I guess the closest would be almond flour/ground almonds but there is not a direct substitution because wheat flour behave totally differently because it has gluten. Great question to ask and I am so glad you are starting low carb. Begin by baking an established low carb recipe first. All the hard recipe development has been done for you. Enjoy, and welcome.
These side effects typically occur because carbs are the body’s primary fuel source, when carb intake is restricted, the body goes into a state of starvation. This state is extremely stressful for the body and stimulates survival mechanisms which include slowing of the metabolism and a loss of interest in sex (not as important as food for survival). When adequate fats are available in the diet, however, the body will burn those for energy and these issues can be avoided.
Yancy WS Jr, Westman EC, McDuffie JR, Grambow SC, Jeffreys AS, Bolton J, Chalecki A, Oddone EZ, “A randomized trial of a low-carbohydrate diet vs orlistat plus a lowfat diet for weight loss,” Arch Intern Med. 2010 Jan 25;170(2):136-45. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20101008?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=2.
These are amazing! I only had almond meal instead of almond flour and didn’t have a donut pan so I used a muffin pan. I was surprised at how light and fluffy they were, and the taste! Oh my!! I was so wrapped I made another batch today but just left them plain with no coating and they were divine. I also froze some yesterday and thawed one and they freeze excellent. Thank you Maya!

With just 4g of carbs, this pasta, made from hearts of palm, is a plant-based pasta substitute you may not have heard about before. Palmini is low in calories, high in fiber, gluten free, and looks more like traditional pasta than some other alternatives. It can be purchased canned or in pouches. While you can eat it straight from the package, it also cooks up well—keeping its pasta-like consistency.
Long-term use of the ketogenic diet in children increases the risk of slowed or stunted growth, bone fractures, and kidney stones.[18] The diet reduces levels of insulin-like growth factor 1, which is important for childhood growth. Like many anticonvulsant drugs, the ketogenic diet has an adverse effect on bone health. Many factors may be involved such as acidosis and suppressed growth hormone.[38] About one in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones (compared with one in several thousand for the general population). A class of anticonvulsants known as carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (topiramate, zonisamide) are known to increase the risk of kidney stones, but the combination of these anticonvulsants and the ketogenic diet does not appear to elevate the risk above that of the diet alone.[39] The stones are treatable and do not justify discontinuation of the diet.[39] Johns Hopkins Hospital now gives oral potassium citrate supplements to all ketogenic diet patients, resulting in one-seventh of the incidence of kidney stones.[40] However, this empiric usage has not been tested in a prospective controlled trial.[9] Kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis) is associated with the diet for four reasons:[39]
Place sheet pan in a preheated oven at 475°F and lower heat to 350°F. Bake for 5 to 8 minutes. Watch closely as you need to avoid overcooking. If small bubbles start to appear, lower heat to 300°F and continue baking for 2 to 3 minutes until all sides and center are done. (You can test for doneness just like testing a cake with a toothpick, if you wish).
You deserve a medal for this recipe!!! I made it earlier today and it is absolutely AMAZING! It exceeded my expectations! It’s so delicious! It made enough to completely fill an extra large rectangle Tupperware. I was obsessed with natures valley granola before I went Keto and this is the same exact look and texture but this tastes even better! I’m so excited about this because I was getting sick of eggs for breakfast lol. Thank you, thank you, thank you!
Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show specific very-low-carb diets help people with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Researchers are also studying the effects of these diets on acne, cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and nervous system diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Lou Gehrig's disease.
When dietary CHO is of sufficient quantity the body has the ability to store small amounts for later use. Stored CHO is referred to as glycogen. Body reserves of glycogen, however, are limited, with relatively small amounts stored in the liver and skeletal muscle. As CHO is the “go to” energy source for the CNS, as well as an important energy source for other tissues, the body must maintain a stable supply of circulating blood glucose. While this is a complex process, the liver is primarily responsible for either breaking down stored glycogen or manufacturing small amounts of glucose in a process known as gluconeogenesis. In this manner the liver is able to maintain circulating blood glucose levels under most conditions. If the liver is unable to supply a sufficient amount of glucose, blood sugar levels will fall and result in hypoglycemia, a condition characterized by hunger, fatigue, headache, nausea and impairments in cognitive ability. In sporting terms hypoglycemia is referred to as “bonking” or “hitting the wall” and significantly affects athletic performance. Therefore, it is easy to understand the perceived need for dietary CHO; in the absence of sufficient blood glucose, physiological function is rapidly compromised.
