Almond flour and almond meal are not the same thing. Almond meal is ground up almonds (with the skins) whereas almond flour is finely ground blanched almonds without the skins. Both work but the almond flour will give you better results (the almond meal tends to be a little dense and oily). Almond flour can be purchased online and almond meal can be found at health food stores.
Use our premium meal planner tool (free trial) to access tons of weekly meal plans, complete with shopping lists. You can adapt the plans to your liking, skipping any meal, choosing how many people you’re cooking for, and the shopping lists adapt. You can even start a new plan from scratch (of from pre-existing ones), tailor them completely and save them.
Hi John, Thank you for the feedback. Sometimes this bread takes a little more effort to rise and the batter has to be mixed well to create air bubbles. Use very fresh baking powder, too. The bluish tint can come from an interaction with the psyllium husk powder, and the brand I use (linked on the recipe card) doesn’t usually do this, but either way it’s safe to eat. I’m glad you still liked it!
WY conceived, designed, and coordinated the study; participated in data collection; performed statistical analysis; and drafted the manuscript. MF assisted with study design, performed data collection, and helped to draft the manuscript. AC analyzed the food records. MV assisted with study/intervention design and safety monitoring. EW participated in the conception and design of the study, and assisted with the statistical analysis. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.
At 60 minutes, the bread showed as done with a toothpick. Removed it from the oven and it sank down the center. I waited 15 minutes. Cut a piece off and it was wet, like not done in the center. I baked it 15 more min and it stayed the same. Is it supposed to be wet/moist like, maybe it’s oily from the coconut oil? If it’s supposed to be completely dry but moist, not wet, then something went wrong.
Emmy-award nominated screenwriter Brynne Chandler is a single mother of three who divides her time between professional research and varied cooking, fitness and home & gardening enterprises. A running enthusiast who regularly participates in San Francisco's Bay to Breakers run, Chandler works as an independent caterer, preparing healthy, nutritious meals for Phoenix area residents. Her work has appeared in The Houston Chronicle and San Francisco Chronicle, among other places. She is hard at work on her first cookbook which combines simple, fresh recipes with science-based herbal medicine.
I swap out the Erythritol and 100% cacao for 2 squares of 90% cacao (I’ve been using a Lindt candy bar; they were on sale). I use just a bit over 1/8 tsp. of baking powder. I add a touch of pink Himalayan sea salt. I microwave it for 42 seconds (1100 watts), Set a Tbsp. of peanut butter on top, make my coffee (gives the peanut butter time to soften/melt), dump the measuring spoon out and spread it around a bit. Absolutely perfect. (note: this is a VERY DARK CHOCOLATE TASTING CAKE, if you don’t usually eat dark chocolate, you will want to stick with the original recipe!)

At the first visit, participants were instructed how to follow the LCKD as individuals or in small groups, with an initial goal of ≤20 g carbohydrate per day. Participants were taught the specific types and amounts of foods they could eat, as well as foods to avoid. Initially, participants were allowed unlimited amounts of meats, poultry, fish, shellfish, and eggs; 2 cups of salad vegetables per day; 1 cup of low-carbohydrate vegetables per day; 4 ounces of hard cheese; and limited amounts of cream, avocado, olives, and lemon juice. Fats and oils were not restricted except that intake of trans fats was to be minimized. Participants were provided a 3-page handout and a handbook [11] detailing these recommendations. Participants prepared or bought all of their own meals and snacks following these guidelines.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Kossoff EH, Zupec-Kania BA, Amark PE, Ballaban-Gil KR, Bergqvist AG, Blackford R, et al. Optimal clinical management of children receiving the ketogenic diet: recommendations of the International Ketogenic Diet Study Group. Epilepsia. 2009 Feb;50(2):304–17. doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2008.01765.x. PMID 18823325

