A: The amount of weight you lose is entirely dependent on you. Obviously adding exercise to your regimen will speed up your weight loss. Cutting out things that are common “stall” causes is also a good thing. Artificial sweeteners, dairy, wheat products and by-products (wheat gluten, wheat flours, and anything with an identifiable wheat product in it).
A well-formulated ketogenic diet, besides limiting carbohydrates, also limits protein intake moderately to less than 1g/lb body weight, unless individuals are performing heavy exercise involving weight training when the protein intake can be increased to 1.5g/lb body weight. This is to prevent the endogenous production of glucose in the body via gluconeogenesis. However, it does not restrict fat or overall daily calories. People on a ketogenic diet initially experience rapid weight loss up to 10 lbs in 2 weeks or less. This diet has a diuretic effect, and some early weight loss is due to water weight loss followed by a fat loss. Interestingly with this diet plan, lean body muscle is largely spared. As a nutritional ketosis state sustains, hunger pangs subside, and an overall reduction in caloric intake helps to further weight loss.

Carbs in fruits and veggies do count, but you don’t add up the carbs and sugar. Sugar is already included in the carbs – it’s just listed separately on labels because some people want to see a breakdown of how much of the carbs are sugars (versus other, complex carbs). If it says 2g carbs and 2g sugar, it means there is 2g total carbs and all of them are sugar (in this case).


Hi Joellen, It doesn’t rise as much as a wheat bread but does a little. The almond flour being frozen might have made it worse, I’m not sure – I don’t store mine there since I go through it a lot. I’m glad you like the texture. If you want a taller loaf, you can multiply the recipe by 1.5 or even double it, but would need to increase the cook time and probably cover it to prevent browning the top too much before the middle is done.
Hi Jan, Sorry they didn’t work for you. It’s hard to say what happened without being in the kitchen with you. Did you use exactly the same ingredients and amounts? Also, if they were not cooked, then they probably needed to be in the oven for longer. If they were clumpy, it’s also possible that the almond flour wasn’t fine blanched (it needs to be) or the batter wasn’t mixed well enough. Hope this helps.
Love your blog and recipes, thank you! Congratulations on doing keto – I’ve been sugar, dairy, grain and pretty much all carb free for over a year keeping my carbs to under 30 grams per day. My question is about coffee…did you give it up? I was drinking way too much coffee with heavy cream so I finally gave that up for Califia almond/coconut creamer sugar free of course! Did you give up coffee during the keto trial?
You may be surprised with this recipe that you are instructed to soak the nuts for a few hours before making the cereal, but this is to increase the nutrients in the nuts and get rid of any nasties. If you store this in individual jars in the fridge, you can make a week’s supply of this cereal at a time then just grab one in the morning to get you off to a great start.
I made this today and the flavor is outstanding! My only thing about it I’m not completely thrilled with is the lack of clumps of nuts and seeds. I put some pecan pieces in hoping they would form some clumps with the nuts, but it didn’t really help. I’m wondering if a thicker liquid would make a difference. Perhaps Sukrin gold syrup instead of coconut oil and sweetener? Could maybe add some maple flavoring to it. You might not be able to find Sukrin in the UK, but it is accessible through Amazon. Would maybe some of your followers from the US have an opinion about this?
Dr. Perlmutter is the leading integrative medicine neurologist in North America today. His ability to fully integrate conventional medicine diagnosis and treatment with the latest innovations in nutritional and environmental medicine is phenomenal. As a teacher and clinician, he has fundamentally changed how physicians and patients think about neurological degeneration and, happily, regeneration.
In relation to overall caloric intake, carbohydrates comprise around 55% of the typical American diet, ranging from 200 to 350 g/day. The vast potential of refined carbohydrates to cause harmful effects were relatively neglected until recently. A greater intake of sugar-laden food is associated with a 44% increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity and a 26% increase in the risk of developing diabetes mellitus. In a 2012 study of all cardiometabolic deaths (heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes) in the United States, an estimated 45.4% were associated with suboptimal intakes of 10 dietary factors. The largest estimated mortality was associated with high sodium intake (9.5%), followed by low intake of nuts and seeds (8.5%), high intake of processed meats (8.2%), low intake of omega-3 fats (7.8%), low intake of vegetables 7.6%), low intake of fruits (7.5%), and high intake of artificially sweetened beverages (7.4%). The lowest estimated mortality was associated with low polyunsaturated fats (2.3%) and unprocessed red meats (0.4%). In addition to this direct harm, excess consumption of low-quality carbohydrates may displace and leave no room in the diet for healthier foods like nuts, unprocessed grains,  fruits, and vegetables.
By the way, I love how simple this recipe is! I love that it uses whole eggs instead of separated since I’m really bad at separating the yolks from the whites, and if you use more whites than yolks then you have to find another use for the yolks and it’s a pain in the neck. I went keto on summer last year and when I decided to start baking my own bread and went looking for almond flour bread recipes, I chose this one for its simplicity
The American Heart Association recommends eating six to eight servings of grains every day, which is a lot of carbohydrates. But whole grains also contain a lot of fiber, which is the basis for the recommendation. Fiber is bulky and slow to digest, so you feel full longer after a high-fiber meal. Fiber also aids in healthy elimination, which can keep you feeling – and looking – less bloated and sluggish. People who eat a high-fiber diet are at a lower risk for heart disease, strokes and certain types of cancers because fiber helps you avoid the insulin spikes that occur when you eat starchy carbs. Fiber also helps control your cholesterol levels. 