Several studies have investigated the potential of LCD or KD on weight loss. For example, Brinkworth et al. (2) compared one year of low-fat (LF) vs. LCD diet in adults with abdominal obesity. Subjects were randomly assigned and diets were isocaloric, with moderate energy restriction. Both groups realized significant weight loss, however, there was no significant difference between groups, suggesting that a LCD was equally effective as a LF diet.
2. Raygan, F., Bahmani, F., Kouchaki, E., Aghadavod, E., Sharifi, S., Akbari, E., . . . Asemi, Z. (2016). Comparative effects of carbohydrate versus fat restriction on metabolic profiles, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight patients with Type 2 diabetic and coronary heart disease: A randomized clinical trial. PMID: 28607566 
As a newbie to Keto, and after perusing many Keto websites, I find yours to be the most satisfying in many ways. Your recipes are down to earth desirable substitutes for the things we hate most to switch from in a regular diet. And I was thrilled to see your breakdown of the carb friendly items in these easy to use tables. It is very difficult at first to dial in the macro percentages needed daily, because one might focus on a low carb item, to add for the day, only to find out that the protein blows your schedule. So tables are a very concise and effective snapshot of what one might add in any meal segment. I would love to see similar tables reflecting the protein in different food groups and also one reflecting sugars. With those three printed out and in front of me, it would be a lot easier to navigate the landscape. Thanks for the time and effort you put into this.
After going low-carb, I was resigned to never eating a satisfactory brownie ever again. And then... I made these brownies. Holy smokes! I followed the directions on the back for the fudgy brownies and they were everything I wanted in a brownie (basically a low carb version of what I used to get from those Gihardelli high carb mixes from Costco) AND sugar free/low carb!
I needed a break from breakfast chia pudding, and I found this lovely recipe. I’ve been craving sugary cereals since I started Keto. I made this the night before and had it the next morning. This was everything I wanted and more, and also super simple to make. Mine weren’t as crunchy as I’d hoped (were still soft and cookie-like next day), but were still amazing! Probably because I stored them in the fridge overnight. Either way, delicious and nutritious and took me back to Cinnamon Toast Crunch, so 10/10!!
Kelp noodles: Made from seaweed, kelp noodles are low in carbs, calories, and fat. They’re also a great source of calcium. Kelp noodles have a basic bland taste and texture, which makes them great for soaking up and showing off complex flavors. While they’re often featured in Asian dishes, they work well as pasta replacements in other cuisines, too.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Kossoff EH, Zupec-Kania BA, Amark PE, Ballaban-Gil KR, Bergqvist AG, Blackford R, et al. Optimal clinical management of children receiving the ketogenic diet: recommendations of the International Ketogenic Diet Study Group. Epilepsia. 2009 Feb;50(2):304–17. doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2008.01765.x. PMID 18823325
Arguably the most challenging period of transitioning to a ketogenic diet is the first few days as your body adjusts to the dramatic decrease in carbohydrate intake and your metabolism begins its shift to fat as its primary fuel source. It is not uncommon during this period to experience a lack of energy, irritability, ravenous hunger, and brain fog, symptoms commonly referred to as the “low-carb flu.” These uncomfortable symptoms arise because a ketogenic diet eliminates the spikes in blood sugar that follow carb-heavy meals, keeping insulin levels low (because it is no longer needed in response to said blood sugar spikes) and triggering the kidneys to excrete high levels of electrolytes—think sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Additionally, many people transition to a ketogenic diet from a standard, modern diet, which was likely rich in processed foods packed with sodium, so electrolyte levels drop simply because you aren’t getting enough sodium to replace that which you previously took in from processed foods. In the end, if you do not replace these excreted and/or missing electrolytes in your new ketogenic diet, it can ultimately lead to a drop in blood pressure and bring about the symptoms of “low-carb flu.”
I actually went on a ketogenic diet last year to see if it would help my migraines. I have a history of chronic migraines which would usually last 3 days, sometimes longer. Triptans help a lot but I don’t like having to take them. I stayed in ketosis for about 8 months and experienced a significant reduction in migraines, from feeling some type of headache (mild o r severe) almost everyday to 1 or 2x per month while in ketosis. Although I’m very healthy otherwise, I do think my migraines may have something to do with blood sugar fluctuations (despite previously eating a whole foods diet and no refined carbs), and keto totally stabilized this. I eventually came off of Keto because I’m not really a meat lover. When I came off, but remained low carb, my migraines stayed under control for the most part. When I increase carbs, they do return.
Toasted coconut flakes make the perfect alternative to corn flakes in cereals like this one, letting you still enjoy the crunch but without the added issues that traditional cereals can cause. Just be careful to watch the flakes as they toast so they don’t burn. Serve this cereal with your favorite milk and a few berries and you have a tasty and filling breakfast cereal to keep you going all morning.
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