These tasted amazing. But my donuts did not keep its shape. I used the exact ingredients. My batter turned out very wet for a baking recipe. Maybe add a bit more almond flour to get a thicker consistency? My donuts stuck to the pan pretty bad so I’ll have to grease the pan even more. I’m planning to try this recipe again next week and hoping it turns out well because I wanna add blueberries! This is the best low carb doughnut recipe I’ve found!
I have several health challenges and the latest was the need to be on a gluten free diet. At first I thought it wouldn’t be too bad as I had seen many products in the store to help me. Then…I started tasting them. Can I say cardboard might have more flavor and texture?!? Oh my, what an adventure…lol! Then I found you and your amazing recipes! It is very apparent the time, dedication and love you put into making each recipe taste perfect.
Because I don’t think it does work as well. If you use it that way and you like it great but I can’t recommend it because I didn’t like the texture the times that I tried it in this recipe. Each recipe is tested several times… usually by several people… and this one everyone who tried it liked the original better than the xanthan gum. SO… now you know why I keep saying there’s no substitute. 🙂
Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.

The popular low-carb diets (such as Atkins or Paleo) modify a true keto diet. But they come with the same risks if you overdo it on fats and proteins and lay off the carbs. So why do people follow the diets? "They're everywhere, and people hear anecdotally that they work," McManus says. Theories about short-term low-carb diet success include lower appetite because fat burns slower than carbs. "But again, we don't know about the long term," she says. "And eating a restrictive diet, no matter what the plan, is difficult to sustain. Once you resume a normal diet, the weight will likely return."
Hi Barb, That can definitely be it. Losing when you are close to goal can be more difficult. It could also be that your body’s healthy weight is a little higher than what you’d like – which doesn’t mean you can’t lose, but makes it more difficult. If just eating Keto foods isn’t working, double check the macros for your weight and see if the amount you’re eating needs to be adjusted. You’ll find more help and support in our support group here.
Cereal is a tough one to give up when starting a low carb, grain-free or paleo diet. It’s easy to make, it’s tasty and it fills you up. For a little bit, anyway, before the subsequent blood sugar crash. But it turns out that you don’t have to give it up at all, as long as you are willing to make your own. And many of these low carb cereal recipes are almost as easy to make as grabbing the box from your cupboard and pouring cereal into your bowl. From granola to squares to hot cereals for a cold winter morning, we’ve got you covered.
If you are a coconut lover you will really love this hot cereal in the morning. This is one of the best breakfast cereals you can have, especially on a colder day, as it gets you filled up and heated up at the same time. It has a rich coconut flavor which is complemented by the vanilla and is sweet enough to satisfy a sweet tooth, and with only two grams of carbs in each serving, it is definitely low.

On a ketogenic diet, your entire body switches its fuel supply to run mostly on fat, burning fat 24-7. When insulin levels become very low, fat burning can increase dramatically. It becomes easier to access your fat stores to burn them off. This is great if you’re trying to lose weight, but there are also other less obvious benefits, such as less hunger and a steady supply of energy. This may help keep you alert and focused.


I don’t make pancakes often and never waffles, but I have definitely used it for the crepes A LOT. The key to the crepes is that the liquid is super thin–like cake mix, not like brownie mix. The xantham gum is really not a huge amount for the full recipe. It is under 1 TBSP per cup of other dry ingredients. Let me know if you like it better with the wheat gluten. Thanks for writing!
Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.

This keto granola can be made in big batches and stored for use during the week, but it takes just a couple of minutes to throw it together so can be made fresh each morning. This makes a perfect energy-rich start to the day if you are no-sugar, and the slow release of energy will boost your system till lunch. Serve with nut milk of your choice – almond milk or coconut milk work well here.

Weight loss is a common target for disease management, as well as health promotion. The prevalence of obesity remains high among U.S. adults (36.5%) (5), as well as children and adolescents (17%) (6). Importantly, obesity is a significant contributor to increased morbidity and mortality, as well as being a primary driver of increasing medical expenses (4). Despite much effort and cost, there has been little success on this front and obesity remains a public health crisis.


