What do mac and cheese, stacks of pancakes, and bowls of pasta all have in common? If you answered, “Umm, they’re delicious,” you’d be right. But they’re also heavy in carbs and can leave you feeling tired and annoyed. And while a diet rich in healthy carbohydrates is good for us in moderation, after a long, cold winter, you might be itching to try something fresh for spring. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. We’ve gathered some of the most notorious carb-heavy foods and found a delicious, low-carb alternative to satisfy any craving.

First reported in 2003, the idea of using a form of the Atkins diet to treat epilepsy came about after parents and patients discovered that the induction phase of the Atkins diet controlled seizures. The ketogenic diet team at Johns Hopkins Hospital modified the Atkins diet by removing the aim of achieving weight loss, extending the induction phase indefinitely, and specifically encouraging fat consumption. Compared with the ketogenic diet, the modified Atkins diet (MAD) places no limit on calories or protein, and the lower overall ketogenic ratio (about 1:1) does not need to be consistently maintained by all meals of the day. The MAD does not begin with a fast or with a stay in hospital and requires less dietitian support than the ketogenic diet. Carbohydrates are initially limited to 10 g per day in children or 20 g per day in adults, and are increased to 20–30 g per day after a month or so, depending on the effect on seizure control or tolerance of the restrictions. Like the ketogenic diet, the MAD requires vitamin and mineral supplements and children are carefully and periodically monitored at outpatient clinics.[48]
As with cold cereals, your best bet for a low-carb breakfast cereal comes in the form of whole grains. Oatmeal is an excellent choice because it is high in fiber and contains a substance called beta-glucan, which slows down the digestive process. That means you will stay full throughout the morning. Bran cereals can also be eaten hot, and whole grains such as quinoa or grits can be flavored to be either savory or sweet. Quinoa goes especially well with walnuts and raisins, dates or dried figs. It is is also scrumptious when flavored with a little bit of coriander and served with a poached egg on top. Grits are also a natural partner for eggs, but they are also delicious with pecans and fresh blueberries. Drizzle a bit of honey, agave or real maple syrup on top for sweetness. This will increase the carb count a bit, but the nutritional benefits of starting your day with a hearty, hot breakfast are more than worth the few extra carbs.
Children who discontinue the diet after achieving seizure freedom have about a 20% risk of seizures returning. The length of time until recurrence is highly variable, but averages two years. This risk of recurrence compares with 10% for resective surgery (where part of the brain is removed) and 30–50% for anticonvulsant therapy. Of those who have a recurrence, just over half can regain freedom from seizures either with anticonvulsants or by returning to the ketogenic diet. Recurrence is more likely if, despite seizure freedom, an electroencephalogram shows epileptiform spikes, which indicate epileptic activity in the brain but are below the level that will cause a seizure. Recurrence is also likely if an MRI scan shows focal abnormalities (for example, as in children with tuberous sclerosis). Such children may remain on the diet longer than average, and children with tuberous sclerosis who achieve seizure freedom could remain on the ketogenic diet indefinitely.[46]

I’ve done the micro version for slices and it was quite good. Today trying the loaf recipe – but with the micro version and this one my mix never comes out like a batter – more like a moist dough. Any ideas what I may be doing wrong please? I have to say though that you are wonderful giving me a non carb bread – my husband loves bread and needs to lose weight. Many thanks!
The ketogenic diet is an incredibly powerful tool that can be wonderfully effective in treating a variety of health issues facing modern society. By allowing the body to burn fat for fuel, the ketogenic diet can not only lead to sustainable weight loss, but it actually pushes the body to use an alternative and potentially superior fuel source. If you are just starting a ketogenic diet, use the tips outlined above and stick with it; it can be a challenging transition, but there are many, many benefits of long-term adherence to this diet.

