Melanie, curious to know what the quality of the foods you are eating? Organic? Grass fed Beef/butter? What oils are the using for fats? And do you think you are getting enough dark leafy greens, which give you the nutrient density needed to detox well? toxins stored in fat cells can cause issues with weight lose. looking into these topics and some light tweaks may help you with your goals! Best of luck!

If you are facing a really busy day and don’t have time to cook eggs and bacon, you could rustle up this filling and delicious grain and gluten-free cereal to get the whole family off to a healthy start. It takes a few minutes to cook, then you can enjoy this warming bowlful either on its own or with some fresh berries for added fruitiness. Perfect for a busy family!


I guess the closest would be almond flour/ground almonds but there is not a direct substitution because wheat flour behave totally differently because it has gluten. Great question to ask and I am so glad you are starting low carb. Begin by baking an established low carb recipe first. All the hard recipe development has been done for you. Enjoy, and welcome.
Hi Vivian – I am 60 yo and researching Keto and would love more information from you since we are same age. What is TDEE? What fat sources do you use and how much daily? What are some meals you make regularly and what does a day of food look like? What is the easiest/best way to count carbs getting started? If you and Brenda are ok with you giving me your email I would love to learn more from you! I just need some help getting started. Brenda – thank you for all your information and recipes!
I was on the ketogenic diet for 6 months to support my husband, who is on it permanently for epilepsy. The diet totally messed with my hormones, which my doctor and my husband’s nutritionist sadly confirmed was a possibility. I am continuing to eat low-carb, but the ketogenic thing unfortunately seemed to work against me as a 49-year old pre-menopausal woman.

Fat: Most of the calories in a ketogenic diet come from fat, which is used for energy. The exact amount of fat a person needs to eat will depend on carbohydrate and protein intake, how many calories they use during the day, and whether they are losing weight (using their body fat for energy). Depending on these factors, somewhere in the range of 60 to 80 percent of calories will come from fats on a ketogenic diet (even up to 90 percent on, for example, the Ketogenic Diet for Epilepsy). People tend not to overeat on diets this high in fat, so calorie counting is rarely necessary.
I really love this bread the taste and texture, but I just can’t get the bread to rise. It always falls in the middle even before it is finished baking and continues to fall while cooling. The slice of bread looks like a sway back horse. It will rise and look wonderful and then start falling in the middle while baking. I’ve added a tablespoon of Baking Soda, increase the water to 1.5 cups, tried glass and metal loaf pans, baking at a higher temperature but nothing works. Can anyone help me with this falling in the middle problem?
I’ve been doing keto on and off for a year. Before that, I explored eliminating “inflammatory” or “reactive” foods based on another eating program. I have Celiac and autoimmune issues and I think one of the reasons people stall with Keto is because they are eating too many typically “inflammatory” foods–foods that your body has a harder time digesting and as a result create systemic inflammation which, in turn, cause weight loss plateaus. For those trying to fight through a Keto Plateau, I would suggest eliminating ALL dairy (try subbing ghee for butter), artificial sweeteners (including stevia and erythritol) and all nuts for 5 days. I know it sounds close to impossible but all three of these Keto staples are some of the biggest culprits of inflammation in the body. I found this suggestion on another Keto website and tried it and dropped 6 lbs in 5 days. Another typically inflammatory food is Eggs. If you can’t eliminate all of these foods at once, try eliminating one at a time for a minimum of 5 days and see if there is any movement on the scale. For those who have stalled, chances are at least one of your Keto staples is holding you up. Good luck! 

5. Ciao Carb: Like Carba-Nada, there are still plenty of carbs in this pasta, but fewer than traditional pasta, at 17 grams per serving after subtracting the fiber. Made with a variety of soy, gluten, wheat, and egg, in my opinion these don’t come anywhere near the wholesomeness of the bean pasta varieties at the top of this list. But if you’re looking for something that looks like pasta and tastes like pasta, without quite as much carby-boom, this will do it for you!
Health's contributing nutrition editor Cynthia Sass, RD, MPH, suggests looking for cereals that are made with nuts, seeds, coconut, a little bit of fruit, natural sweetener (think honey or agave syrup) instead of added sugar, and spices for flavor. Although many of these cereals may be gluten- or grain-free, you can also look for flaked whole grain varieties.

