While CHO is almost universally regarded as necessary for both health and athletic performance, many studies have called into question the absolute necessity of dietary CHO. As early as 1930 there was evidence demonstrating the efficacy of long-term CHO restriction (14). In an audacious attempt to demonstrate proof-of-concept, arctic explorers Dr. Viljalmur Stefansson and K. Anderson, agreed to participate in a study that involved one year of eating a diet that consisted solely of “meat.” The diet, which consisted of beef, pork, lamb, and chicken, also included significant portions of animal fat, as well as organ meat. This dietary regimen yielded a macronutrient distribution of approximately 81% fat, 18% protein and 1% CHO, over the course of 375 days. The subjects experienced a modest reduction in weight, which occurred during the first week; there were no restrictions on food portions, subjects ate to satisfy appetite. Interestingly, the researchers noted no vitamin deficiencies, no significant change in mental alertness or physical impairment, or any other deficit attributed to eating a high fat, all-meat diet.


When you eat foods high in carbohydrates and fat, your body naturally produces glucose. Carbohydrates are the easiest thing for the body to process, and therefore it will use them first – resulting in the excess fats to be stored immediately. In turn, this causes weight gain and health problems that are associated with high fat, high carbohydrate diets (NOT keto).
Goday A, Bellido D, Sajoux I, Crujeiras AB, Burguera B, García-Luna PP, Oleaga A, Moreno B, Casanueva FF. Short-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of a very low-calorie-ketogenic diet interventional weight loss program versus hypocaloric diet in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Nutr Diabetes. 2016 Sep 19;6(9):e230. [PMC free article: PMC5048014] [PubMed: 27643725]
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Kossoff EH, Zupec-Kania BA, Amark PE, Ballaban-Gil KR, Bergqvist AG, Blackford R, et al. Optimal clinical management of children receiving the ketogenic diet: recommendations of the International Ketogenic Diet Study Group. Epilepsia. 2009 Feb;50(2):304–17. doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2008.01765.x. PMID 18823325
Because I don’t think it does work as well. If you use it that way and you like it great but I can’t recommend it because I didn’t like the texture the times that I tried it in this recipe. Each recipe is tested several times… usually by several people… and this one everyone who tried it liked the original better than the xanthan gum. SO… now you know why I keep saying there’s no substitute. 🙂
Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. I made it last night for the first time & it turned out perfect – just like your picture above! I used the big bowl of my Kitchen Aid food processor to grind the almonds & psyllium husks really finely, then I beat the eggs & coconut oil in the smaller bowl for a few minutes until it looked bubbly, then just added all the ingredients together in the big bowl & continued to process for a few minutes. I sprinkled sesame seeds on the top before putting it in the oven & after 55 minutes, it was perfectly cooked, had a good rise & our house smelt divine! The texture was also just right – soft & fluffy in the middle, golden & crunchy on the outside. I might add some other small seeds to the mix next time. Thank you so much – this is one of the nicest & easiest gf bread recipes I’ve come across!!! Keep up the great work xx
The ketogenic diet reduces seizure frequency by more than 50% in half of the patients who try it and by more than 90% in a third of patients.[18] Three-quarters of children who respond do so within two weeks, though experts recommend a trial of at least three months before assuming it has been ineffective.[9] Children with refractory epilepsy are more likely to benefit from the ketogenic diet than from trying another anticonvulsant drug.[1] Some evidence indicates that adolescents and adults may also benefit from the diet.[9]

In trying to decrease carbs I have tried a few recipes for baked goods but they’re a bit “off”. One was a brownie recipe using coconut flour, avocados & sweet potatoes. It tasted pretty good but the texture was almost custard like. Would have allowing it to rest & thicken before baking have helped? I wondered about using psyllium husk to thicken or make it more dense. Maybe 3 instead of 4 eggs?? The other recipe was a traditional scone recipe that I adjusted. I used half wheat flour and almond flour. They tasted fantastic but were just a bit too moist and didnt rise as typical which I expected from the reading I did beforehand. Do you have advise on leavening agents? I found “use a little bit more” in a recipe where almond flour is substituted but there was no percentage or specifics on how much “a little bit more” meant… My brain is swirling in trouble-shooting overload!
It's not the easiest plan to follow, but the theory of ketosis as a possible prevention against disease is gaining attention from cancer specialists. Tumor immunologist Dr. Patrick Hwu, one of the leading cancer specialists in the U.S., has followed the keto diet for four years, although he prefers to call it the fat-burning metabolism diet, or fat-burning diet. More research is needed to prove its benefits, but Hwu, the head of cancer medicine at MD Anderson in Houston, believes in it after seeing improvements in his own health.
A common question is whether you can substitute almond flour for coconut flour and the other way around. Yes, often you can but not in equal amounts. 1 cup of almond flour can be substituted for 1/3 cup of coconut flour. 1/3 cup of coconut flour can be substituted for 2/3 cup almond flour + 1.5 tablespoons of ground psyllium husk powder. The amounts may need to be adjusted depending on what brands you’re using.
Normal dietary fat contains mostly long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are more ketogenic than LCTs because they generate more ketones per unit of energy when metabolised. Their use allows for a diet with a lower proportion of fat and a greater proportion of protein and carbohydrate,[18] leading to more food choices and larger portion sizes.[4] The original MCT diet developed by Peter Huttenlocher in the 1970s derived 60% of its calories from MCT oil.[15] Consuming that quantity of MCT oil caused abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting in some children. A figure of 45% is regarded as a balance between achieving good ketosis and minimising gastrointestinal complaints. The classical and modified MCT ketogenic diets are equally effective and differences in tolerability are not statistically significant.[9] The MCT diet is less popular in the United States; MCT oil is more expensive than other dietary fats and is not covered by insurance companies.[18]
Like any other fad diet, you can lose weight and see some positive results in the short term, but what effect does a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet have on your long-term health? Recent research published by The Lancet studied the eating patterns of more than 15,400 adults in the U.S. and another 432,000 people around the world. Researchers found that restricted carbohydrate levels replaced or supplemented by animal-based protein and fat sources could lead to a higher risk of premature death.
I’d heard recommendations of using only egg whites with psyllium, but whole eggs are more convenient. Besides, egg yolks are a natural leavener, so including them, makes the bread rise better in combination with the baking powder. Fortunately, whole eggs worked! It turns out that my friend, Lisa from Low Carb Yum, used whole eggs in her coconut flour psyllium husk bread, too.
 hi . i need to start keto. my macros are 17 gram carb , 113 grams fat and 68 grams protein . i have looked at many recipes . i have tried to make a personal meal plan for myself . im struggling big time to get it all to telly.  In a day , should only the carbs balance out ? By that I mean the meals I’m having for breakfast lunch and dinner should all add up to 17 grams of carbs but then my fat amount goes a bit higher and the protein I can’t get to only 68 grams.  I have looked at diet doctor recipes and it’s all mind boggling.  I don’t know how to plan my meals . Can you please give me suggestions and advice ?

