These tasty mini burgers are perfect for parties because they can feed your low carb AND carb-loving guests and no one will even miss that bread. Make them for tailgating parties, game day parties, summer picnics, or just a fun weeknight dinner for the family. Once you dip those little burger bites in that special sauce you’re going to be going back for seconds!
A classy twist on the average turkey burger, this nutritious recipe comes together quickly—the mushrooms roast in the oven for 12 minutes while the turkey cooks on the stovetop—looks complicated (read: serve when you have friends coming over), and tastes delicious. Packed with protein, thanks to turkey, plenty of potassium courtesy of the mushrooms, and crazy tasty. What more do you need?

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders after stroke,[7] and affects around 50 million people worldwide.[8] It is diagnosed in a person having recurrent, unprovoked seizures. These occur when cortical neurons fire excessively, hypersynchronously, or both, leading to temporary disruption of normal brain function. This might affect, for example, the muscles, the senses, consciousness, or a combination. A seizure can be focal (confined to one part of the brain) or generalised (spread widely throughout the brain and leading to a loss of consciousness). Epilepsy can occur for a variety of reasons; some forms have been classified into epileptic syndromes, most of which begin in childhood. Epilepsy is considered refractory (not yielding to treatment) when two or three anticonvulsant drugs have failed to control it. About 60% of patients achieve control of their epilepsy with the first drug they use, whereas around 30% do not achieve control with drugs. When drugs fail, other options include epilepsy surgery, vagus nerve stimulation, and the ketogenic diet.[7]

Hi Jan, Sorry they didn’t work for you. It’s hard to say what happened without being in the kitchen with you. Did you use exactly the same ingredients and amounts? Also, if they were not cooked, then they probably needed to be in the oven for longer. If they were clumpy, it’s also possible that the almond flour wasn’t fine blanched (it needs to be) or the batter wasn’t mixed well enough. Hope this helps.


Providing additional support Paoli et al. (17) examined the effect of a modified KD diet (~55% fat, 41% protein, and 4.5% CHO) on performance and body composition in gymnasts. In a crossover design, researchers compared independent 30-day dietary regimens consisting of “normal diet” (WD; 46.8% CHO, 38.5% fat, and 14.7% protein) and modified KD in nine elite male gymnasts. There were no significant changes from pre to post during either dietary intervention for measures of physical performance, indicating the absence of significant dietary CHO did not negatively impact physical ability. The post-KD measurements, however, saw a significant decrease in fat mass (pre: 5.3; post:

If you’re counting your carbs, it’s important to check the labels of the foods you eat. You should look for the term “total carbohydrate,” which includes starches, sugars, and fiber. This can help you balance the number of carbs you eat during each meal. Spreading your carbs evenly throughout the day helps ensure your body has a steady supply of energy to power you during the day.
I doubled the recipe. Accidentally added 3tsps baking powder. Also added 1/4 cup ground flax, 1/4 cup sesame seeds, 1/2 cup slivered almonds. I then mixed it for 3 minutes in my stand mixer. I baked the bread for 60 min and then added 10 and then another 10more. I used a thermometer and let it get to 200 degrees internal temperature.. That’s what I use for regular bread and seems accurate for your recipe. I’ll try to send a picture. It looks like bakery bread and tastes delicious. My family who are Leary of myGF and grain Free experiments love this bread!!!!

Mine didn’t turn out super firm. It was somewhat crumbly, but not the “dust” that some have complained of. I used a silicone liner on the baking sheet for easy removal. I baked it about 5 minutes longer than recommended, but it felt set to the touch, so I removed it. I used a pizza roller while it was still warm to cut it into little squares right on the baking sheet, which were firm enough to keep their shape. DELICIOUS!! More cinnamon flavor and far tastier, but less crunch, than Cinnamon Toast Crunch from my erstwhile fat days. For the coating, I used Sukrin Gold, which is an erythritol based brown sugar sub. Wow!! Tastes like I’m eating snickerdoodles dunked in (almond) milk; the texture is similar, as well. Can’t speak highly enough for this surefire winner that just hit the spot!

Every meal should include a heaping portion of low-carb veggies, like leafy greens, broccoli, and cauliflower, which provide the essential nutrients for optimal health. Vegetables that should be limited due to their higher carbohydrate content include all root vegetables: potatoes, carrots, and parsnips fall into this category, unfortunately. Fruits should be consumed with caution, as well, because they contain high amounts of sugar (read: carbohydrates).

