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Some health experts recommend people get between 45 and 65 percent of their daily calories from carbs, with more active people erring on the higher side and less active people eating fewer carbs. For example, an active woman between the ages of 19 and 25, who is aiming to maintain weight, should consume about 2,600 calories that include 293-423 grams of carbs a day. They should then get 15 to 25 percent of calories from fat and protein.
The remaining calories in the keto diet come from protein — about 1 gram (g) per kilogram of body weight, so a 140-pound woman would need about 64 g of protein total. As for carbs: “Every body is different, but most people maintain ketosis with between 20 and 50 g of net carbs per day,” says Mattinson. Total carbohydrates minus fiber equals net carbs, she explains.

A: The most common ways to track your carbs is through MyFitnessPal and their mobile app. You cannot track net carbs on the app, although you can track your total carb intake and your total fiber intake. To get your net carbs, just subtract your total fiber intake from your total carb intake. I have written an article on How to Track Carbs on MyFitnessPal.


Creaming the butter properly with the sweeter is paramount here to build a nice structure for the cookies (think rise and crunch!). And creaming with sweetener, in case you haven’t done it before, takes a bit longer to incorporate than with good-old sugar. But don’t give up, and keep going until you’ve got the sweetener well incorporated into soft and fluffy butter.

Yes, some ideas on meal plans and very easy recipes would be very helpful. I’m 67, very overweight, diabetes, high blood pressure. My big love are all the carbs. This way of life seems impossible to me, all that fat just doesn’t sound appealing. I can’t see how to eat that much fat a day. Years ago, I did try Dr. Atkins diet but I had a very hard time with the very limited carbs. But now, I need to something drastic but haven’t a clue how to start.
Thank you so much for all of this great info! My husband started a Keto plan two weeks ago so I have been researching going Keto for a few weeks now. I figured I’d use him as a guinea pig to test buying food, preparing and cooking meals to see how easy or hard it would be to hit his macros for the day. I decided to start it this week (today is my fourth day) so now I am doubling up on the recipes so there’s enough for the both of us. I am still constantly looking for more recipes and trying to get more comfortable with changing up food so we are not eating the same things everyday. I can’t wait to try the meatloaf since it’s one of my favorite dishes! Thank you again for all the work you put in to sharing this info with others!
Prior to the advent of exogenous insulin for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the 1920's, the mainstay of therapy was dietary modification. Diet recommendations in that era were aimed at controlling glycemia (actually, glycosuria) and were dramatically different from current low-fat, high-carbohydrate dietary recommendations for patients with diabetes [1,2]. For example, the Dr. Elliot Joslin Diabetic Diet in 1923 consisted of "meats, poultry, game, fish, clear soups, gelatin, eggs, butter, olive oil, coffee, tea" and contained approximately 5% of energy from carbohydrates, 20% from protein, and 75% from fat [3]. A similar diet was advocated by Dr. Frederick Allen of the same era [4].
However, replacing high carb flours like all-purpose flour, wheat flour, corn flour, and rice flour with low-carb flour is not as simple as just using one for the other. Due to the difference in composition between high-carb and low-carb flours, you will need to use different amounts of low-carb flour together with other essential ingredients that you don’t typically find in traditional baking recipes like psyllium husk, xanthan gum, and protein powder.