Carbs in fruits and veggies do count, but you don’t add up the carbs and sugar. Sugar is already included in the carbs – it’s just listed separately on labels because some people want to see a breakdown of how much of the carbs are sugars (versus other, complex carbs). If it says 2g carbs and 2g sugar, it means there is 2g total carbs and all of them are sugar (in this case).
Made this today for my husband. It is delicious. I used coconut oil (the hard kind) and added 1 tsp of cinnamon. Only problem is that it did not crisp up. It’s more “bendy” than crispy. Not dry enough. Definitely baked it long enough. Should I use less coconut oil next time. Any ideas. Thanks. I will definitely make again because the taste is awesome.
As with cold cereals, your best bet for a low-carb breakfast cereal comes in the form of whole grains. Oatmeal is an excellent choice because it is high in fiber and contains a substance called beta-glucan, which slows down the digestive process. That means you will stay full throughout the morning. Bran cereals can also be eaten hot, and whole grains such as quinoa or grits can be flavored to be either savory or sweet. Quinoa goes especially well with walnuts and raisins, dates or dried figs. It is is also scrumptious when flavored with a little bit of coriander and served with a poached egg on top. Grits are also a natural partner for eggs, but they are also delicious with pecans and fresh blueberries. Drizzle a bit of honey, agave or real maple syrup on top for sweetness. This will increase the carb count a bit, but the nutritional benefits of starting your day with a hearty, hot breakfast are more than worth the few extra carbs.

The remaining calories in the keto diet come from protein — about 1 gram (g) per kilogram of body weight, so a 140-pound woman would need about 64 g of protein total. As for carbs: “Every body is different, but most people maintain ketosis with between 20 and 50 g of net carbs per day,” says Mattinson. Total carbohydrates minus fiber equals net carbs, she explains.
The popular low-carb diets (such as Atkins or Paleo) modify a true keto diet. But they come with the same risks if you overdo it on fats and proteins and lay off the carbs. So why do people follow the diets? "They're everywhere, and people hear anecdotally that they work," McManus says. Theories about short-term low-carb diet success include lower appetite because fat burns slower than carbs. "But again, we don't know about the long term," she says. "And eating a restrictive diet, no matter what the plan, is difficult to sustain. Once you resume a normal diet, the weight will likely return."

The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]
If you’ve decided to move forward in trying the keto diet, you will want to stick to the parameters of the eating plan. Roughly 60 to 80 percent of your calories will come from fats. That means you’ll eat meats, fats, and oils, and a very limited amount of nonstarchy vegetables, she says. (This is different from a traditional low-carb diet, as even fewer carbs are allowed on the keto diet.)
The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]

^ Ketogenic "eggnog" is used during induction and is a drink with the required ketogenic ratio. For example, a 4:1 ratio eggnog would contain 60 g of 36% heavy whipping cream, 25 g pasteurised raw egg, saccharin and vanilla flavour. This contains 245 kcal (1,025 kJ), 4 g protein, 2 g carbohydrate and 24 g fat (24:6 = 4:1).[17] The eggnog may also be cooked to make a custard, or frozen to make ice cream.[37]
I had pasta last night, and I feel guilty that I cheated. This recipe is that good. I followed your directions exactly, including simmering the noodles in some sauce for a few minutes. What size pan did you use? It was hard for me to estimate and I ended up throwing away some egg mixture. Putting pan sizes in all your wonderful recipes would be helpful. Keep up the good work. You are my low-carb, go-to guru.
You’re transitioning. Your body is equipped to process a high intake of carbs and a lower intake of fat. Your body needs to create enzymes to be able to do this. In the transitional period, the brain may run low on energy which can lead to grogginess, nausea, and headaches. If you’re having a large problem with this, you can choose to reduce carb intake gradually.
The keto diet (also known as ketogenic diet, low carb diet and LCHF diet) is a low carbohydrate, high fat diet. Maintaining this diet is a great tool for weight loss. More importantly though, according to an increasing number of studies, it helps reduce risk factors for diabetes, heart diseases, stroke, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, and more1-6.On the keto diet, your body enters a metabolic state called ketosis. While in ketosis your body is using ketone bodies for energy instead of glucose. Ketone bodies are derived from fat and are a much more stable, steady source of energy than glucose, which is derived from carbohydrates.
Goday A, Bellido D, Sajoux I, Crujeiras AB, Burguera B, García-Luna PP, Oleaga A, Moreno B, Casanueva FF. Short-term safety, tolerability and efficacy of a very low-calorie-ketogenic diet interventional weight loss program versus hypocaloric diet in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Nutr Diabetes. 2016 Sep 19;6(9):e230. [PMC free article: PMC5048014] [PubMed: 27643725] 
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