2. Adzuki Bean Pasta from ExploreAsian, Gluten-Free: This one has a different flavor than it’s black bean counterpart, and has twice as many carbs. But at 11 grams of carbs per serving, that’s still a lot fewer carbs than traditional pasta. You could even mix this pasta into the pot of boiling water with the black bean pasta to change things up and reduce the carbs in your bowl at the same time. (This company has some higher carb bean pasta variations, too!)
To make squares: Place dough on a piece of parchment paper, with a second piece of parchment on top. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough into a thin and even layer about 1/4-1/8” thick. Remove the top piece of parchment paper. Using a pizza cutter, cut into small squares (about 1”). Bake in the oven for 5 minutes, then take baking sheet from oven and carefully break up the squares (so they’re no longer connected). Bake for another 7 minutes. Allow to cool and enjoy!
Carbohydrates are a good source of quick energy to fuel your body's natural functions and keep you going during busy days. They have gotten a bad reputation in the fitness and weight-loss worlds, though, because many typical carbs that people take in are starchy, sugary, salty and contain no useful nutrition. Choose the right kind of low-carb cereal and you can enjoy a quick and convenient breakfast or snack entirely guilt-free.
I made this bread several times now using ground flaxseed in place of the psyllium powder and it came out perfect every time. I decided to try it as a sweet bread and added 1/2 cup raisins, 1 Tbsp. cinnamon, 1/4 cup erythritol and 2 Tbsp. Splenda. After it was done I iced it with 1/2 cup powdered sugar mixed with enough milk (about 1 Tbsp. to keep it thick but a little runny. Now I have a healthy, delicious, loaf of cinnamon raisin bread. Thanks for the great recipe!

The ingredients above are usually quite expensive and might take some experimenting to get the hang of using. The low-carb or keto way of eating by no means require baking. If you don’t miss bread you certainly don’t need to replace it with a low-carb version but if you do miss bread or maybe just miss the baking itself the recipes below might be of interest to you.


I saw your recipe on Highfalutin today and since it is snowing I gave it a try to add to our chicken noodle soup. The recipe is super!!! Now we can have noodles without all of the carbs. The soup and noodles turned out so good. I used parchment paper and a cookie sheet that decided it needed a new wonky shape when heated( mixture was really thick on on side) but I was able to salvage all of the mix after repeatedly reheating the thicker portions until they were set. No sogginess in the noodles and they held up well in the soup. Kudo’s to your creativity! Now to try them in other things as mentioned in the comments that I didn’t read before making the recipe, whoops!!
There are many recipes here that use coconut flour OR almond flour. Some I even have instructions to use both (from the post above, you can see they are not easily interchangeable). Is he tolerant of almond flour? I have many recipes which use that. Some recipes that use a small quantity of almond flour/meal, you can actually use some seed flours such as sunflower or pumpkin. I managed to make Fat Head pizza once using ground sunflower seeds when I ran out of almond flour.
If you are wondering what the heck a daikon radish is, don’t worry, I was in the same boat this time last year. My first experience with daikon radish was in my CSA box. I actually got a purple daikon radish and had absolutely no idea what to do with it. So I pulled out all my cookbooks and found a recipe in my Inspiralize Everything cookbook (affiliate link).
I’m new to this type of baking. My husband is borderline diabetic, so I decided to try more low card recipes, by eliminating wheat flours from our diet. I’ve tried some other bread recipes that didn’t deliver the expected results, but this one did. And its so simple to make. My husband remarked that the texture reminded him of rye bread, and asked it there was something we could add to give it more of a rye bread flavor. I did a little research and discovered that caraway seeds would do the trick. I partially ground about 2 teaspoons and soaked in warm water for a few minutes, then drained before adding it to the batter. It worked!
I doubled the recipe. Accidentally added 3tsps baking powder. Also added 1/4 cup ground flax, 1/4 cup sesame seeds, 1/2 cup slivered almonds. I then mixed it for 3 minutes in my stand mixer. I baked the bread for 60 min and then added 10 and then another 10more. I used a thermometer and let it get to 200 degrees internal temperature.. That’s what I use for regular bread and seems accurate for your recipe. I’ll try to send a picture. It looks like bakery bread and tastes delicious. My family who are Leary of myGF and grain Free experiments love this bread!!!!
So here is the deal, all of my clients tell me they want to eat more vegetables, but they are short on time and really don’t enjoy spending half their Sunday in the kitchen doing meal prep. And I HEAR YOU! So I’m trying to find new exciting ways to enjoy vegetables without spending hours in the kitchen. My solution, this low carb pasta recipe with only 3 ingredients. It’s ready in under 10 minutes!
Hi Jan, Sorry they didn’t work for you. It’s hard to say what happened without being in the kitchen with you. Did you use exactly the same ingredients and amounts? Also, if they were not cooked, then they probably needed to be in the oven for longer. If they were clumpy, it’s also possible that the almond flour wasn’t fine blanched (it needs to be) or the batter wasn’t mixed well enough. Hope this helps.
FRUITS: Don't choose fruit juices—you're just paying someone to take the fiber out of your food. Instead, eat the fruit itself, and get 3.1 grams of fiber. You can get a serious fiber bang for your carb buck with berries (a half cup of raspberries adds 4 fiber grams, blackberries add 3.8 and blueberries or strawberries add 1.7) and kiwis (2.7 grams per fruit). Always accompany fruit with protein and/or fat such as nuts or cheese to slow any negative impact of the natural sugars on blood-sugar levels.
With that in mind, would you recommend adding additional eggs and/or liquid to account for the absorption properties of the coconut flour? Perhaps eggs, egg whites, yogurt, or cream? The original recipe (which calls for two large eggs) has a great balance of crispy/chewy, so I will be trying to approximate that as closely as possible. I know it’s going to take some experimentation, just trying to make an educated guess on the starting point.
These take care of my bread craving. And, being a person who didn’t want to start out by purchasing a donut pan, I used and 8×8 glass pan; greased and lined (the bottom) with parchment paper. The recipe has the consistency of pudding before it sets and easily conforms to the pan. Also, since I used a glass pan, I lowered the temperature to 325 degrees, cooking time was the same. I cut my ‘donut cake’ into 6ths and it’s delicious. I also I don’t add the topping. Thank you for this recipe.
Non-GMO low-carb pastas are a good option if you're concerned about the potential effects on your health of consuming genetically altered ingredients. Though there are competing views in the scientific community with regard to the long-term safety of regular GMO consumption, many choose to eat only non-GMO products as an extra-cautious measure. Similarly, organic low-carb pastas that include ingredients that haven't been treated with or exposed to chemicals are easy to find.
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