Hi, I’m still a bit skeptical, I have seen some of my friends do the keto diet, and have had good results. Though I am still not sure about the idea of the fats being eaten. They say they eat meat with the fat and must do so, is this correct? Also isn’t this not good for the body especially for the kidneys? Second, can a diabetic do this diet? There are many questions running through my head.
The central aim of the ketogenic diet is to push the body into a state of ketosis, where metabolism shifts from burning carbohydrates as the primary energy source to fat, or “ketone bodies.” These ketones are a special type of fat that serve as cellular “superfuel.” In order to achieve ketosis, one must consume a diet high in healthy fats and dramatically lower in sugar and carbohydrates. This allows blood sugar to drop to the point that glucose is significantly less available to the body to burn as a source of fuel. In the absence of glucose, the body shifts its focus to ketones for energy production. Ketosis not only burns fat—which supports weight loss and BMI reduction if in a calorie deficit—it also transitions the body’s energy source to what clearly turns out to be a better fuel. In fact, energy derived from burning fat is associated with a remarkable reduction in the amount of damaging free radicals in the body, in comparison to burning sugar.

We have solid evidence showing that a ketogenic diet reduces seizures in children, sometimes as effectively as medication. Because of these neuroprotective effects, questions have been raised about the possible benefits for other brain disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, sleep disorders, autism, and even brain cancer. However, there are no human studies to support recommending ketosis to treat these conditions.
I make this recipe ALL the time. It’s so good and I’m always bummed out when run out of it. Luckily it is so quick and easy to make. It’s a great low carb cereal and I always double or triple the recipe. (Note…I use half the butter per batch and just mix it longer in my food processor until it all comes together and it comes out perfect every time.)
Over the long-term the KD poses possible risks as well, although the evidence remains unclear on this topic. Consumption of a high fat diet, particularly saturated fat, is associated with increased cardiovascular risk (23) and consumption of saturated fat has been shown to acutely induce insulin resistance and raise blood triglyceride levels (12). Nevertheless, many KD studies have documented improvements in markers of cardiovascular risk, including improvements in vascular function (24) reduction in inflammatory markers (10), and other markers of cardiovascular health (13,20). Methodological issues, such as clear definitions of dietary interventions, may play a significant role in obscuring the underlying principles, however, it is clear that more targeted research is warranted.

Dr. Campos, it is unfortunate that you retain the medical community’s negative stance on the ketogenic diet, probably picked up in medical school when you studied ketoacidosis, in the midst of an obesity and type II diabetes epidemic that is growing every year, especially among populations who will never see the Harvard Health Letter. The medical community has failed in reversing this trend, especially among children, and the public is picking up the tab, in the form of higher health insurance premiums to treat chronic metabolic diseases which doctors cannot cure. The ketogenic diet does not bid its adherents to eat unhealthy processed meats, and the green leafy vegetables that it emphasizes are important in a number of nutritional deficiencies. People lose weight on the ketogenic diet, they lose their craving for sugar, they feel more satiety, they may become less depressed, their insulin receptors sensitivity is improved, and these are all the good outcomes you fail to mention. There is a growing body of research which demonstrates the neuroprotective effects of the ketogenic diet to slow cancer progression, as well as diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, for which there are no effective medical treatments. Please respect your patients by providing them with evidence-based medical outcomes, not opinions.

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is a ketogenic diet safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss.


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Almond flour is a great low carb pasta alternative. It contains 1.6 grams of carbohydrates and 1.6 grams of dietary fiber, resulting in zero net carbs[*]. White, bleached, enriched flour contains over 76 grams of total carbohydrates with only 2 grams of fiber[*]. Almonds are also an excellent source of healthy fats, vitamin E, manganese and magnesium[*].

Normal dietary fat contains mostly long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are more ketogenic than LCTs because they generate more ketones per unit of energy when metabolised. Their use allows for a diet with a lower proportion of fat and a greater proportion of protein and carbohydrate,[18] leading to more food choices and larger portion sizes.[4] The original MCT diet developed by Peter Huttenlocher in the 1970s derived 60% of its calories from MCT oil.[15] Consuming that quantity of MCT oil caused abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting in some children. A figure of 45% is regarded as a balance between achieving good ketosis and minimising gastrointestinal complaints. The classical and modified MCT ketogenic diets are equally effective and differences in tolerability are not statistically significant.[9] The MCT diet is less popular in the United States; MCT oil is more expensive than other dietary fats and is not covered by insurance companies.[18]