So rather than giving one-size-fits-all dietary advice or weaponizing the word “balanced” it might be better if the medical community suggested that there are Individual differences that need to be considered. This might also help those lay folk who have had success with one dietary lifestyle or another also realize that what’s valid for them may not be good advice for others.


FRUITS: Don't choose fruit juices—you're just paying someone to take the fiber out of your food. Instead, eat the fruit itself, and get 3.1 grams of fiber. You can get a serious fiber bang for your carb buck with berries (a half cup of raspberries adds 4 fiber grams, blackberries add 3.8 and blueberries or strawberries add 1.7) and kiwis (2.7 grams per fruit). Always accompany fruit with protein and/or fat such as nuts or cheese to slow any negative impact of the natural sugars on blood-sugar levels.
We know from our research in blue zones longevity hotspots that the longest-lived people in the world eat a whole food, plant-slant diet that is highlighted with whole grains, beans, nuts, and leafy greens. Their diet is 90-95 percent plant-based and oftentimes about 50-65 percent of their daily caloric intake comes from carbohydrates. These are not highly processed carbohydrates like white bread or sugary drinks, but whole foods like sweet potatoes, beans, whole grains, and fruits and vegetables.
You may be surprised with this recipe that you are instructed to soak the nuts for a few hours before making the cereal, but this is to increase the nutrients in the nuts and get rid of any nasties. If you store this in individual jars in the fridge, you can make a week’s supply of this cereal at a time then just grab one in the morning to get you off to a great start.
This keto granola can be made in big batches and stored for use during the week, but it takes just a couple of minutes to throw it together so can be made fresh each morning. This makes a perfect energy-rich start to the day if you are no-sugar, and the slow release of energy will boost your system till lunch. Serve with nut milk of your choice – almond milk or coconut milk work well here.
Cereal is a tough one to give up when starting a low carb, grain-free or paleo diet. It’s easy to make, it’s tasty and it fills you up. For a little bit, anyway, before the subsequent blood sugar crash. But it turns out that you don’t have to give it up at all, as long as you are willing to make your own. And many of these low carb cereal recipes are almost as easy to make as grabbing the box from your cupboard and pouring cereal into your bowl. From granola to squares to hot cereals for a cold winter morning, we’ve got you covered.
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