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Well there are plenty low-carb bread options out there nowadays–we keep adding to this list of great low-carb breads–but what do you do about those pasta cravings? While a traditional slice of bread will pack 16 grams of carbs or more per slice, a serving of pasta is no joke! At 40+ grams of carbs for one cup of pasta, it is not easy on the blood sugar!
The brain is composed of a network of neurons that transmit signals by propagating nerve impulses. The propagation of this impulse from one neuron to another is typically controlled by neurotransmitters, though there are also electrical pathways between some neurons. Neurotransmitters can inhibit impulse firing (primarily done by γ-aminobutyric acid, or GABA) or they can excite the neuron into firing (primarily done by glutamate). A neuron that releases inhibitory neurotransmitters from its terminals is called an inhibitory neuron, while one that releases excitatory neurotransmitters is an excitatory neuron. When the normal balance between inhibition and excitation is significantly disrupted in all or part of the brain, a seizure can occur. The GABA system is an important target for anticonvulsant drugs, since seizures may be discouraged by increasing GABA synthesis, decreasing its breakdown, or enhancing its effect on neurons.[7]
After initiation, the child regularly visits the hospital outpatient clinic where they are seen by the dietitian and neurologist, and various tests and examinations are performed. These are held every three months for the first year and then every six months thereafter. Infants under one year old are seen more frequently, with the initial visit held after just two to four weeks.[9] A period of minor adjustments is necessary to ensure consistent ketosis is maintained and to better adapt the meal plans to the patient. This fine-tuning is typically done over the telephone with the hospital dietitian[19] and includes changing the number of calories, altering the ketogenic ratio, or adding some MCT or coconut oils to a classic diet.[18] Urinary ketone levels are checked daily to detect whether ketosis has been achieved and to confirm that the patient is following the diet, though the level of ketones does not correlate with an anticonvulsant effect.[19] This is performed using ketone test strips containing nitroprusside, which change colour from buff-pink to maroon in the presence of acetoacetate (one of the three ketone bodies).[45]

I needed a break from breakfast chia pudding, and I found this lovely recipe. I’ve been craving sugary cereals since I started Keto. I made this the night before and had it the next morning. This was everything I wanted and more, and also super simple to make. Mine weren’t as crunchy as I’d hoped (were still soft and cookie-like next day), but were still amazing! Probably because I stored them in the fridge overnight. Either way, delicious and nutritious and took me back to Cinnamon Toast Crunch, so 10/10!!


Hi Andrea, There is no added sugar in the recipe. The sweetener is natural, not fake, but it is not sugar and does not contribute any sugar. The 1g on the label comes from almond flour, which has no added sugar but almonds themselves have a tiny amount of sugars. For this recipe, make sure the chocolate you get is 100% cacao without any sugar added. Hope this helps.
The ketosis produced by fasting or limiting carbohydrate intake does not have negative effects for most people once the body has adapted to that state. The ketosis caused by diet has been referred to as dietary ketosis, physiological ketosis, benign dietary ketosis (Atkins), and, most recently, nutritional ketosis (Phinney and Volek), in an attempt to clear up possible confusion with diabetic ketoacidosis.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (LCKD) in overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes over 16 weeks. Specifically, we wanted to learn the diet's effects on glycemia and diabetes medication use in outpatients who prepared (or bought) their own meals. In a previous article, we reported the results observed in 7 individuals [10]; this report includes data from those 7 individuals along with data from additional participants enrolled subsequently.
On the ketogenic diet, carbohydrates are restricted and so cannot provide for all the metabolic needs of the body. Instead, fatty acids are used as the major source of fuel. These are used through fatty-acid oxidation in the cell's mitochondria (the energy-producing parts of the cell). Humans can convert some amino acids into glucose by a process called gluconeogenesis, but cannot do this by using fatty acids.[57] Since amino acids are needed to make proteins, which are essential for growth and repair of body tissues, these cannot be used only to produce glucose. This could pose a problem for the brain, since it is normally fuelled solely by glucose, and most fatty acids do not cross the blood–brain barrier. However, the liver can use long-chain fatty acids to synthesise the three ketone bodies β-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate and acetone. These ketone bodies enter the brain and partially substitute for blood glucose as a source of energy.[56]
A study with an intent-to-treat prospective design was published in 1998 by a team from the Johns Hopkins Hospital[20] and followed-up by a report published in 2001.[21] As with most studies of the ketogenic diet, no control group (patients who did not receive the treatment) was used. The study enrolled 150 children. After three months, 83% of them were still on the diet, 26% had experienced a good reduction in seizures, 31% had had an excellent reduction, and 3% were seizure-free.[Note 7] At 12 months, 55% were still on the diet, 23% had a good response, 20% had an excellent response, and 7% were seizure-free. Those who had discontinued the diet by this stage did so because it was ineffective, too restrictive, or due to illness, and most of those who remained were benefiting from it. The percentage of those still on the diet at two, three, and four years was 39%, 20%, and 12%, respectively. During this period, the most common reason for discontinuing the diet was because the children had become seizure-free or significantly better. At four years, 16% of the original 150 children had a good reduction in seizure frequency, 14% had an excellent reduction, and 13% were seizure-free, though these figures include many who were no longer on the diet. Those remaining on the diet after this duration were typically not seizure-free, but had had an excellent response.[21][22]
Hi, I’m still a bit skeptical, I have seen some of my friends do the keto diet, and have had good results. Though I am still not sure about the idea of the fats being eaten. They say they eat meat with the fat and must do so, is this correct? Also isn’t this not good for the body especially for the kidneys? Second, can a diabetic do this diet? There are many questions running through my head.
^ Freeman JM, Vining EP, Pillas DJ, Pyzik PL, Casey JC, Kelly LM. The efficacy of the ketogenic diet—1998: a prospective evaluation of intervention in 150 children. Pediatrics. 1998 Dec;102(6):1358–63. doi:10.1542/peds.102.6.1358. PMID 9832569. https://web.archive.org/web/20040629224858/http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/press/1998/DECEMBER/981207.HTM Lay summary]—JHMI Office of Communications and Public Affairs. Updated 7 December 1998. Cited 6 March 2008.
I began my low carb diet (around 50 net per day) almost 3 months ago. I have only lost 2 lbs. I need to lose at least 30. I am 62 years old and in good health. Everything I have read leads me to believe that I am doing everything correctly. I even make my own Keto bagels! What do you think could be the issue? I tried going down to less than 20 carbs but I just cannot do it. Thanks for any help you can provide.

