I actually went on a ketogenic diet last year to see if it would help my migraines. I have a history of chronic migraines which would usually last 3 days, sometimes longer. Triptans help a lot but I don’t like having to take them. I stayed in ketosis for about 8 months and experienced a significant reduction in migraines, from feeling some type of headache (mild o r severe) almost everyday to 1 or 2x per month while in ketosis. Although I’m very healthy otherwise, I do think my migraines may have something to do with blood sugar fluctuations (despite previously eating a whole foods diet and no refined carbs), and keto totally stabilized this. I eventually came off of Keto because I’m not really a meat lover. When I came off, but remained low carb, my migraines stayed under control for the most part. When I increase carbs, they do return.
Hi Barb, That can definitely be it. Losing when you are close to goal can be more difficult. It could also be that your body’s healthy weight is a little higher than what you’d like – which doesn’t mean you can’t lose, but makes it more difficult. If just eating Keto foods isn’t working, double check the macros for your weight and see if the amount you’re eating needs to be adjusted. You’ll find more help and support in our support group here.
Hi Debbie, Whole milk yogurt (whether cow milk or goat milk) is a person choice for a keto diet. It does contain some lactose, which is a sugar, but some people evidence suggests that there may be less than the label implies due to the beneficial bacteria in the yogurt. Either way, if you include it, be sure to get the plain kind without any added sugar.
I have been eating keto for few months and looked up so many bread recipes but yours looked the most doable and convincing. I must say this is the first time I baked bread.. ever and it turned out PERFECT!! I love you for sharing this recipe. I was a little apprehensive though because it looked rather thick so maybe a good point to indicate for new bakers like me. 🙂 Also, can I box and store in fridge (not freezer) for few days? Again thanks! I’ll be sure to try another one of your recipes soon when I am not feeling so lazy.

This was a great read. I aim to restrict carbs always because I believe most are why the American population is obese. I would very much like to hear more about carb restriction excluding the discussion on processed meats and processed high salt content foods because I consume neither. I also don’t consume dairy or eggs. So can you provide some substance.
People claiming huge benefits of these supplements – despite the lack of solid scientific support – may sometimes have a financial reason to believe in the supplements. Some of these products are sold under a multi-level marketing arrangement, where sales people are paid based on commission. For example, the company Prüvit sells drinkable ketones, called KETO//OS with a multi-level marketing structure.

A standby snack for everyone from toddlers to seniors, plain Cheerios are a moderately low-carb choice, with 20 grams per cup. Kay’s Naturals cereals in three flavors -- French vanilla, honey almond and apple cinnamon -- have 18 to 19 grams per 1.2-ounce serving. They get their sweet flavors from honey, sugar and stevia. Another low-carb choice is the soy-based cereal, Smaps, in cocoa or sweet maple flavors, which contain monk fruit or low-glycemic fruit concentrate and 8 grams of carbs per ½-cup serving.