Disclaimer: Nothing contained on this Site is intended to provide health care advice. Should you have any health care-related questions, please call or see your physician or other health care provider. Consult your physician or health care provider before beginning the Atkins Diet as you would any other weight loss or weight maintenance program. The weight loss phases of the Atkins Diet should not be used by persons on dialysis. Individual results may vary.
Children who discontinue the diet after achieving seizure freedom have about a 20% risk of seizures returning. The length of time until recurrence is highly variable, but averages two years. This risk of recurrence compares with 10% for resective surgery (where part of the brain is removed) and 30–50% for anticonvulsant therapy. Of those who have a recurrence, just over half can regain freedom from seizures either with anticonvulsants or by returning to the ketogenic diet. Recurrence is more likely if, despite seizure freedom, an electroencephalogram shows epileptiform spikes, which indicate epileptic activity in the brain but are below the level that will cause a seizure. Recurrence is also likely if an MRI scan shows focal abnormalities (for example, as in children with tuberous sclerosis). Such children may remain on the diet longer than average, and children with tuberous sclerosis who achieve seizure freedom could remain on the ketogenic diet indefinitely.[46]
You can make “quick breads”–or non-yeast breads with it. It does not have enough gluten to make dough rise well. If you see a bread that calls for almond flour or coconut flour (to a certain extent–coconut flour usually requires more eggs), you can often substitute this mix for a lower fat, lower calorie, more diverse-tasting flour. If you are after yeast products, I recommend my Low Carb Sprouted Flour Mix. (Bread and yeast product recipes for that mix are coming soon!)

If you are like me you were brought up eating sugary cereals like frosted flakes and if the truth were told I do miss them! However now that we are eating keto they just don’t figure anymore, so this low carb recipe has been great to find. You are using coconut flakes and sweetening them, so you still have the sweet taste and crunchy texture that we all remember!
Almond flour recipes typically require more eggs and more leavening agent to help them rise properly. I also like to add a little dry protein, like whey protein powder, as I find this can help [with rising?].  Almond flour recipes may also contain less oil and liquid as well, to account for the high fat content of the nuts. In my experience, low carb, gluten-free batters are thicker than their conventional counterparts. Resist the urge to thin them out, as you may end up with a soggy mess.
I am thankful for you and for Maria Emmerich as well. Your biscotti recipe and a few others make my low carb life possible and enjoyable. Maria E’s bread with psyllium recipe is another that keeps me happy and healthy. Thank you both. My life is revolutionized in these past 2 years and I couldn’t have sustained low carb eating without you. Your almond tea cake recipe was my first venture into almond flour and erythritol, etc—low carb cooking and eating would just be too drab and boring for me without your recipes.
Look, the good doctor is right – he only forgot to stress “portion control” which is why many fanatical dieters are so kee-jerk reactive to any discussion – odds are you over ate like a hog before your keto diet, and are weak and insecure in your diet plans. Eat EVERYTHING in small amounts, and you will live long and prosper. The only thing to avoid are processed foods. Cook your meals from scratch using quality ingredients.
2. Raygan, F., Bahmani, F., Kouchaki, E., Aghadavod, E., Sharifi, S., Akbari, E., . . . Asemi, Z. (2016). Comparative effects of carbohydrate versus fat restriction on metabolic profiles, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight patients with Type 2 diabetic and coronary heart disease: A randomized clinical trial. PMID: 28607566 

When it comes to low carb breakfasts, it's easy to go the route of bacon and eggs. We all do it and it works great. It's filling, delicious and basically no carbs. But, some of us can get bored of that and want to change it up and that's where low carb cereals come into play. Now, I've tried many low carb cereals from Amazon and there are a few options, but they just aren't low carb enough. We wanted to change that, because as I've mentioned, cereal is my ultimate food. We even have a couple others recipes that utilize more than just the standard bacon and eggs. Give our Keto Oatmeal and Keto Macro Cakes a try!
Hi Tanisha, Sunflower seed flour should work in the same quantity (you can buy it here). I haven’t tried it for this recipe, but it does often work as a good almond flour replacement. The only thing to keep in mind is that the bread may come out green in color – sunflower seed flour tends to do this when baked – but it doesn’t affect the taste. Let me know how it goes if you try it!
Hi Kelly, All packaged foods will have a nutrition label that list the macros per serving, including fat, protein and cabrohydrates. Net carbs, which is what most people look at for low carb and keto, are total carbs (the amount on the label) minus fiber and sugar alcohols, as explained in the article above. I have a low carb food list here that gives you a full list of all the foods you can eat, and the net carbs in each. You can also sign up above to be notified about the meal plans, which are a great way to get started.
I know I know, you’re reading the directions and you’re annoyed that you have to cut each and every ¾ inch square out and transfer it to a pan because WHO HAS TIME FOR THAT. But I am here to tell you that YOU HAVE TIME FOR IT because the end result is cereal that fancy-person-you made yourself, which is going to make you feel very elite and accomplished because WHO DOES THAT?