I do not use the VLC mix to make yeast breads. I have recipes at the blog for cookies, cupcakes, biscuits, and crepes using this mix. I have dozens of recipes in various stages of testing that use this mix. Some of my favorites are quick breads and muffins and cookies. Cake type recipes (muffins, small loaves of bread, cupcakes, cake, etc.) really turn out well with this mix. Let me know how some other dishes turn out for you! Thanks!

The first modern study of fasting as a treatment for epilepsy was in France in 1911.[12] Twenty epilepsy patients of all ages were "detoxified" by consuming a low-calorie vegetarian diet, combined with periods of fasting and purging. Two benefited enormously, but most failed to maintain compliance with the imposed restrictions. The diet improved the patients' mental capabilities, in contrast to their medication, potassium bromide, which dulled the mind.[13]


As ingested CHO is broken down by the stomach and absorbed through the small intestine, rising blood sugar creates a feedback loop which results in secretion of insulin. The primary role of insulin is to “dispose” of excess blood sugar by signaling tissues to “uptake” more glucose from the circulating supply. In this manner insulin serves a prominent role in glucose regulation. This concept also provides the basis for the glycemic index, a concept which attempts to quantify the impact CHO foods have on blood sugar response. For example, foods rich in simple CHO (i.e., “sugars”), which are absorbed quickly, trigger a rapid rise in blood sugar (and subsequently insulin response), whereas foods rich in complex CHO, such as fiber-rich legumes, exert a relatively blunted response on blood glucose.
Carbohydrates are a good source of quick energy to fuel your body's natural functions and keep you going during busy days. They have gotten a bad reputation in the fitness and weight-loss worlds, though, because many typical carbs that people take in are starchy, sugary, salty and contain no useful nutrition. Choose the right kind of low-carb cereal and you can enjoy a quick and convenient breakfast or snack entirely guilt-free.
Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.
One of the easiest traps to fall into when starting a ketogenic diet is the assumption that all fats are healthy. It is not uncommon to see new adherents loading up their plates with industrially harvested bacon, exclaiming, “I’m keto, so it’s healthy!” In reality, because ketosis repositions ketones as your primary fuel source, ensuring you consume healthy fats becomes even more important on the ketogenic diet.
In fact, once all our our reserved glucose/glycogen runs out after several days on a low-carb, keto diet, our bodies create compounds called ketone bodies (or ketones) from our own stored body fat, as well as from fats in our diet. In addition, researchers have discovered that ketones contain main benefits, such as fat loss, suppressing our appetites, boosting mental clarity and lowering the risk for a number of chronic diseases.
Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders after stroke,[7] and affects around 50 million people worldwide.[8] It is diagnosed in a person having recurrent, unprovoked seizures. These occur when cortical neurons fire excessively, hypersynchronously, or both, leading to temporary disruption of normal brain function. This might affect, for example, the muscles, the senses, consciousness, or a combination. A seizure can be focal (confined to one part of the brain) or generalised (spread widely throughout the brain and leading to a loss of consciousness). Epilepsy can occur for a variety of reasons; some forms have been classified into epileptic syndromes, most of which begin in childhood. Epilepsy is considered refractory (not yielding to treatment) when two or three anticonvulsant drugs have failed to control it. About 60% of patients achieve control of their epilepsy with the first drug they use, whereas around 30% do not achieve control with drugs. When drugs fail, other options include epilepsy surgery, vagus nerve stimulation, and the ketogenic diet.[7]
Thanks for posting about the psyllium Sarah,, I tried psyllium flakes 10g and they turned out great. Not even very fragile. It just gets thick so the batter doesn’t self-level, I had to do my best, and the thick spots required 1 extra minute in the oven. Used immediately in a skillet lasagne- just ground beef, jar of pasta sauce, mozz cheese and cream cheese. Definitely wouldn’t have been much of a lasagne without the “pasta”! So these noodles are my hero 🙂