Next, the noodles are tasteless, so they make a great vessel for your pasta sauces. These are 6g net carbs per serving, but the servings are huge! We generally aren’t big fans of the concept of eating less of something to make it seem lower in carbs. But, we have found that when cooked, even half of the recommended serving is pretty sizable for these noodles.
Toasted coconut flakes make the perfect alternative to corn flakes in cereals like this one, letting you still enjoy the crunch but without the added issues that traditional cereals can cause. Just be careful to watch the flakes as they toast so they don’t burn. Serve this cereal with your favorite milk and a few berries and you have a tasty and filling breakfast cereal to keep you going all morning.
Rod, With a ketogenic lifestyle, the point is to stay within your macros, so if you’re not gluten-intolerant and the flour fits into your macros, you should be fine. Have you calculated what your macros should be? We have a post talking about which macro calculators we like best, if you’re interested: https://theketoqueens.com/macro-calculator-review/ Additionally, a doctor can help you figure out the macros that will work best for your health and fitness goals. Best of luck and welcome to the keto family!
The trick to working with coconut flour is accepting the fact that it requires a lot of eggs to give it structure and a decent consistency. It can be a little shocking to see half a dozen to a dozen eggs in a recipe, but as you try it out, you will see that it works. The end results are rarely too eggy or rubbery. You will also be surprised to see how little coconut flour is used in most recipes. It’s incredibly dense, but expands remarkably with the added eggs and liquid, so you typically only need about a third of the amount you would need with conventional flour or nut flours.
Weight loss is a common target for disease management, as well as health promotion. The prevalence of obesity remains high among U.S. adults (36.5%) (5), as well as children and adolescents (17%) (6). Importantly, obesity is a significant contributor to increased morbidity and mortality, as well as being a primary driver of increasing medical expenses (4). Despite much effort and cost, there has been little success on this front and obesity remains a public health crisis.
Instead of getting that store-bought can of frosting that’s filled with sugar, food coloring, and trans fats, make your own! Cream cheese and butter come together perfectly to create a rich and creamy frosting that makes all of your cakes taste better. If you want an example of a great cream cheese frosting (with added fruit compote), check out our Low Carb Spice Cakes with Cream Cheese Frosting.
Oh my God, do you have any idea what you have done, LOL. I have searched for months for anything like biscuits etc. I have a good pancake recipe but that is it. I am not paleo just a 65 year old junk food junky. I’m extremely low carb and sugar and grain free. Your biscuit recipe is fantastic! I do tweak it a little, just a touch more butter and they are so good I only get 6 out of the recipe for 12, oops. Gonna try the bread recipe next. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU.
	Low Carb FoodsLow Carb MixesLow Carb BarsLow Carb BreadsLow Carb BrowniesLow Carb Cakes - PiesLow Carb CandyLow Carb CerealLow Carb ChocolateLow Carb CondimentsLow Carb CookiesLow Carb EntreesLow Carb MuffinsLow Carb PastaLow Carb PastriesLow Carb SnacksDiet FoodsHealthy MixesHealthy BarsHealthy BreadsHealthy BrowniesHealthy Cakes - PiesHealthy CandyHealthy CerealHealthy ChocolateHealthy CondimentsHealthy CookiesHealthy EntreesHealthy Frozen FoodHealthy MuffinsHealthy PastaHealthy PastriesHealthy Peanut ButterHealthy Snack FoodsSupplements     

Rami co-founded Tasteaholics with Vicky at the start of 2015 to master the art of creating extremely delicious food while researching the truth behind nutrition, dieting and overall health. You can usually find him marketing, coding or coming up with the next crazy idea because he can't sit still for too long. His top read is The 4-Hour Workweek and he loves listening to Infected Mushroom in his spare time.
I thought that eating this amount of protein would leave me a withered and emaciated little boy, but this is a belief I held for years of being beating over the head with jugs of protein powder and bro-science. It turns out, you (or, at least I) don’t need as much protein as once thought. However, eating very FEW grams of protein is not smart either. 
Mine didn’t turn out super firm. It was somewhat crumbly, but not the “dust” that some have complained of. I used a silicone liner on the baking sheet for easy removal. I baked it about 5 minutes longer than recommended, but it felt set to the touch, so I removed it. I used a pizza roller while it was still warm to cut it into little squares right on the baking sheet, which were firm enough to keep their shape. DELICIOUS!! More cinnamon flavor and far tastier, but less crunch, than Cinnamon Toast Crunch from my erstwhile fat days. For the coating, I used Sukrin Gold, which is an erythritol based brown sugar sub. Wow!! Tastes like I’m eating snickerdoodles dunked in (almond) milk; the texture is similar, as well. Can’t speak highly enough for this surefire winner that just hit the spot!
This is the best! I’m really bad at baking but I have made this twice and both times it was perfect. I’ve shared it with all my gluten intolerant friends, thank you. Oh, I reduced the psyllium husk to an eighth and replaced the other eighth with gluten free flour. It made it less gritty. Yummy! Today I’m going to add some spices and sultanas for a sweet treat. Hope it works!
Advocates for the diet recommend that it be seriously considered after two medications have failed, as the chance of other drugs succeeding is only 10%.[9][31][32] The diet can be considered earlier for some epilepsy and genetic syndromes where it has shown particular usefulness. These include Dravet syndrome, infantile spasms, myoclonic-astatic epilepsy, and tuberous sclerosis complex.[9][33]
Hwu believes risks of cardiovascular disease and diabetes — which are both associated with high blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol — may be reduced by following the ketogenic diet, based on research. A recent study from Johns Hopkins found a ketogenic diet was not only safe, but effective for adults who had certain severe forms of epilepsy, supporting previous research.
There is nothing inherently difficult about following a ketogenic diet. We have many patients who do this very easily over many years. The metabolic benefits significantly outway any perceived challenges from limiting particular food types. Uptake would be far more widespread if nutrition professionals left their predujical opinions of SFA’s behind. Finally, given the expertise in Ketogenic Diets at Harvard, Dr David Ludwig, for one springs to mind, I am surprised the author did not avail themselves of the local expertise.
Health.com is part of the Meredith Health Group. ©, Copyright 2019 Meredith Corporation. All rights reserved. The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Health.com may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. See the Terms of Servicethis link opens in a new tab and Privacy Policythis link opens in a new tab (Your California Rightsthis link opens in a new tab)for more information. Ad Choicesthis link opens in a new tab | EU Data Subject Requeststhis link opens in a new tab
×