside is so moist and tender. I’m a crunchy texture person so this is perfect for me!
Made the bread but it didn’t rise and it is probably my fault. My almond flour is stored in the freezer. I probably should have let it come to room temperature first. I watched the video and the loaf shown seems to be narrower than the pan I used. The texture is good. The taste isn’t bad. I just need a “taller” bread to make my husband paninis. Anything you can tell me will be appreciated.
All cold cereals are going to have some carbs in them. The key is to avoid simple carbohydrates, such as those found in processed grains like corn flakes or any old-school cereal made with refined white flour and a ton of sugar. The health organization Diabetes UK recommends choosing a cereal based on whole wheat, oats or bran. In addition to eating whole grain cereals, you also need to avoid excess added sugar such as high fructose corn syrup. The Center for Young Women's Health suggests that you choose a cereal that contains fewer than 8 grams of sugar per serving. Dried fruit counts as added sugar, so pay attention to the ingredient list. You can always purchase unsweetened cereal and add fresh fruit as a sweetener, because the vitamins, minerals and antioxidant benefits of fresh fruit outweigh the natural sugars.
Because I don’t think it does work as well. If you use it that way and you like it great but I can’t recommend it because I didn’t like the texture the times that I tried it in this recipe. Each recipe is tested several times… usually by several people… and this one everyone who tried it liked the original better than the xanthan gum. SO… now you know why I keep saying there’s no substitute. 🙂
On the other hand, the types of foods you’ll avoid eating on the keto, low-carb food plan are likely the same ones you are, or previously were, accustomed to getting lots of your daily calories from before starting this way of eating. This includes items like fruit, processed foods or drinks high in sugar, those made with any grains or white/wheat flour, conventional dairy products, desserts, and many other high-carb foods (especially those that are sources of “empty calories”).

From pancakes to muffins, quick breads, cookies, cakes, pie crusts and sandwich bread, low-carb baked goods are all possible with a low-carb flour. You'll have to do some experimenting to see which flour is right for your specific baked products, and be prepared for both successes and failures. An all-purpose, low-carbohydrate blend takes much of the guess work out of the equation, but also removes the adventure from your quest. Be sure to follow all directions when replacing all or some regular flour with a low-carb variety.
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Hi! My donuts are in the oven right now, but they are spreading too much & not rising. Almost running off the donut pan. I only filled them 3/4 full as you show in the video. I doubled the recipe using the above calculator. I know I followed it exactly. Any idea of what I did wrong? The batter tasted yummy and so did the finished product, the donuts just weren’t as pretty as yours.

Most recently, Wilson et al. (27) investigated the effect of a 10-week KD on strength, body composition, blood lipids and hormonal response in resistance trained males, while following a periodized resistance training program. The investigation included a 2-week dietary adaptation period, and a control group, which followed a more traditional macronutrient ratio consisting of 55% CHO, 25% fat and 20% protein (WD). The 10-week dietary intervention was followed by a 1-week CHO re-introduction for the KD group. Average caloric consumption across the 11-week intervention was similar between groups. Blood lipids remained constant and were not significantly different between groups. The KD group did, however, elicit a significant increase in blood triglycerides during week 11, with the re-introduction of CHO. Total testosterone was significantly increased in the KD group, compared to WD, however, free testosterone was not significantly different between groups. While both groups saw increases in lean body mass, the KD group realized gains significantly greater than the WD group. Similarly, the KD group experienced significantly greater decreases in fat mass during the 10-week CHO restriction period. There were no significant differences in measures of strength or power between groups. From this, the authors concluded that the KD favorably impacted body composition, with no negative impact on blood lipids or muscular strength and power.
Every meal should include a heaping portion of low-carb veggies, like leafy greens, broccoli, and cauliflower, which provide the essential nutrients for optimal health. Vegetables that should be limited due to their higher carbohydrate content include all root vegetables: potatoes, carrots, and parsnips fall into this category, unfortunately. Fruits should be consumed with caution, as well, because they contain high amounts of sugar (read: carbohydrates).
Hi Cathy, are you adapting these recipes yourself or are they already developed using coconut flour? From experience, it takes a lot of attempts to get it right (but fun too, it brings out the scientist in me). Coconut flour requires a high number of eggs for volume, thickening, protein, binding, and structure. I would be worried if there was too much avocado in there as that is just adding a soft ingredient that gives no structure. The sweet potato would add volume but unless there is enough eggs and coconut flour in the recipe, again it won’t add to the solidity of the final recipe. Psyllium I add purely to get a better crumb texture. It swells and thickens and helps bind all the other ingredients together nicely. Scones – they won’t have risen because of the lack of gluten (yay), but I quite like heavy scones as a personal choice. I started baking using recipes that had already been developed using these low-carb flours, and start by adjusting the flavours only not the ratios of the bulk ingredients. You will soon get the hang of them. Start with my flourless berry sponge, I use these ratios all-the-time! Yum.
I love this Easy Low Carb Bread Recipe – Almond Flour Bread! I made it this morning for the first time and it turned out great – taste really good. I didn’t have the Psyllium husk powder so I used Golden Flaxseed Meal and I doubled the recipe for a thicker loaf. My question is – does this need to be refrigerated and if not how long does it keep if not refrigerated.
Recently, four studies have re-examined the effect of carbohydrate restriction on type 2 diabetes. One outpatient study enrolled 54 participants with type 2 diabetes (out of 132 total participants) and found that hemoglobin A1c improved to a greater degree over one year with a low-carbohydrate diet compared with a low-fat, calorie-restricted diet [5,6]. Another study enrolled 8 men with type 2 diabetes in a 5-week crossover outpatient feeding study that tested similar diets [7]. The participants had greater improvement in glycohemoglobin while on the low-carbohydrate diet than when on a eucaloric low-fat diet. The third study was an inpatient feeding study in 10 participants with type 2 diabetes [8]. After only 14 days, hemoglobin A1c improved from 7.3% to 6.8%. In the fourth study, 16 participants with type 2 diabetes who followed a 20% carbohydrate diet had improvement of hemoglobin A1c from 8.0% to 6.6% over 24 weeks [9]. Only these latter three studies targeted glycemic control as a goal, and two of these were intensely-monitored efficacy studies in which all food was provided to participants for the duration of the study [7,8]. Three of the studies [6,8,9] mentioned that diabetic medications were adjusted but only one of them provided detailed information regarding these adjustments [9]. This information is critical for patients on medication for diabetes who initiate a low-carbohydrate diet because of the potential for adverse effects resulting from hypoglycemia.