Digestible carbs are also sometimes called “net carbs” but be very careful of this term on labels of low-carb products, processed foods, protein bars and energy/chocolate bars. Manufacturers often use “net carbs” as a way to disguise sugar alcohols that may slow weight loss and impact blood sugar. In fact, try to avoid any processed product that list “net carbs” on a label. Learn more about keto sweeteners
I really appreciate this article. I have done low Carb for the most part for over 15 years and was able to keep my weight down. Now that I have gone through menopause is just keeps getting harder. I try doing keto but tend to fall off the wagon a lot and go back to low Carb or Weight Watchers. Simple ideas would be great. I think some keto bloggers make it seem that you have to create difficult recipes. Thanks for all you do.
Since the ingredients are eggs and cream cheese, and the recipe for scrambled eggs or an omelette is eggs and cream or milk, which is almost the same, the taste is going to be eggy. Adding gluten,which has no taste, is not going to change the flavor. I thought it might change the texture, but it didn’t do that either. How it’s mixed, baked, or simmered isn’t going to change the flavor either.
The goal of the KD is to sufficiently deprive the body of CHO to achieve physiological or “nutritional ketosis,” a metabolic state which is characterized by blood ketone levels between 0.5 and 3.0 mmol/L (26). This “switch over” point, however, is not seamless and may take up to several weeks for individuals to become “keto adapted” (18). Supporting this idea is a significant amount evidence indicating that a “keto adapted” body has little reliance on glucose for CNS function (8,14,16) or as a source of energy for exercise (17,18,25,27).
Here is another grain free porridge that can be ready to eat in a short time, but gives you all the goodness you need first thing. This keto porridge has an almost wheat-like flavor and can be topped with whatever ingredients you like. You can even add seasonings like cinnamon to vary the flavor even more, then sit back and enjoy a warming plate of creamy goodness!
Several recent studies indicate that a low-carbohydrate diet is effective at improving glycemia. A few studies have shown that in non-diabetic individuals, low-carbohydrate diets were more effective than higher carbohydrate diets at improving fasting serum glucose [13,14] and insulin [6,14-16], and at improving insulin sensitivity as measured by the homeostasis model [6]. One of these studies also included diabetic patients and noted a comparative improvement in hemoglobin A1c after 6 months (low fat diet: 0.0 ± 1.0%; low carbohydrate diet: -0.6 ± 1.2%, p = 0.06) [6] and 12 months (low fat diet: -0.1 ± 1.6%; low carbohydrate diet: -0.7 ± 1.0%, p = 0.019) duration [5]. In a 5-week crossover feeding study, 8 men with type 2 diabetes had greater improvement in fasting glucose, 24-hour glucose area-under-the-curve (AUC), 24-hour insulin AUC, and glycohemoglobin while on the low-carbohydrate diet than when on a eucaloric low-fat diet [7]. In a 14-day inpatient feeding study, 10 participants with type 2 diabetes experienced improvements in hemoglobin A1c and insulin sensitivity as measured by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp method [8]. Hemoglobin A1c also improved in an outpatient study of 16 participants who followed a 20% carbohydrate diet for 24 weeks [9].
Around this time, Bernarr Macfadden, an American exponent of physical culture, popularised the use of fasting to restore health. His disciple, the osteopathic physician Dr. Hugh William Conklin of Battle Creek, Michigan, began to treat his epilepsy patients by recommending fasting. Conklin conjectured that epileptic seizures were caused when a toxin, secreted from the Peyer's patches in the intestines, was discharged into the bloodstream. He recommended a fast lasting 18 to 25 days to allow this toxin to dissipate. Conklin probably treated hundreds of epilepsy patients with his "water diet" and boasted of a 90% cure rate in children, falling to 50% in adults. Later analysis of Conklin's case records showed 20% of his patients achieved freedom from seizures and 50% had some improvement.[10]
Taken together, these results demonstrate a positive effect of LCD/KD on body composition. While KD may not be superior to other dietary strategies aimed at weight reduction, the evidence does suggest that it may be equally effective. Nevertheless, the International Society of Sports Nutritionists, in their Position Stand on the effects of diets on body composition, suggest the KD holds little benefit over higher CHO diets, with one notable exception; KD may enhance appetite control (1). 
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