I subbed the almond flour out with homemade sunflower seed flour as I am intolerant of almonds. I also copied someone’s idea from watching a youtube video to make it more bread tasting (and smelling) and added one package of Fleischman’s Fast Active Dry Yeast and a 1/2 teaspoon sugar (which the sugar is all consumed by the yeast and helps it rise). I put in 2 whole eggs and 3 egg whites.


A ketogenic diet also has been shown to improve blood sugar control for patients with type 2 diabetes, at least in the short term. There is even more controversy when we consider the effect on cholesterol levels. A few studies show some patients have increase in cholesterol levels in the beginning, only to see cholesterol fall a few months later. However, there is no long-term research analyzing its effects over time on diabetes and high cholesterol.
A Cochrane systematic review in 2018 found and analysed eleven randomized controlled trials of ketogenic diet in people with epilepsy for whom drugs failed to control their seizures.[2] Six of the trials compared a group assigned to a ketogenic diet with a group not assigned to one. The other trials compared types of diets or ways of introducing them to make them more tolerable.[2] In the largest trial of the ketogenic diet with a non-diet control[16], nearly 38% of the children and young people had half or fewer seizures with the diet compared 6% with the group not assigned to the diet. Two large trials of the Modified Atkins Diet compared to a non-diet control had similar results, with over 50% of children having half or fewer seizures with the diet compared to around 10% in the control group.[2]

