My son and I are totally in love with this! I hadn’t realized how much I *missed* cereal until I had a bowl of this. We found the recipe to be too sweet for our taste, so we doubled all the ingredients except the sweetener and that was perfect. For milk we mix 2/3c water and 1/3c heavy whipping cream, and each of us uses half of that for our bowl of cereal. We do have to keep it in the fridge, especially during the summer. It’s totally yummy!
ADA dieters can use it to cut the amount of carbohydrates from grains in their diet and to allow for other carbohydrate containing foods in the diet based on their recommended amounts. Walnut flour also contains healthy fats, fiber to help slow down the break down of other carbohydrates eaten with a meal and it’s got a great nut-buttery taste. The oils in the walnuts give it added flavor.
Sharon M. Nickols-Richardson, PhD, RD, , Mary Dean Coleman, PhD, RD, Joanne J. Volpe, Kathy W. Hosig, PhD, MPH, RD, “Perceived Hunger Is Lower and Weight Loss Is Greater in Overweight Premenopausal Women Consuming a Low-Carbohydrate/High-Protein vs High-Carbohydrate/Low-Fat Diet,” The Journal of Pediatrics: Vol 105, Issue 9: 1433–1437; September 2005. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000282230501151X.

I haven’t had great success converting chocolate chip cookie recipes. I think it’s because my expectations are for the cookies to taste like my daughter’s perfect, sugary-white=flour-amazing ones. And it just doesn’t happen. I do have my peanut butter cookie recipes up, and I put chocolate chips in those sometimes. Back to your question with the coconut flour. I expected to have to tweak recipes a lot more for the small amount of coconut flour in this mix, but it hasn’t been the case. Sometimes I add a little extra almond milk, but I haven’t had to increase the eggs like I thought I would have to. That said, I would start with your regular amounts and play with the dough and see. Another egg might be needed. I will be surprised if you get the original crispy/chewy texture, but please let me know if you do!!! 🙂
Please note that I am not a medical or nutritional professional. I am simply recounting and sharing my own experiences on this blog. Nothing I express here should be taken as medical advice and you should consult with your doctor before starting any diet or exercise program. I provide nutritional information for my recipes simply as a courtesy to my readers. It is calculated using MacGourmet software and I remove erythritol from the final carb count and net carb count, as it does not affect my own blood glucose levels. I do my best to be as accurate as possible but you should independently calculate nutritional information on your own before relying on them. I expressly disclaim any and all liability of any kind with respect to any act or omission wholly or in part in reliance on anything contained in this website.

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When you’re limiting carbs, cereals with dried fruit mixed in are best left on the shelf, because fruit increases the carb grams. Nuts are low in carbohydrates, so they add crunch and flavor without boosting the carb count. Three nutty cereals from Nutritious Living are lower-carb choices. Dr. Sears Zone Cereal in the honey almond flavor has 16 grams per ½-cup serving. It contains multiple grains and is sweetened with honey, molasses and evaporated cane juice crystals. Hi-Lo cereal comes in two nut-wielding flavors -- vanilla almond and maple pecan -- both with 13 grams of carbs per ½-cup serving. Like the regular flavor, these Hi-Lo cereals get their sweetness from an artificial sweetener, sucralose.
Natural fat, high-fat sauces – Most of the calories on a keto diet should come from fat. You’ll likely get much of it from natural sources like meat, fish, eggs etc. But also use fat in cooking, like butter or coconut fat, and add plenty of olive oil to salads etc. You can also eat delicious high-fat sauces including Bearnaise sauce etc., or garlic butter (recipes).

Arguably the most challenging period of transitioning to a ketogenic diet is the first few days as your body adjusts to the dramatic decrease in carbohydrate intake and your metabolism begins its shift to fat as its primary fuel source. It is not uncommon during this period to experience a lack of energy, irritability, ravenous hunger, and brain fog, symptoms commonly referred to as the “low-carb flu.” These uncomfortable symptoms arise because a ketogenic diet eliminates the spikes in blood sugar that follow carb-heavy meals, keeping insulin levels low (because it is no longer needed in response to said blood sugar spikes) and triggering the kidneys to excrete high levels of electrolytes—think sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Additionally, many people transition to a ketogenic diet from a standard, modern diet, which was likely rich in processed foods packed with sodium, so electrolyte levels drop simply because you aren’t getting enough sodium to replace that which you previously took in from processed foods. In the end, if you do not replace these excreted and/or missing electrolytes in your new ketogenic diet, it can ultimately lead to a drop in blood pressure and bring about the symptoms of “low-carb flu.”