Children who discontinue the diet after achieving seizure freedom have about a 20% risk of seizures returning. The length of time until recurrence is highly variable, but averages two years. This risk of recurrence compares with 10% for resective surgery (where part of the brain is removed) and 30–50% for anticonvulsant therapy. Of those who have a recurrence, just over half can regain freedom from seizures either with anticonvulsants or by returning to the ketogenic diet. Recurrence is more likely if, despite seizure freedom, an electroencephalogram shows epileptiform spikes, which indicate epileptic activity in the brain but are below the level that will cause a seizure. Recurrence is also likely if an MRI scan shows focal abnormalities (for example, as in children with tuberous sclerosis). Such children may remain on the diet longer than average, and children with tuberous sclerosis who achieve seizure freedom could remain on the ketogenic diet indefinitely.[46]
I think melted and solid coconut oil pretty much have the same volume, or if it changes, the amount of volume lost or gained is negligible 😉 Sometimes I make coconut oil bites by pouring 1-tbs servings of melted coconut oil mixed with something to give them flavours (matcha powder, raw cacao powder, essential oils, etc) on an ice cube tray and when they turn solid it looks like the volume is about the same.
I do not use the VLC mix to make yeast breads. I have recipes at the blog for cookies, cupcakes, biscuits, and crepes using this mix. I have dozens of recipes in various stages of testing that use this mix. Some of my favorites are quick breads and muffins and cookies. Cake type recipes (muffins, small loaves of bread, cupcakes, cake, etc.) really turn out well with this mix. Let me know how some other dishes turn out for you! Thanks!
Natural fat, high-fat sauces – Most of the calories on a keto diet should come from fat. You’ll likely get much of it from natural sources like meat, fish, eggs etc. But also use fat in cooking, like butter or coconut fat, and add plenty of olive oil to salads etc. You can also eat delicious high-fat sauces including Bearnaise sauce etc., or garlic butter (recipes).
I saw your recipe on Highfalutin today and since it is snowing I gave it a try to add to our chicken noodle soup. The recipe is super!!! Now we can have noodles without all of the carbs. The soup and noodles turned out so good. I used parchment paper and a cookie sheet that decided it needed a new wonky shape when heated( mixture was really thick on on side) but I was able to salvage all of the mix after repeatedly reheating the thicker portions until they were set. No sogginess in the noodles and they held up well in the soup. Kudo’s to your creativity! Now to try them in other things as mentioned in the comments that I didn’t read before making the recipe, whoops!!
I am a recent convert to using freeze-dried fruit and if you try this amazing crunchy granola you will see why. The fruit has a much more intense flavor than fresh berries and helps to add that fruity note to the nuts and coconut flakes. It also makes this cereal more child-friendly because the fruit turns the milk pink! This granola can also be formed into bars to give you a boost of energy through the day.
Hi all, keto here. This recipe “works” fine. I formed cute little cavatelli by pressing/rolling little cylinders of the dough off the tines of a fork. I fried them as directed and they kept their shape perfectly during frying and saucing. But the texture was still mush to the tooth. Also the coconut taste is present on the tongue, even though I cheated and floured the fork and my thumb with AP flour while forming the cavatelli. The coconut taste clashed with my bolognese sauce.
If you love eggplant, this recipe’s for you. If you don’t love eggplant yet, you will after whipping up this pasta-free dish. It comes together quickly for a lasagna that’s got all the flavor of the familiar version without the carbs. It’s also insanely flexible: peel or don’t peel the eggplant and make the slices as thick (or thin) as you like. Use jarred pasta sauce to speed things up even more.

From the study itself: “Mortality increased when carbohydrates were exchanged for animal-derived fat or protein and mortality decreased when the substitutions were plant-based … Low carbohydrate dietary patterns favouring animal-derived protein and fat sources, from sources such as lamb, beef, pork, and chicken, were associated with higher mortality, whereas those that favoured plant-derived protein and fat intake, from sources such as vegetables, nuts, peanut butter, and whole-grain breads, were associated with lower mortality, suggesting that the source of food notably modifies the association between carbohydrate intake and mortality.”

I made these tonight for supper (just finished eating) and they were fantastic! I simmered them in a mixture of chicken broth, soy sauce, hot sauce, garlic, and ginger, then added some leftover cooked veggies and chicken for an eastern-inspired chicken noodle soup. I didn’t find the noodles eggy, but it wouldn’t bother me if they were because I love me some eggs. I didn’t change a thing in the recipe (yes, I actually DID use the vital wheat gluten! 😀 ). I know I’ll be making these on a regular basis now – I think I’ll be riffing on the classic tuna noodle casserole later this week. Thanks so much for a wonderful recipe!

