Hi Woody, Yeast works by consuming sugar (either added sugar or sugar in wheat flour), so it would not work with these ingredients. You could try adding some yeast *and* some sugar (knowing that the yeast would consume most of it), but I haven’t experimented with that. Aside from that, mixing the batter well can help create more air bubbles, and make sure you are using fresh baking powder.
Short-term results for the LGIT indicate that at one month approximately half of the patients experience a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency, with overall figures approaching that of the ketogenic diet. The data (coming from one centre's experience with 76 children up to the year 2009) also indicate fewer side effects than the ketogenic diet and that it is better tolerated, with more palatable meals.[18][50]
With that in mind, would you recommend adding additional eggs and/or liquid to account for the absorption properties of the coconut flour? Perhaps eggs, egg whites, yogurt, or cream? The original recipe (which calls for two large eggs) has a great balance of crispy/chewy, so I will be trying to approximate that as closely as possible. I know it’s going to take some experimentation, just trying to make an educated guess on the starting point.
Update: Well I tried it again but this time I altered the recipe a bit. I combined the 2 TBSP cereal with 1 cup of Almond Coconut Milk and 1 TSP "Swerve" Powdered Sugar Substitute. I whisked the ingredients together thoroughly and then microwaved on high for 2 minutes. I whisked again after removing from the microwave and added 1TBSP butter. After letting it sit for about 1 minute, I whisked it one more time and then added blueberries and blackberries. ... full review

The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]

After initiation, the child regularly visits the hospital outpatient clinic where they are seen by the dietitian and neurologist, and various tests and examinations are performed. These are held every three months for the first year and then every six months thereafter. Infants under one year old are seen more frequently, with the initial visit held after just two to four weeks.[9] A period of minor adjustments is necessary to ensure consistent ketosis is maintained and to better adapt the meal plans to the patient. This fine-tuning is typically done over the telephone with the hospital dietitian[19] and includes changing the number of calories, altering the ketogenic ratio, or adding some MCT or coconut oils to a classic diet.[18] Urinary ketone levels are checked daily to detect whether ketosis has been achieved and to confirm that the patient is following the diet, though the level of ketones does not correlate with an anticonvulsant effect.[19] This is performed using ketone test strips containing nitroprusside, which change colour from buff-pink to maroon in the presence of acetoacetate (one of the three ketone bodies).[45]


I actually clicked on the story just to see if they included anything about it’s use in managing chronic migraine. I have chronic migraine, basically intractable. Nothing has helped. I’ve tried medications, meditations, and everything in between including a bunch of dietary changes. Keto is my next consideration. I’m happy to hear it helped you! Thanks for sharing
Basically, carbohydrates are the primary source of energy production in body tissues. When the body is deprived of carbohydrates due to reducing intake to less than 50g per day, insulin secretion is significantly reduced and the body enters a catabolic state. Glycogen stores deplete, forcing the body to go through certain metabolic changes. Two metabolic processes come into action when there is low carbohydrate availability in body tissues: gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis.
The main limitations of our study are its small sample size, short duration, and lack of control group. That the main outcome, hemoglobin A1c, improved significantly despite the small sample size and short duration of follow-up speaks to the dramatic and consistent effect of the LCKD on glycemia. For other effects, however, such as the rises in serum LDL and HDL cholesterol, the small sample size might be the reason statistical significance was not reached. Future studies of larger samples and containing a control group are needed to better address questions about the effect of the LCKD on serum lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes.
My favorite sugar-free low carb BBQ sauce is a family recipe that I tweaked to make keto friendly. It is simple to prepare without a lot of added ingredients that aren’t necessary. You can find my recipe here. If you are looking for convenience, there are several brands that make a sugar-free variety that can be ordered from Amazon or you may find in your local stores. The only brand of store-bought sugar-free bbq sauce I have tried is by G. Hughes. They offer several different varieties, but I prefer hickory. I might be a little partial, but my homemade BBQ sauce makes this recipe taste much more authentic and flavorful.
Cereal is a tough one to give up when starting a low carb, grain-free or paleo diet. It’s easy to make, it’s tasty and it fills you up. For a little bit, anyway, before the subsequent blood sugar crash. But it turns out that you don’t have to give it up at all, as long as you are willing to make your own. And many of these low carb cereal recipes are almost as easy to make as grabbing the box from your cupboard and pouring cereal into your bowl. From granola to squares to hot cereals for a cold winter morning, we’ve got you covered.
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