Arguably the most challenging period of transitioning to a ketogenic diet is the first few days as your body adjusts to the dramatic decrease in carbohydrate intake and your metabolism begins its shift to fat as its primary fuel source. It is not uncommon during this period to experience a lack of energy, irritability, ravenous hunger, and brain fog, symptoms commonly referred to as the “low-carb flu.” These uncomfortable symptoms arise because a ketogenic diet eliminates the spikes in blood sugar that follow carb-heavy meals, keeping insulin levels low (because it is no longer needed in response to said blood sugar spikes) and triggering the kidneys to excrete high levels of electrolytes—think sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Additionally, many people transition to a ketogenic diet from a standard, modern diet, which was likely rich in processed foods packed with sodium, so electrolyte levels drop simply because you aren’t getting enough sodium to replace that which you previously took in from processed foods. In the end, if you do not replace these excreted and/or missing electrolytes in your new ketogenic diet, it can ultimately lead to a drop in blood pressure and bring about the symptoms of “low-carb flu.”

Maintaining a healthy weight has never been easy for me. I’ve struggled with sugar addiction and weight gain since I was a teen. You can read about my whole journey here and see Before pics as well. But since I’ve been low carb over the last 4 years I’ve been able to easily maintain my weight. Now with keto, I’m hoping to change my body even more. I may not lose “pounds” but just seeing these results shows the scale number is just one measurement and to me the body fat number is more important.
The ketogenic diet is usually initiated in combination with the patient's existing anticonvulsant regimen, though patients may be weaned off anticonvulsants if the diet is successful. Some evidence of synergistic benefits is seen when the diet is combined with the vagus nerve stimulator or with the drug zonisamide, and that the diet may be less successful in children receiving phenobarbital.[18]

