I’ve made them so far only once and they turned out great!!! I was able to roll the sheet up like a jelly roll and cut them so they were long noodles. I used them for spaghetti. Yummylicious ???? Also reheated them in the microwave the next day with no prob. I am planning on lasagna this week and can’t wait. I’m also going to make tuna casserole-the idea put in my head from reading your posts. I will also try some garlic powder just for fun. You are a very tolerate person for so many ridiculous posts I’ve read. I am very grateful I have found your site and am a forever fan????
Hi Woody, Yeast works by consuming sugar (either added sugar or sugar in wheat flour), so it would not work with these ingredients. You could try adding some yeast *and* some sugar (knowing that the yeast would consume most of it), but I haven’t experimented with that. Aside from that, mixing the batter well can help create more air bubbles, and make sure you are using fresh baking powder.
Being healthy is all about getting the right nutrients and vitamins from your food so always include variety in your diet. Have plenty of meat (or fish), dairy and veggies on a daily basis based on this low carb food list. Use coconut oil and olive oil when you cook and in your salads (respectively) and have a handful of nuts or berries from time to time.
VEGETABLES: Before you think that veggies are an unconventional breakfast choice, remember the omelet. Add half a cup of cooked spinach (3.5 grams of fiber) and two cups of mushrooms, which cook down to half a cup, (add 2.4 grams) and you'll have a fiber bonanza. Add a half cup of black beans (7.5 grams) to your eggs by whipping up huevos rancheros or a breakfast burrito wrapped in a low-carb tortilla (9 grams). Don't forget the salsa; it doesn't have appreciable fiber content, but it does make things taste better.
I have great respect for Harvard Medical School. I notice that they support their readers posting comments and I am most appreciative of the article and all the many thoughtful comments by the readers. The readers seem to have the most expertise here and I hope that the doctor who wrote the article will think long and hard about the comments by readers. After 35 years of clinical practice in mental health, I notice that all issues of emotion involve medical issues, nutrition, and the gut bacteria. I would say that these issues and all of the executive brain functions seem to improve with ketogenic principles. For those that apply it in a flexible and smart manner, it appears to improve every area of their lives. I strongly encourage the author of the article to take one class via The Institute for Functional Medicine. If he is open to more learning he can take more classes and get certified. I’m sure a fine doctor, he will be an even better doctor and personally healthier, if he gets more training. Are we all open to new learning(especially us healthcare providers)?

I made these yesterday using straight from the fridge eggs and cream cheese, parchment paper sprayed with cooking spray (I folded up the sides of the paper to prevent leakage), and a mini-chopper. Even with these imperfect tools my noodles were perfect. I was able to just tilt the pan until the batter was covering the entire area, which made them fairly thin and a few on one side were over-done but still were fine in my faux chicken faux noodle soup. They cut easily and slid right off the paper. My kids had nothing bad to say either! I will make them thicker next time for eating in a sauce as they are fairly soft but did hold up in the soup and even by lunch today were still great. Thank you!
I was wondering if you have created some flour mixes to replace all purpose. Like a keto flour mix of sorts. I am also wondering, if with any other gluten free flour mix, the amounts of binder like xantham gum, guar gum, or gelatin would apply following the same rules of a non-keto flour mix. I found this recipe but haven’t tried it: https://donnareish.com/low-carb-flour-mix/

If you prefer hot to cold cereal, Sensato makes a High Fiber Hot Cereal that comes in five flavors: plain, apple cinnamon, butter pecan, “strawberrilicious,” and vanilla almond. The cereal is sweetened with artificial sweetener, so there are no calories from sugar. Each serving has about 12 grams of carbs, ten of which are fiber. The cereal is a mix of wheat bran, flax seed meal, and soy protein isolate.

Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
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