A well-formulated ketogenic diet, besides limiting carbohydrates, also limits protein intake moderately to less than 1g/lb body weight, unless individuals are performing heavy exercise involving weight training when the protein intake can be increased to 1.5g/lb body weight. This is to prevent the endogenous production of glucose in the body via gluconeogenesis. However, it does not restrict fat or overall daily calories. People on a ketogenic diet initially experience rapid weight loss up to 10 lbs in 2 weeks or less. This diet has a diuretic effect, and some early weight loss is due to water weight loss followed by a fat loss. Interestingly with this diet plan, lean body muscle is largely spared. As a nutritional ketosis state sustains, hunger pangs subside, and an overall reduction in caloric intake helps to further weight loss.
If no food processor is at hand, you can also do it by hand (it just takes a little more time and arm muscle!). Add all the dry ingredients to a large bowl and whisk until thoroughly combined. Pour in vinegar and whisk until thoroughly distributed. Pour in egg while whisking vigorously and keep whisking until the dough becomes too stiff to whisk. Using your hands, knead the dough until thoroughly incorporated, adding a teaspoon of water at a time as needed (we use 2). 
FRUITS: Don't choose fruit juices—you're just paying someone to take the fiber out of your food. Instead, eat the fruit itself, and get 3.1 grams of fiber. You can get a serious fiber bang for your carb buck with berries (a half cup of raspberries adds 4 fiber grams, blackberries add 3.8 and blueberries or strawberries add 1.7) and kiwis (2.7 grams per fruit). Always accompany fruit with protein and/or fat such as nuts or cheese to slow any negative impact of the natural sugars on blood-sugar levels.
Soba noodles: In many Japanese dishes, fiber-rich soba noodles are the star player. While they’re similar in texture to traditional long noodles, their nutty flavor makes them a great fit for savory and slightly sweeter dishes. At 24g of carbs per cup, they’re a higher-carb option than veggies, but still lower in carbs than a cup of regular spaghetti which has around 43g of carbs.

The trick to working with coconut flour is accepting the fact that it requires a lot of eggs to give it structure and a decent consistency. It can be a little shocking to see half a dozen to a dozen eggs in a recipe, but as you try it out, you will see that it works. The end results are rarely too eggy or rubbery. You will also be surprised to see how little coconut flour is used in most recipes. It’s incredibly dense, but expands remarkably with the added eggs and liquid, so you typically only need about a third of the amount you would need with conventional flour or nut flours.
Thanks for your quick reply. Yes, BP is fresh. My batter wasn’t runny either. In fact I was going to add some more liquid but decided to leave as it was. The only other thing it could have been is that I live at 5100′ elevation and it was cold and snowing the day I made them. I am going to make them again and see what happens. I am not giving up! 🙂
This is REALLY good. My OH also thought that this was ‘proper’ bread LOL! Why do people think that anything not made with wheat is not ‘proper’? I guess they don’t have a gluten intolerance. This really is the best low carb GF bread I’ve tasted in a LONG while. It will become a staple in this household that’s for sure. Will definitely still use the 90 second rolls as well for convenience!
In trying to decrease carbs I have tried a few recipes for baked goods but they’re a bit “off”. One was a brownie recipe using coconut flour, avocados & sweet potatoes. It tasted pretty good but the texture was almost custard like. Would have allowing it to rest & thicken before baking have helped? I wondered about using psyllium husk to thicken or make it more dense. Maybe 3 instead of 4 eggs?? The other recipe was a traditional scone recipe that I adjusted. I used half wheat flour and almond flour. They tasted fantastic but were just a bit too moist and didnt rise as typical which I expected from the reading I did beforehand. Do you have advise on leavening agents? I found “use a little bit more” in a recipe where almond flour is substituted but there was no percentage or specifics on how much “a little bit more” meant… My brain is swirling in trouble-shooting overload!
At 60 minutes, the bread showed as done with a toothpick. Removed it from the oven and it sank down the center. I waited 15 minutes. Cut a piece off and it was wet, like not done in the center. I baked it 15 more min and it stayed the same. Is it supposed to be wet/moist like, maybe it’s oily from the coconut oil? If it’s supposed to be completely dry but moist, not wet, then something went wrong.
Participants were recruited from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) outpatient clinics. Inclusion criteria were age 35–75 years; body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2; and fasting serum glucose >125 mg/dL or hemoglobin A1c >6.5% without medications, or treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) and/or insulin. Exclusion criteria were evidence of renal insufficiency, liver disease, or unstable cardiovascular disease by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. All participants provided written informed consent approved by the institutional review board. No monetary incentives were provided.

I’m trying your recipe for the first time. It is very similar to a bun recipe that I make with psyllium husks so I am incorporating the method from that into this recipe. I made a few slight changes… I added garlic powder ground Rosemary and oregano, one quarter cup ground flaxseed, one tablespoon apple cider vinegar. I only used 3 eggs, and increased the Water by 2 tablespoons. By adding apple cider vinegar and the baking soda, they create a very light effervescent foam as they interactwhen I add the warm water, which acts naturally to the raise the bread, thereby allowing me to decrease the eggs. I added the extra water due to the extra dry ingredients. I’m very confident that this will work out very well. It always works with my buns so I’m eager to test this out. Thank you again for the base recipe.
Cereal is a tough one to give up when starting a low carb, grain-free or paleo diet. It’s easy to make, it’s tasty and it fills you up. For a little bit, anyway, before the subsequent blood sugar crash. But it turns out that you don’t have to give it up at all, as long as you are willing to make your own. And many of these low carb cereal recipes are almost as easy to make as grabbing the box from your cupboard and pouring cereal into your bowl. From granola to squares to hot cereals for a cold winter morning, we’ve got you covered.
×