Normal dietary fat contains mostly long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are more ketogenic than LCTs because they generate more ketones per unit of energy when metabolised. Their use allows for a diet with a lower proportion of fat and a greater proportion of protein and carbohydrate,[18] leading to more food choices and larger portion sizes.[4] The original MCT diet developed by Peter Huttenlocher in the 1970s derived 60% of its calories from MCT oil.[15] Consuming that quantity of MCT oil caused abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting in some children. A figure of 45% is regarded as a balance between achieving good ketosis and minimising gastrointestinal complaints. The classical and modified MCT ketogenic diets are equally effective and differences in tolerability are not statistically significant.[9] The MCT diet is less popular in the United States; MCT oil is more expensive than other dietary fats and is not covered by insurance companies.[18]
One downside to a ketogenic diet for weight loss is the difficulty maintaining it. “Studies show that weight loss results from being on a low-carb diet for more than 12 months tend to be the same as being on a normal, healthy diet,” says Mattinson. While you may be eating more satiating fats (like peanut butter, regular butter, or avocado), you’re also way more limited in what’s allowed on the diet, which can make everyday situations, like eating dinner with family or going out with friends, far more difficult. Because people often find it tough to sustain, it’s easy to rely on it as a short-term diet rather than a long-term lifestyle.
Oatmeal is something we all miss when it starts to get cold outside, but it is filled with carbs. You can easily make your own oatmeal by following one of the many recipes online. Or, if you’d like a different twist on oatmeal, give our Cinnamon Roll Oatmeal a try. Using what you might think are strange ingredients (cue cauliflower), you get an absolutely delicious faux oatmeal.
Almond Meal is made slightly different than almond flour. Instead of blanching the almonds to remove the skins, the skins on the almonds are kept on. It’s a little bit coarser than almond flour and still bakes the same. For baked goods, I like to use a super fine ground almond flour but I will equally use almond meal as it seems to perform just as well in most recipes, at a reduced cost.
It’s a habit to enjoy a brie cheese for desert instead of a piece of chocolate cake but each are favored deserts in France. I’m personally more satisfied after a 350 calorie sized wedge of brie than the same number of calories of cake.. which will give me sugar crash and .. really I’d like two slices of cake(I’ve got a sweet tooth that once I get going it wants to keep being fed)
Katie, Almond flour is probably the easiest keto-friendly flour for a new cook to work with. It’s very versatile and can be used in recipes for cookies, muffins, breads, scones, cakes, etc. (Of course the ratio of almond flour to other ingredients changes based on what you’re making.) But with that being said, because almond flour doesn’t have gluten, it can be difficult to simulate the soft crumb of regular baked goods unless you combine almond flour with another keto-friendly flour and/or a binding agent. This is why a lot of our recipes call for more than one type of flour. I hope this helps! If you’re looking for a certain recipe in particular please let us know and we’ll try to point you in the right direction! 

If you’re new or just still learning the ropes for the keto diet food list, your biggest questions probably revolve around figuring out just what high-fat low-carb foods you can eat on such a low-carb, ketogenic diet. Overall, remember that the bulk of calories on the keto diet are from foods that are high in natural fats along with a moderate amount of foods with protein. Those that are severely restricted are all foods that provide lots of carbs, even kinds that are normally thought of as “healthy,” like whole grains, for example.
Hi Cathy, are you adapting these recipes yourself or are they already developed using coconut flour? From experience, it takes a lot of attempts to get it right (but fun too, it brings out the scientist in me). Coconut flour requires a high number of eggs for volume, thickening, protein, binding, and structure. I would be worried if there was too much avocado in there as that is just adding a soft ingredient that gives no structure. The sweet potato would add volume but unless there is enough eggs and coconut flour in the recipe, again it won’t add to the solidity of the final recipe. Psyllium I add purely to get a better crumb texture. It swells and thickens and helps bind all the other ingredients together nicely. Scones – they won’t have risen because of the lack of gluten (yay), but I quite like heavy scones as a personal choice. I started baking using recipes that had already been developed using these low-carb flours, and start by adjusting the flavours only not the ratios of the bulk ingredients. You will soon get the hang of them. Start with my flourless berry sponge, I use these ratios all-the-time! Yum.
Almond Meal is made slightly different than almond flour. Instead of blanching the almonds to remove the skins, the skins on the almonds are kept on. It’s a little bit coarser than almond flour and still bakes the same. For baked goods, I like to use a super fine ground almond flour but I will equally use almond meal as it seems to perform just as well in most recipes, at a reduced cost.
Carbohydrate: Most of what determines how ketogenic a diet is will depend on how much carbohydrate is eaten, as well the individual's metabolism and activity level. A diet of less than 50 or 60 grams of net (effective) carbohydrate per day is generally ketogenic. Some sources say to consume no more than 20 grams of carbohydrates per day, while others cite up to 50 grams, and many recommend no more than 5 percent of calories from carbs. However, athletes and people with healthy metabolisms may be able to eat 100 or more grams of net carbohydrate in a day and maintain a desired level of ketosis. At the same time, an older sedentary person with Type 2 diabetes may have to eat less than 30 net grams to achieve the same level.
If you’re one of the lucky people that have a dehydrator, you can take serious advantage of it by dehydrating thin slices of vegetables overnight (normally 12 hours) to get crisp, perfect vegetables that you can eat as snacks. Do this with zucchini, radish, or jicama. If you’re not lucky enough to have a dehydrator (like me), then you can easily make cheese chips in the oven and flavor them with your own spices!
I’m trying your recipe for the first time. It is very similar to a bun recipe that I make with psyllium husks so I am incorporating the method from that into this recipe. I made a few slight changes… I added garlic powder ground Rosemary and oregano, one quarter cup ground flaxseed, one tablespoon apple cider vinegar. I only used 3 eggs, and increased the Water by 2 tablespoons. By adding apple cider vinegar and the baking soda, they create a very light effervescent foam as they interactwhen I add the warm water, which acts naturally to the raise the bread, thereby allowing me to decrease the eggs. I added the extra water due to the extra dry ingredients. I’m very confident that this will work out very well. It always works with my buns so I’m eager to test this out. Thank you again for the base recipe.
Hi Paula, Sorry that you were disappointed. The color likely has to do with the brand of psyllium husk powder; some of them turn purple when baking, though this is not harmful. The brand I use is linked on the recipe card and does not turn purple (as shown in the pictures). Regarding taste and texture, I’d love to help troubleshoot, if you can describe what issue you are seeing.
I have made your beautiful bread a number of times, however today I scored the top to help it rise. Unfortunately it rose too quickly and it has a huge hole in right through the middle of it 🙁 might be good for toad in the hole tomorrow morning but not much else 🙂 do you know how I can prevent the hole next time? I was so excited about the heigh of this attempt but may have to stop the scoring in the future. Thx