The improvement in glycemic control occurred while medications for diabetes were discontinued or reduced in most participants (Table ​(Table5).5). During the study, hypertension and hyperlipidemia medication doses were not increased from baseline nor were new agents added, except in 3 individuals. No serious adverse effects related to the diet occurred. One participant had a hypoglycemic episode requiring assistance from emergency services after he skipped a meal but the episode was aborted without need for transportation to the emergency room or hospitalization.
The ketosis produced by fasting or limiting carbohydrate intake does not have negative effects for most people once the body has adapted to that state. The ketosis caused by diet has been referred to as dietary ketosis, physiological ketosis, benign dietary ketosis (Atkins), and, most recently, nutritional ketosis (Phinney and Volek), in an attempt to clear up possible confusion with diabetic ketoacidosis.
I am thankful for you and for Maria Emmerich as well. Your biscotti recipe and a few others make my low carb life possible and enjoyable. Maria E’s bread with psyllium recipe is another that keeps me happy and healthy. Thank you both. My life is revolutionized in these past 2 years and I couldn’t have sustained low carb eating without you. Your almond tea cake recipe was my first venture into almond flour and erythritol, etc—low carb cooking and eating would just be too drab and boring for me without your recipes.

I tried to make the egg noodles and it was a total failure. Followed the directions without any substitutions.’ Not sure what happened. The texture was off. It was nearly impossible to remove from the pan and I used the latex mat and sprayed as well. It was mushy and seemed undercooked. I was disappointed because I had made the sauce and was ready to eat. It looked like the mixture was set and cooked, Perhaps my oven is off.
Fanatic? Someone with T2D, a disease usually claimed to be progressive and a never ending stream of problems and medications, was REVERSED. That’s something to shout from the rooftops. The drop in medication use alone, but the big pharma companies would prefer that people’s stories of reversing (well, putting it into remission) T2D get called fanatical instead of insightful.
Y. Wady Aude, MD; Arthur S. Agatston, MD; Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, MD, MSc; Eric H. Lieberman, MD; Marie Almon, MS, RD; Melinda Hansen, ARNP; Gerardo Rojas, MD; Gervasio A. Lamas, MD; Charles H. Hennekens, MD, DrPH, “The National Cholesterol Education Program Diet vs a Diet Lower in Carbohydrates and Higher in Protein and Monounsaturated Fat,” Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(19):2141-2146. http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=217514.
A common question is whether you can substitute almond flour for coconut flour and the other way around. Yes, often you can but not in equal amounts. 1 cup of almond flour can be substituted for 1/3 cup of coconut flour. 1/3 cup of coconut flour can be substituted for 2/3 cup almond flour + 1.5 tablespoons of ground psyllium husk powder. The amounts may need to be adjusted depending on what brands you’re using.
While CHO is almost universally regarded as necessary for both health and athletic performance, many studies have called into question the absolute necessity of dietary CHO. As early as 1930 there was evidence demonstrating the efficacy of long-term CHO restriction (14). In an audacious attempt to demonstrate proof-of-concept, arctic explorers Dr. Viljalmur Stefansson and K. Anderson, agreed to participate in a study that involved one year of eating a diet that consisted solely of “meat.” The diet, which consisted of beef, pork, lamb, and chicken, also included significant portions of animal fat, as well as organ meat. This dietary regimen yielded a macronutrient distribution of approximately 81% fat, 18% protein and 1% CHO, over the course of 375 days. The subjects experienced a modest reduction in weight, which occurred during the first week; there were no restrictions on food portions, subjects ate to satisfy appetite. Interestingly, the researchers noted no vitamin deficiencies, no significant change in mental alertness or physical impairment, or any other deficit attributed to eating a high fat, all-meat diet.