I’ve been doing keto on and off for a year. Before that, I explored eliminating “inflammatory” or “reactive” foods based on another eating program. I have Celiac and autoimmune issues and I think one of the reasons people stall with Keto is because they are eating too many typically “inflammatory” foods–foods that your body has a harder time digesting and as a result create systemic inflammation which, in turn, cause weight loss plateaus. For those trying to fight through a Keto Plateau, I would suggest eliminating ALL dairy (try subbing ghee for butter), artificial sweeteners (including stevia and erythritol) and all nuts for 5 days. I know it sounds close to impossible but all three of these Keto staples are some of the biggest culprits of inflammation in the body. I found this suggestion on another Keto website and tried it and dropped 6 lbs in 5 days. Another typically inflammatory food is Eggs. If you can’t eliminate all of these foods at once, try eliminating one at a time for a minimum of 5 days and see if there is any movement on the scale. For those who have stalled, chances are at least one of your Keto staples is holding you up. Good luck!
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Donna the problem about using that much xantham gum in a recipe for gluten free is the problem. Usually when using xantham gum in a flour mix the general rule is 1 tsp per cup of flour or starch in the mix. so for this recipe there should only be 4 tsp of xantham gum not the 1/4 cup ( 4 Tbls) you call for. It should give you a less gelatinous texture and a much better taste. Another possibility to use instead of the xantham would be to use Psyllium husk powder. Hope this helps someone who might be finding it hard ro bake with the gluten free mix as written, try lowering the xantham gum to the levels I suggested.
Another amazing recipe!! I made these this morning and they came out great. I baked for 28 minutes. Mine didn’t rise very much, I used brand new baking powder but I must have measured something incorrectly. I used your knife method when taking out of the pan and then turned my pans upside down and tapped them and the donuts fell right out. I also bought the pans you suggested. They were a huge hit. Thank you!!
Want perfectly uniform mini burger patties? Try using a lid from a small jar, or a cookie cutter, as a form for your ground beef. You’ll have to find one that is the right size (slightly larger than you want the burger to be once it is cooked) but once you have it you’re good to go. Line the lid with plastic wrap to keep the ground beef from sticking inside of it!
While these sources have lower carbs, they typically have higher fat contents. For example, most nuts are calorically dense with fat, though most of it is good fats such as monounsaturated and polyunsaturated varieties. If someone is trying to reduce his fat intake as well as his carbohydrate intake, then it may be a good idea to look into low-carb flour varieties that also are low-fat, such as soy flour.
Still, whole wheat flour comes in about midway on our list of flours based on carbohydrate content, so it’s got a little less than 45 carbohydrates per half cup, and comes in mid-range for GI at 69, You may find that you want to sneak whole wheat flour into your recipes, by adding a little at a time and working up to where you have mostly whole-wheat bread.
This is REALLY good. My OH also thought that this was ‘proper’ bread LOL! Why do people think that anything not made with wheat is not ‘proper’? I guess they don’t have a gluten intolerance. This really is the best low carb GF bread I’ve tasted in a LONG while. It will become a staple in this household that’s for sure. Will definitely still use the 90 second rolls as well for convenience! 

Goday A, Bellido D, Sajoux I, Crujeiras AB, Burguera B, García-Luna PP, Oleaga A, Moreno B, Casanueva FF. Short-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of a very low-calorie-ketogenic diet interventional weight loss program versus hypocaloric diet in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Nutr Diabetes. 2016 Sep 19;6(9):e230. [PMC free article: PMC5048014] [PubMed: 27643725]
Every meal should include a heaping portion of low-carb veggies, like leafy greens, broccoli, and cauliflower, which provide the essential nutrients for optimal health. Vegetables that should be limited due to their higher carbohydrate content include all root vegetables: potatoes, carrots, and parsnips fall into this category, unfortunately. Fruits should be consumed with caution, as well, because they contain high amounts of sugar (read: carbohydrates).
Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.
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