The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was developed for treatment of paediatric epilepsy in the 1920s and was widely used into the next decade, but its popularity waned with the introduction of effective anticonvulsant medications. This classic ketogenic diet contains a 4:1 ratio by weight of fat to combined protein and carbohydrate. This is achieved by excluding high-carbohydrate foods such as starchy fruits and vegetables, bread, pasta, grains, and sugar, while increasing the consumption of foods high in fat such as nuts, cream, and butter.[1] Most dietary fat is made of molecules called long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). However, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs)—made from fatty acids with shorter carbon chains than LCTs—are more ketogenic. A variant of the classic diet known as the MCT ketogenic diet uses a form of coconut oil, which is rich in MCTs, to provide around half the calories. As less overall fat is needed in this variant of the diet, a greater proportion of carbohydrate and protein can be consumed, allowing a greater variety of food choices.[4][5]
Ground psyllium husk powder is 100% pulverized psyllium husk shells and is used to give a bread-like texture to what you’re baking. Due to its high fiber content it’s often sold as a laxative which can be good to know if you have a sensitive digestive system. When adding it to a liquid it turns into a gel-like substance. It works a bit like gluten in traditional baking, and makes it possible to handle the dough when rolling or shaping it.
To make cocoa puff balls (takes a LOT more time, but they’re REALLY fun): pinch a little thumbnail sized amount of dough and roll between your hands to form a ball. Place on the baking sheet. Bake for 8 minutes, then take baking sheet from oven and carefully move the balls around so they cook on the other side. Place bake in the oven and cook another 5 minutes. Allow to cool and enjoy!
Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.
Protein can turn into carbohydrates via a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis (making new carbs) and will do in people at varying degrees. Protein turning into carbohydrates means you’re not in ketosis. However, this is generally an overblown statement that only happens at the extreme cases when you are drinking a lot of liquid protein shakes. 
Around this time, Bernarr Macfadden, an American exponent of physical culture, popularised the use of fasting to restore health. His disciple, the osteopathic physician Dr. Hugh William Conklin of Battle Creek, Michigan, began to treat his epilepsy patients by recommending fasting. Conklin conjectured that epileptic seizures were caused when a toxin, secreted from the Peyer's patches in the intestines, was discharged into the bloodstream. He recommended a fast lasting 18 to 25 days to allow this toxin to dissipate. Conklin probably treated hundreds of epilepsy patients with his "water diet" and boasted of a 90% cure rate in children, falling to 50% in adults. Later analysis of Conklin's case records showed 20% of his patients achieved freedom from seizures and 50% had some improvement.[10] 

I am so excited to have found your blog. I have been doing the low carb thing myself to lose weight and get more healthy for 4 months(and it’s working really well). But once I’ve finished losing the weight, I want to maintain a lower carb lifestyle for myself and my family. But by lower, I mean maybe 50-80 net carbs a day. I want to include yeast bread on occasion, beans, etc. But I’ve been looking for a LOWER carb yeast bread. I don’t have any restrictions which would exclude gluten, dairy, meat, nuts, etc. I normally make homemade whole wheat bread for my kids from freshly ground wheat (I grind myself). Do you have any recipes that are lower carb than regular whole wheat bread, but wouldn’t necessarily be low enough to fit a 20-30 net carb/day diet. I find that making changes a little at a time works very well with a family and myself. I’d like to take a regular whole wheat bread and tweak it to lower the carbs without greatly sacrificing taste. Also need to learn more on soaking and sprouting to get past the problem of phytates & other anti-nutrients. I am totally willing to do that. Anything you can share or suggestions of recipes to try greatly appreciated! I’ve tried searching “lower carb yeast whole wheat bread” on google or including the word gluten, then I get all the gluten free vegan recipes and so forth that are really low carb, just no luck until now!
While everyone needs to eat carbohydrates, some people need more carbs than others. People who are very active need to eat more carbs than people who are sedentary. Those with diabetes also usually need to limit the amount of carbohydrates they consume during each meal to help keep their blood sugar levels in check. Finally, people on low-carb diets such as the Atkins or South Beach diets may limit their carbohydrate intakes in an attempt to boost weight loss.
This is the second recipe for a cinnamon toast cereal I’ve tried and failed at miserably! I want to know details when baking, it is a science after all. How did you spread this on the sheet pan, how thick, was it rolled? Too much missing I formation! I’m finding a lot of keto or low carb recipes are like this, very discouraging and extremely disappointing from this community. Details PLEASE!

Family Friendly (FF): Again, to make this more Family-Friendly—or to just create a healthier baking mix for your family that is not reliant on processed or over-consumed white flour and other grains, you can do a couple of things: (1) Make this as it is listed and use it half and half with oat flour, quinoa flour, sprouted wheat, or other higher-carb flours that bake up more like regular grains; (2) Make this almost as it is given but use a higher carb flour for any of the really low ones. For example, if you use Bob’s Red Mill Oat Flour or sprouted white wheat flour for some of the flours, you can still end up with a forty-carb-per-cup mix that is healthy as opposed to a one-hundred-carb-per-cup grain (white or wheat flour) that is less healthy. Family-Friendly Low Carbing is a very healthy approach to baking! (3) Make this as is and use it combined with my Sprouted Flour Mix as needed to “dilute” the tastes.
A survey in 2005 of 88 paediatric neurologists in the US found that 36% regularly prescribed the diet after three or more drugs had failed, 24% occasionally prescribed the diet as a last resort, 24% had only prescribed the diet in a few rare cases, and 16% had never prescribed the diet. Several possible explanations exist for this gap between evidence and clinical practice.[34] One major factor may be the lack of adequately trained dietitians, who are needed to administer a ketogenic diet programme.[31]
Hi Mel, Assuming that your ranch dressing doesn’t have sugar added, you don’t need to worry too much about limiting it, but within reason. This is my homemade ranch dressing recipe, which has 0.9g net carbs per 2-tbsp serving. It would be hard to find a store bought one with much less than that, even though some round anything less than 1g down to 0g, which isn’t truly accurate. Also, keep in mind that if weight loss is your goal, some people find that too much dairy can cause a stall. Finally, make sure you aren’t using all your “available” carbs on ranch dressing – have it with some low carb veggies!
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