As with cold cereals, your best bet for a low-carb breakfast cereal comes in the form of whole grains. Oatmeal is an excellent choice because it is high in fiber and contains a substance called beta-glucan, which slows down the digestive process. That means you will stay full throughout the morning. Bran cereals can also be eaten hot, and whole grains such as quinoa or grits can be flavored to be either savory or sweet. Quinoa goes especially well with walnuts and raisins, dates or dried figs. It is is also scrumptious when flavored with a little bit of coriander and served with a poached egg on top. Grits are also a natural partner for eggs, but they are also delicious with pecans and fresh blueberries. Drizzle a bit of honey, agave or real maple syrup on top for sweetness. This will increase the carb count a bit, but the nutritional benefits of starting your day with a hearty, hot breakfast are more than worth the few extra carbs.


FRUITS: Don't choose fruit juices—you're just paying someone to take the fiber out of your food. Instead, eat the fruit itself, and get 3.1 grams of fiber. You can get a serious fiber bang for your carb buck with berries (a half cup of raspberries adds 4 fiber grams, blackberries add 3.8 and blueberries or strawberries add 1.7) and kiwis (2.7 grams per fruit). Always accompany fruit with protein and/or fat such as nuts or cheese to slow any negative impact of the natural sugars on blood-sugar levels.
Children who discontinue the diet after achieving seizure freedom have about a 20% risk of seizures returning. The length of time until recurrence is highly variable, but averages two years. This risk of recurrence compares with 10% for resective surgery (where part of the brain is removed) and 30–50% for anticonvulsant therapy. Of those who have a recurrence, just over half can regain freedom from seizures either with anticonvulsants or by returning to the ketogenic diet. Recurrence is more likely if, despite seizure freedom, an electroencephalogram shows epileptiform spikes, which indicate epileptic activity in the brain but are below the level that will cause a seizure. Recurrence is also likely if an MRI scan shows focal abnormalities (for example, as in children with tuberous sclerosis). Such children may remain on the diet longer than average, and children with tuberous sclerosis who achieve seizure freedom could remain on the ketogenic diet indefinitely.[46]
Almond flour is a gluten-free nut flour that should consist of nothing but ground blanched almonds. This means that you can make your own at home, from scratch, by grinding whole blanched almonds to a fine meal (unless you just want to buy it). Using a coffee or spice grinder usually works best. Be careful not to grind them for too long or the nuts will release their fat and you´ll end up with almond butter, which is a great tasting nut butter but perhaps not what you were going for when making almond flour.
The KD stands in stark contrast to current macronutrient recommendations for both health promotion, as well as enhancement of athletic performance (7,21). The KD is characterized by a macronutrient distribution ratio consisting of approximately 70 – 80% fat, 10 – 20% protein and <5% carbohydrate (CHO), with daily CHO intake limited to ≤50 grams. Two of the most prominent and vocal researchers of the KD, Jeff Volek, PhD and Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, in their book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance, recommend protein consumption of 0.6 – 1.0 grams per lb of lean body mass, a figure which almost perfectly matches the commonly recommended protein intake for athletes (i.e., 1.2 – 2.0 g/kg bodyweight) (21,26). With CHO intake radically restricted and protein within the commonly recommended range, fat becomes the primary macronutrient target for manipulation.
At 64 I had over 125 lbs to lose. I started a Keto Diet 7 months ago and have lost 75lbs. I have a number of autominnune issues and my health was so bad I was almost bedridden. I now do a water workout twice a week and yoga. I can see a low carb diet being my way of life after I get down to my goal weight. I feel so much better and I agree I am never hungry. I recommend the Bullet Proof Coffee for Kate. Coffee with cream, coconut butter and butter, blend. Adds fat to your diet and keeps you full.