Regardless of the reason you switched to a low carb diet, it’s important to be mindful of your daily macros and caloric intake. Watch alcohol intake because it is additional, and empty, calories and will hinder you reaching your goals. Alcohol metabolization stalls fat burning until it’s out of your system. Something we expand on further in our Guide to Keto Alcohol.
Hi Cathy, are you adapting these recipes yourself or are they already developed using coconut flour? From experience, it takes a lot of attempts to get it right (but fun too, it brings out the scientist in me). Coconut flour requires a high number of eggs for volume, thickening, protein, binding, and structure. I would be worried if there was too much avocado in there as that is just adding a soft ingredient that gives no structure. The sweet potato would add volume but unless there is enough eggs and coconut flour in the recipe, again it won’t add to the solidity of the final recipe. Psyllium I add purely to get a better crumb texture. It swells and thickens and helps bind all the other ingredients together nicely. Scones – they won’t have risen because of the lack of gluten (yay), but I quite like heavy scones as a personal choice. I started baking using recipes that had already been developed using these low-carb flours, and start by adjusting the flavours only not the ratios of the bulk ingredients. You will soon get the hang of them. Start with my flourless berry sponge, I use these ratios all-the-time! Yum.
The American Heart Association recommends eating six to eight servings of grains every day, which is a lot of carbohydrates. But whole grains also contain a lot of fiber, which is the basis for the recommendation. Fiber is bulky and slow to digest, so you feel full longer after a high-fiber meal. Fiber also aids in healthy elimination, which can keep you feeling – and looking – less bloated and sluggish. People who eat a high-fiber diet are at a lower risk for heart disease, strokes and certain types of cancers because fiber helps you avoid the insulin spikes that occur when you eat starchy carbs. Fiber also helps control your cholesterol levels.
AMAZING! I just made this bread and I can’t believe how perfect it is! My fiance and I are doing low carb. Not quite keto but trying to stay close to that range of carb intake! Honestly I’ve just been saying I’m avoiding bread, potatoes, and pasta. Either way this bread rocks. The only substitutions I made to the recipe was plain seltzer water in place of the still water. Wanted to give the dough some extra lift. I also put some pumpkin and sunflower seeds on top to increase the heartiness. This bread came out rocking our socks off. Can’t wait to make some grilled cheese Sammie’s with it!
Providing additional support Paoli et al. (17) examined the effect of a modified KD diet (~55% fat, 41% protein, and 4.5% CHO) on performance and body composition in gymnasts. In a crossover design, researchers compared independent 30-day dietary regimens consisting of “normal diet” (WD; 46.8% CHO, 38.5% fat, and 14.7% protein) and modified KD in nine elite male gymnasts. There were no significant changes from pre to post during either dietary intervention for measures of physical performance, indicating the absence of significant dietary CHO did not negatively impact physical ability. The post-KD measurements, however, saw a significant decrease in fat mass (pre: 5.3; post:
Early studies reported high success rates; in one study in 1925, 60% of patients became seizure-free, and another 35% of patients had a 50% reduction in seizure frequency. These studies generally examined a cohort of patients recently treated by the physician (a retrospective study) and selected patients who had successfully maintained the dietary restrictions. However, these studies are difficult to compare to modern trials. One reason is that these older trials suffered from selection bias, as they excluded patients who were unable to start or maintain the diet and thereby selected from patients who would generate better results. In an attempt to control for this bias, modern study design prefers a prospective cohort (the patients in the study are chosen before therapy begins) in which the results are presented for all patients regardless of whether they started or completed the treatment (known as intent-to-treat analysis).[19]
"The keto diet is primarily used to help reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures in children. While it also has been tried for weight loss, only short-term results have been studied, and the results have been mixed. We don't know if it works in the long term, nor whether it's safe," warns registered dietitian Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital.
Advocates for the diet recommend that it be seriously considered after two medications have failed, as the chance of other drugs succeeding is only 10%.[9][31][32] The diet can be considered earlier for some epilepsy and genetic syndromes where it has shown particular usefulness. These include Dravet syndrome, infantile spasms, myoclonic-astatic epilepsy, and tuberous sclerosis complex.[9][33]
It starts with limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” describes the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once consumed, simply don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. So that means subtracting grams of fiber from total carb games, to give you the total net carbs.
Hi Liz, Low carb bread doesn’t rise as well as one made with wheat flour, but it shouldn’t be quite that short. Some factors that might contribute include the age of your baking powder and how well the batter is mixed – the mixing process helps create air bubbles. Also, did you use baking soda or baking powder? They are not the same. Baking soda needs something to interact with, in this recipe I use baking powder. More baking powder *might* help, but is risky because using too much can cause it to fall even more flat.
So here is the deal, all of my clients tell me they want to eat more vegetables, but they are short on time and really don’t enjoy spending half their Sunday in the kitchen doing meal prep. And I HEAR YOU! So I’m trying to find new exciting ways to enjoy vegetables without spending hours in the kitchen. My solution, this low carb pasta recipe with only 3 ingredients. It’s ready in under 10 minutes!
Hi Jan, Sorry they didn’t work for you. It’s hard to say what happened without being in the kitchen with you. Did you use exactly the same ingredients and amounts? Also, if they were not cooked, then they probably needed to be in the oven for longer. If they were clumpy, it’s also possible that the almond flour wasn’t fine blanched (it needs to be) or the batter wasn’t mixed well enough. Hope this helps.
I don’t know anyone doing keto with cardiac issues, but yes for diabetes. I’ve noticed though many doctors are not promoting keto at all and it’s disappointing to be honest. I hope you’ll find out what works for you or at least your doctor will research it before saying it isn’t a good idea. Anyway, sound advice can be found from Jimmy Moore who has been doing keto for years and years and his website and podcasts are full of interviews with doctors. He’d probably be the best source of info for your condition. Best of luck to you!

In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones.

Almond flour is available in supermarkets and grocery stores, but you can find it for the lowest price when you buy it in bulk online. Make sure you purchase the finest blanched almond flour that has no darker specks of skin. The finer the grind of the almond flour, the finer the consistency of your baked goods and the easier it will be for your food to rise.
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