Health's contributing nutrition editor Cynthia Sass, RD, MPH, suggests looking for cereals that are made with nuts, seeds, coconut, a little bit of fruit, natural sweetener (think honey or agave syrup) instead of added sugar, and spices for flavor. Although many of these cereals may be gluten- or grain-free, you can also look for flaked whole grain varieties.
Physicians of ancient Greece treated diseases, including epilepsy, by altering their patients' diet. An early treatise in the Hippocratic Corpus, On the Sacred Disease, covers the disease; it dates from c. 400 BC. Its author argued against the prevailing view that epilepsy was supernatural in origin and cure, and proposed that dietary therapy had a rational and physical basis.[Note 3] In the same collection, the author of Epidemics describes the case of a man whose epilepsy is cured as quickly as it had appeared, through complete abstinence of food and drink.[Note 4] The royal physician Erasistratus declared, "One inclining to epilepsy should be made to fast without mercy and be put on short rations."[Note 5] Galen believed an "attenuating diet"[Note 6] might afford a cure in mild cases and be helpful in others.[11]
Early studies reported high success rates; in one study in 1925, 60% of patients became seizure-free, and another 35% of patients had a 50% reduction in seizure frequency. These studies generally examined a cohort of patients recently treated by the physician (a retrospective study) and selected patients who had successfully maintained the dietary restrictions. However, these studies are difficult to compare to modern trials. One reason is that these older trials suffered from selection bias, as they excluded patients who were unable to start or maintain the diet and thereby selected from patients who would generate better results. In an attempt to control for this bias, modern study design prefers a prospective cohort (the patients in the study are chosen before therapy begins) in which the results are presented for all patients regardless of whether they started or completed the treatment (known as intent-to-treat analysis).[19]
Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. I made it last night for the first time & it turned out perfect – just like your picture above! I used the big bowl of my Kitchen Aid food processor to grind the almonds & psyllium husks really finely, then I beat the eggs & coconut oil in the smaller bowl for a few minutes until it looked bubbly, then just added all the ingredients together in the big bowl & continued to process for a few minutes. I sprinkled sesame seeds on the top before putting it in the oven & after 55 minutes, it was perfectly cooked, had a good rise & our house smelt divine! The texture was also just right – soft & fluffy in the middle, golden & crunchy on the outside. I might add some other small seeds to the mix next time. Thank you so much – this is one of the nicest & easiest gf bread recipes I’ve come across!!! Keep up the great work xx 

There are many recipes here that use coconut flour OR almond flour. Some I even have instructions to use both (from the post above, you can see they are not easily interchangeable). Is he tolerant of almond flour? I have many recipes which use that. Some recipes that use a small quantity of almond flour/meal, you can actually use some seed flours such as sunflower or pumpkin. I managed to make Fat Head pizza once using ground sunflower seeds when I ran out of almond flour.


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When it comes to low carb breakfasts, it's easy to go the route of bacon and eggs. We all do it and it works great. It's filling, delicious and basically no carbs. But, some of us can get bored of that and want to change it up and that's where low carb cereals come into play. Now, I've tried many low carb cereals from Amazon and there are a few options, but they just aren't low carb enough. We wanted to change that, because as I've mentioned, cereal is my ultimate food. We even have a couple others recipes that utilize more than just the standard bacon and eggs. Give our Keto Oatmeal and Keto Macro Cakes a try!
I saw your recipe on Highfalutin today and since it is snowing I gave it a try to add to our chicken noodle soup. The recipe is super!!! Now we can have noodles without all of the carbs. The soup and noodles turned out so good. I used parchment paper and a cookie sheet that decided it needed a new wonky shape when heated( mixture was really thick on on side) but I was able to salvage all of the mix after repeatedly reheating the thicker portions until they were set. No sogginess in the noodles and they held up well in the soup. Kudo’s to your creativity! Now to try them in other things as mentioned in the comments that I didn’t read before making the recipe, whoops!!
While there are many different types of pasta today, the classic cooked, unenriched traditional pasta is about 30 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams. That’s your entire daily carbohydrate intake on the ketogenic diet, if you’re lucky. After that comes a minuscule 0.9 grams of fat, about 6 grams of protein and minimal micronutrients. Even whole wheat pasta, advertised as a health food, contains 37 grams of total carbohydrates[*].
Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
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