Keep eating low carb to continue losing weight, feeling good and becoming healthier!Try making any of our hundreds of recipes available on the site. We make sure each and every recipe is delicious, nutritious and will keep you under your daily carb limit, even if you go for seconds. In addition, we provide step-by-step instructions to make the process as easy as possible. If you ever run into any issues or have any questions, be sure to leave a comment or contact us directly! We’re always happy to help.

You can find all my recipes on the main landing page of my website. There’s a search bar at the top and you can type anything you’re looking for, if I’ve made a recipe for it you’ll see it. Also there’s a tab at the top of the page that says recipe index and a ton of categories for you to find what you’re looking for. If you want to never miss a new recipe, I post twice weekly, you can subscribe to my website by adding you email address in the middle of the landing page, that says, Never Miss a Recipe. Hope that helps!

I have been on a low carb keto diet for more than a year. As T2DM my A1C dropped from 9% to 5.4% & I discontinued meds. All my lipids improved even with ample healthy saturated fat. More than a year now so I wonder why this would be a short term improvement when its obvious that I will not go back to a high A1C and taking 3 diabetes medications including sulphonylureas. It is clear from this article that you lack the necessary experience that would be gained from wholeheartedly trying the diet or monitoring patients doing it properly like me. I would be probably be facing my first amputation if I believed the negativity in your article. So for people with diabetes who may be dissuaded by your article. Ignore it and take back your health by restricting carbs (<25 g a day) or as low as you reasonably can below 130g while being satisfied that you are getting adequate nutrition.
Rev, We are thrilled to tell you that we have a bread book coming out in September that has a ton of great keto bread recipes! Here are the links if you want to take a look: Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Keto-Bread-Muffins-Low-Carb-Keto-Friendly/dp/1507210906/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1549287717&sr=8-1&keywords=9781507210901 and Barnes and Noble link is now available here: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/books/1130507963?ean=9781507210901

In the absence of CHO, however, the body must shift to fat as the primary energy source. In this case, the body catabolizes stored triglycerides, which exist in abundance in even the leanest individual. In effect, the KD provokes a physiological stimulus, i.e., CHO restriction, that mimics starvation. Due to the limited ability to store or produce CHO during periods of starvation, the body thus switches to ketogenesis, the production of ketone bodies as a primary fuel source (3).
For patients who benefit, half achieve a seizure reduction within five days (if the diet starts with an initial fast of one to two days), three-quarters achieve a reduction within two weeks, and 90% achieve a reduction within 23 days. If the diet does not begin with a fast, the time for half of the patients to achieve an improvement is longer (two weeks), but the long-term seizure reduction rates are unaffected.[44] Parents are encouraged to persist with the diet for at least three months before any final consideration is made regarding efficacy.[9]
I think melted and solid coconut oil pretty much have the same volume, or if it changes, the amount of volume lost or gained is negligible 😉 Sometimes I make coconut oil bites by pouring 1-tbs servings of melted coconut oil mixed with something to give them flavours (matcha powder, raw cacao powder, essential oils, etc) on an ice cube tray and when they turn solid it looks like the volume is about the same. 

Participants were recruited from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) outpatient clinics. Inclusion criteria were age 35–75 years; body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2; and fasting serum glucose >125 mg/dL or hemoglobin A1c >6.5% without medications, or treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) and/or insulin. Exclusion criteria were evidence of renal insufficiency, liver disease, or unstable cardiovascular disease by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. All participants provided written informed consent approved by the institutional review board. No monetary incentives were provided.
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