It's worth noting that many low-carb diets vary in their intake requirements. For instance, the Atkins diet recommends eating less than 100 grams of carbs a day, while the Mayo Clinic points out that any diet is considered low in carbs if it falls under the Dietary Guidelines for Americans' recommendation to consume 900 to 1300 calories of carbohydrates per day (or 45% to 65% of your total calories, based on a 2000 calorie diet).
So, recently when I was craving Monterey Chicken and didn’t have time to wait for the chicken to cook in the crockpot, I made a low carb skillet version that turned out just like the one I remembered. It was extremely flavorful and delicious! All in all, it took about 25 minutes from start to finish since I had already cooked the bacon earlier in the day and my homemade low carb sugar-free BBQ sauce was already in the fridge.
At Diet Doctor, we believe many people may do best starting out on a strict keto diet. This will give you the best idea of whether you like how you feel, how it impacts you and what sort of results you get. Then, as you hopefully achieve your health and weight goals, you can decide whether to add more carbs back into your diet to a level where you feel your best and can maintain your health goals.
Our bodies are incredibly adaptive to what you put into it – when you overload it with fats and take away carbohydrates, it will begin to burn ketones as the primary energy source. Optimal ketone levels offer many health, weight loss, physical and mental performance benefits.1There are scientifically-backed studies that show the advantage of a low-carb, ketogenic diet over a low-fat diet. One meta-analysis of low-carbohydrate diets showed a large advantage in weight loss. The New England Journal of Medicine study resulted in almost double the weight loss in a long-term study on ketone inducing diets.
So let’s talk about vital wheat gluten. Yes, it is wheat, and yes in high amounts it has carbs – although not as many as flour. In this tiny amount it adds no carbs to the recipe yet helps the noodles to not only hold together but also to have that tender chewy texture we all love. This should NOT be served to anyone with a gluten intolerance or allergy but it’s just fine for low carb lifestyles.
I have several health challenges and the latest was the need to be on a gluten free diet. At first I thought it wouldn’t be too bad as I had seen many products in the store to help me. Then…I started tasting them. Can I say cardboard might have more flavor and texture?!? Oh my, what an adventure…lol! Then I found you and your amazing recipes! It is very apparent the time, dedication and love you put into making each recipe taste perfect.
This is a good low carb substitute for regular flour. I made pizza dough first using my regular (almost) recipe with a little added flaxseed flour to decrease the carbs more; ugh, not good. I am not a health nut. Then I used straight Carbalose with two times as much dry yeast, a packet of stevia, salt and water. I let it proof for ab out 15 minutes then added more Carbalose until the moisture and flour combination felt right. I let it mix in my mixer a few minutes and let it sit until it bulked up by about 1/3 (Watch it carefully, after a while it deflates.). Patted it out to the thickness I wanted, topped it, and put it on a 500 degree pizza stone. Success ! Almost as good as regular flour. Simple but good. Next ... full review
Next, the noodles are tasteless, so they make a great vessel for your pasta sauces. These are 6g net carbs per serving, but the servings are huge! We generally aren’t big fans of the concept of eating less of something to make it seem lower in carbs. But, we have found that when cooked, even half of the recommended serving is pretty sizable for these noodles.
On the other hand, the types of foods you’ll avoid eating on the keto, low-carb food plan are likely the same ones you are, or previously were, accustomed to getting lots of your daily calories from before starting this way of eating. This includes items like fruit, processed foods or drinks high in sugar, those made with any grains or white/wheat flour, conventional dairy products, desserts, and many other high-carb foods (especially those that are sources of “empty calories”).
Well there are plenty low-carb bread options out there nowadays–we keep adding to this list of great low-carb breads–but what do you do about those pasta cravings? While a traditional slice of bread will pack 16 grams of carbs or more per slice, a serving of pasta is no joke! At 40+ grams of carbs for one cup of pasta, it is not easy on the blood sugar!
I have been on the Atkins diet for the past month and a half (with great results!) But, I am not too crazy about the taste of the Atkins low carb baking mix. I decided to give this one a try, and I am so glad I did! I have read thru some of the other reviews, and for the most part, it was given high marks. I'd like to add to that five star rating by saying how much easier it is to use. No clumping, no harsh after taste, and I love the whole grain flavor! The pancakes are awesome, and its good to be able to have them again! You feel satisfied on a very small amount of anything made with this product, and remain comfortably full, which helps you avoid 'picking' in between meals. Highly recommend!
A Cochrane systematic review in 2018 found and analysed eleven randomized controlled trials of ketogenic diet in people with epilepsy for whom drugs failed to control their seizures.[2] Six of the trials compared a group assigned to a ketogenic diet with a group not assigned to one. The other trials compared types of diets or ways of introducing them to make them more tolerable.[2] In the largest trial of the ketogenic diet with a non-diet control[16], nearly 38% of the children and young people had half or fewer seizures with the diet compared 6% with the group not assigned to the diet. Two large trials of the Modified Atkins Diet compared to a non-diet control had similar results, with over 50% of children having half or fewer seizures with the diet compared to around 10% in the control group.[2]
Hi! I tried this the other day and it baked up strangely. I baked it for about 63 minutes and it was nice and crusty on top. It was still a bit gummy inside so I may need to bake it longer. However, when I flipped the loaf over it was extremely concave. The only thing I did differently is use canola oil instead of coconut oil. Any suggestions? Thanks much

Hi Debbie, Whole milk yogurt (whether cow milk or goat milk) is a person choice for a keto diet. It does contain some lactose, which is a sugar, but some people evidence suggests that there may be less than the label implies due to the beneficial bacteria in the yogurt. Either way, if you include it, be sure to get the plain kind without any added sugar.


Thanks for posting about the psyllium Sarah,, I tried psyllium flakes 10g and they turned out great. Not even very fragile. It just gets thick so the batter doesn’t self-level, I had to do my best, and the thick spots required 1 extra minute in the oven. Used immediately in a skillet lasagne- just ground beef, jar of pasta sauce, mozz cheese and cream cheese. Definitely wouldn’t have been much of a lasagne without the “pasta”! So these noodles are my hero 🙂
Instead of getting that store-bought can of frosting that’s filled with sugar, food coloring, and trans fats, make your own! Cream cheese and butter come together perfectly to create a rich and creamy frosting that makes all of your cakes taste better. If you want an example of a great cream cheese frosting (with added fruit compote), check out our Low Carb Spice Cakes with Cream Cheese Frosting.
Purnell JQ, Hokanson JE, Marcovina SM, Steffes MW, Cleary PA, Brunzell JD. Effect of excessive weight gain with intensive therapy of type 1 diabetes on lipid levels and blood pressure: results from the DCCT. Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. JAMA. 1998;280:140–146. doi: 10.1001/jama.280.2.140. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
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