Although many hypotheses have been put forward to explain how the ketogenic diet works, it remains a mystery. Disproven hypotheses include systemic acidosis (high levels of acid in the blood), electrolyte changes and hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose).[19] Although many biochemical changes are known to occur in the brain of a patient on the ketogenic diet, it is not known which of these has an anticonvulsant effect. The lack of understanding in this area is similar to the situation with many anticonvulsant drugs.[56]
The ketogenic diet is one of the most talked about and debated diet trends today. You’ve probably heard celebrities, athletes, and neighbors raving about the benefits of this dietary approach. Interestingly, the science backs up its rapid growth in popularity, as a ketogenic diet has been shown to have numerous health benefits for its adherents. The diet can reduce the risk of heart disease, improve glycemic control in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, help individuals struggling with obesity lower their BMI, and even improve or control symptoms of debilitating neurodegenerative conditions like Parkinson’s and epilepsy. There is even some evidence to suggest that a ketogenic diet can play a role in the treatment of cancer! If it is implemented properly, adopting a ketogenic diet can be a very powerful tool in the fight against a variety of chronic diseases.
Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.
Hi Patti, It’s up to you if you want to go by weight or by volume. I include both for convenience. Some people don’t want to weigh all their food, though weighing is definitely more accurate. The volumes listed are based on how a food is normally served, so for iceberg lettuce it would be chopped, not minced. It sounds like you’re weighing anyway, so in this case just use the weights instead (they are shown in grams in parentheses next to the volumes). Hope this helps!
A computer program such as KetoCalculator may be used to help generate recipes.[47] The meals often have four components: heavy whipping cream, a protein-rich food (typically meat), a fruit or vegetable and a fat such as butter, vegetable oil, or mayonnaise. Only low-carbohydrate fruits and vegetables are allowed, which excludes bananas, potatoes, peas, and corn. Suitable fruits are divided into two groups based on the amount of carbohydrate they contain, and vegetables are similarly divided into two groups. Foods within each of these four groups may be freely substituted to allow for variation without needing to recalculate portion sizes. For example, cooked broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and green beans are all equivalent. Fresh, canned, or frozen foods are equivalent, but raw and cooked vegetables differ, and processed foods are an additional complication. Parents are required to be precise when measuring food quantities on an electronic scale accurate to 1 g. The child must eat the whole meal and cannot have extra portions; any snacks must be incorporated into the meal plan. A small amount of MCT oil may be used to help with constipation or to increase ketosis.[37]
I think that what Beverly is talking about when she says English battered fish is one where it isn’t crunch, exactly. The fish is dipped in a flour and egg based thick batter and deep-fried, leaving a lovely chewy coating on the outside. So delish! The closest thing I can think of in US terms are those batter dipped hot-dogs on a stick people used to eat. Anyway, I suspect we’d be moving more in the direction of some substitute using beaten egg whites, perhaps? Maybe modifying something more in the line of keto pancake batter?

I’m discouraged to see that nowhere in the article nor in the comments is there a mention of a diet’s best fit to genetics. Consider if someone is an APOE E2 carrier and/or has certain polymorphisms of the APO5 gene. These are quite rare in Okinawa but much more prevalent in the USA (12% of the population). According to a number of well-designed studies, these genetic characteristics point to a higher fat, lower carbohydrate diet as beneficial and even a “moderate” carb diet as problematic.
I was on the ketogenic diet for 6 months to support my husband, who is on it permanently for epilepsy. The diet totally messed with my hormones, which my doctor and my husband’s nutritionist sadly confirmed was a possibility. I am continuing to eat low-carb, but the ketogenic thing unfortunately seemed to work against me as a 49-year old pre-menopausal woman.
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