In addition, on the day the diet was initiated, diabetes medications were reduced – generally, insulin doses were halved, and sulfonylurea doses were halved or discontinued. Due to the possible diuretic effects of the diet soon after initiation, diuretic medications were discontinued if of low dosage (up to 25 mg of hydrochlorothiazide or 20 mg of furosemide) or halved if of higher dosage. Participants were also instructed to take a standard multivitamin and drink 6–8 glasses of water daily, and were encouraged to exercise aerobically for 30 minutes at least three times per week.


Hi Sandy, You might be able to deep fry them (haven’t tried), but you’d still have to bake them first. The batter is too thin to just straight deep fry, it wouldn’t hold together. You can make them into a different shape if you don’t have a donut pan; some people have used muffin tins. Otherwise the cheap but great donut pan I use is linked in the post above if you want to get one.
Hi Joellen, It doesn’t rise as much as a wheat bread but does a little. The almond flour being frozen might have made it worse, I’m not sure – I don’t store mine there since I go through it a lot. I’m glad you like the texture. If you want a taller loaf, you can multiply the recipe by 1.5 or even double it, but would need to increase the cook time and probably cover it to prevent browning the top too much before the middle is done.
I have great respect for Harvard Medical School. I notice that they support their readers posting comments and I am most appreciative of the article and all the many thoughtful comments by the readers. The readers seem to have the most expertise here and I hope that the doctor who wrote the article will think long and hard about the comments by readers. After 35 years of clinical practice in mental health, I notice that all issues of emotion involve medical issues, nutrition, and the gut bacteria. I would say that these issues and all of the executive brain functions seem to improve with ketogenic principles. For those that apply it in a flexible and smart manner, it appears to improve every area of their lives. I strongly encourage the author of the article to take one class via The Institute for Functional Medicine. If he is open to more learning he can take more classes and get certified. I’m sure a fine doctor, he will be an even better doctor and personally healthier, if he gets more training. Are we all open to new learning(especially us healthcare providers)?
I’ve been doing keto on and off for a year. Before that, I explored eliminating “inflammatory” or “reactive” foods based on another eating program. I have Celiac and autoimmune issues and I think one of the reasons people stall with Keto is because they are eating too many typically “inflammatory” foods–foods that your body has a harder time digesting and as a result create systemic inflammation which, in turn, cause weight loss plateaus. For those trying to fight through a Keto Plateau, I would suggest eliminating ALL dairy (try subbing ghee for butter), artificial sweeteners (including stevia and erythritol) and all nuts for 5 days. I know it sounds close to impossible but all three of these Keto staples are some of the biggest culprits of inflammation in the body. I found this suggestion on another Keto website and tried it and dropped 6 lbs in 5 days. Another typically inflammatory food is Eggs. If you can’t eliminate all of these foods at once, try eliminating one at a time for a minimum of 5 days and see if there is any movement on the scale. For those who have stalled, chances are at least one of your Keto staples is holding you up. Good luck! 
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