I’ve been seeing a lot of recipes on pinterest that use peanut flour (not touted as low-carb necessarily)…was wondering if it would be good for baking keto recipes. There are carbs in it but if you bake something and only eat a serving, I’m thinking it might not be too carby. Not sure how it does as a sub for other flours that others use for keto recipes.
Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.

A study with an intent-to-treat prospective design was published in 1998 by a team from the Johns Hopkins Hospital[20] and followed-up by a report published in 2001.[21] As with most studies of the ketogenic diet, no control group (patients who did not receive the treatment) was used. The study enrolled 150 children. After three months, 83% of them were still on the diet, 26% had experienced a good reduction in seizures, 31% had had an excellent reduction, and 3% were seizure-free.[Note 7] At 12 months, 55% were still on the diet, 23% had a good response, 20% had an excellent response, and 7% were seizure-free. Those who had discontinued the diet by this stage did so because it was ineffective, too restrictive, or due to illness, and most of those who remained were benefiting from it. The percentage of those still on the diet at two, three, and four years was 39%, 20%, and 12%, respectively. During this period, the most common reason for discontinuing the diet was because the children had become seizure-free or significantly better. At four years, 16% of the original 150 children had a good reduction in seizure frequency, 14% had an excellent reduction, and 13% were seizure-free, though these figures include many who were no longer on the diet. Those remaining on the diet after this duration were typically not seizure-free, but had had an excellent response.[21][22]


Donna the problem about using that much xantham gum in a recipe for gluten free is the problem. Usually when using xantham gum in a flour mix the general rule is 1 tsp per cup of flour or starch in the mix. so for this recipe there should only be 4 tsp of xantham gum not the 1/4 cup ( 4 Tbls) you call for. It should give you a less gelatinous texture and a much better taste. Another possibility to use instead of the xantham would be to use Psyllium husk powder. Hope this helps someone who might be finding it hard ro bake with the gluten free mix as written, try lowering the xantham gum to the levels I suggested.
Melanie, curious to know what the quality of the foods you are eating? Organic? Grass fed Beef/butter? What oils are the using for fats? And do you think you are getting enough dark leafy greens, which give you the nutrient density needed to detox well? toxins stored in fat cells can cause issues with weight lose. looking into these topics and some light tweaks may help you with your goals! Best of luck!
The classic ketogenic diet is not a balanced diet and only contains tiny portions of fresh fruit and vegetables, fortified cereals, and calcium-rich foods. In particular, the B vitamins, calcium, and vitamin D must be artificially supplemented. This is achieved by taking two sugar-free supplements designed for the patient's age: a multivitamin with minerals and calcium with vitamin D.[18] A typical day of food for a child on a 4:1 ratio, 1,500 kcal (6,300 kJ) ketogenic diet comprises three small meals and three small snacks:[28]
However, replacing high carb flours like all-purpose flour, wheat flour, corn flour, and rice flour with low-carb flour is not as simple as just using one for the other. Due to the difference in composition between high-carb and low-carb flours, you will need to use different amounts of low-carb flour together with other essential ingredients that you don’t typically find in traditional baking recipes like psyllium husk, xanthan gum, and protein powder.

It’s no secret that diet, exercise and fitness are very important to me. It’s truly the whole reason for this blog. I love being creative in the kitchen and playing around with my ingredients, certainly. But more than that, I love knowing that my recipes are helping those of you on a weight-loss or health journey find your love of food again. Because food is fuel, but it’s also happiness and comfort. A healthy diet shouldn’t be about deprivation because that inevitably leads to failure. We are so much more likely to succeed when we love what we eat.

Since the ingredients are eggs and cream cheese, and the recipe for scrambled eggs or an omelette is eggs and cream or milk, which is almost the same, the taste is going to be eggy. Adding gluten,which has no taste, is not going to change the flavor. I thought it might change the texture, but it didn’t do that either. How it’s mixed, baked, or simmered isn’t going to change the flavor either.
Using almond instead of wheat-based flour keeps these breakfast beauties lower in carbs without sacrificing the tiniest bit of taste. Whip up the batter with a blender for a quicker breakfast, or use a bowl and whisk—either option yields delicious results. Add berries for some color and a fruity zing. Oh, and trust us one this one—make an extra batch to freeze for a busy morning.
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