Low-carbohydrate, or low-carb, flour is similar in function to regular flour, but the source of the flour is different. Most flour comes from wheat and grains, but low-carb flour typically comes from nuts, seeds or legumes, which accounts for the lower carbohydrate amount. As a trade off, most of these sources are higher in fat, which may be a problem for some people. Protein, fat and carbohydrate amounts are different from ordinary flour, so this flour typically will perform and act differently compared to regular white flour. A potential problem is that this type of flour is made from many common allergens, so people with certain food sensitivities may become sick from using this flour.
I was quite high in protein and ate a moderate amount of fat.  It was just right since I was maintaining my weight, but not low enough to firm, tone and see the muscle I wanted to achieve. I’ve been seeing a trainer twice a week for the last year for full body workouts, but just wasn’t satisfied with how my body was responding. I recently decided a keto diet might be best to really achieve the tone and muscle I was looking for.

Thank you! I think though many doctors and nutritionists are not keto friendly at all. They still believe in moderation and that grains are important, my own hubby’s doctor, same thing. That way of eating has failed for so many of us, even my husband. I think the keto diet is especially helpful if you’re in pre-menopausal, but that’s just my 2 cents. I’d say do more research. I’v found Dr.Jockers on youtube and Dr.Eric berg to have sound advice.


The remaining calories in the keto diet come from protein — about 1 gram (g) per kilogram of body weight, so a 140-pound woman would need about 64 g of protein total. As for carbs: “Every body is different, but most people maintain ketosis with between 20 and 50 g of net carbs per day,” says Mattinson. Total carbohydrates minus fiber equals net carbs, she explains.
Providing additional support Paoli et al. (17) examined the effect of a modified KD diet (~55% fat, 41% protein, and 4.5% CHO) on performance and body composition in gymnasts. In a crossover design, researchers compared independent 30-day dietary regimens consisting of “normal diet” (WD; 46.8% CHO, 38.5% fat, and 14.7% protein) and modified KD in nine elite male gymnasts. There were no significant changes from pre to post during either dietary intervention for measures of physical performance, indicating the absence of significant dietary CHO did not negatively impact physical ability. The post-KD measurements, however, saw a significant decrease in fat mass (pre: 5.3; post:
A Cochrane systematic review in 2018 found and analysed eleven randomized controlled trials of ketogenic diet in people with epilepsy for whom drugs failed to control their seizures.[2] Six of the trials compared a group assigned to a ketogenic diet with a group not assigned to one. The other trials compared types of diets or ways of introducing them to make them more tolerable.[2] In the largest trial of the ketogenic diet with a non-diet control[16], nearly 38% of the children and young people had half or fewer seizures with the diet compared 6% with the group not assigned to the diet. Two large trials of the Modified Atkins Diet compared to a non-diet control had similar results, with over 50% of children having half or fewer seizures with the diet compared to around 10% in the control group.[2]

FRUITS: Don't choose fruit juices—you're just paying someone to take the fiber out of your food. Instead, eat the fruit itself, and get 3.1 grams of fiber. You can get a serious fiber bang for your carb buck with berries (a half cup of raspberries adds 4 fiber grams, blackberries add 3.8 and blueberries or strawberries add 1.7) and kiwis (2.7 grams per fruit). Always accompany fruit with protein and/or fat such as nuts or cheese to slow any negative impact of the natural sugars on blood-sugar levels.
The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]
I was a Corpsman (not a corpse-man as some recent somewhat fanatical president would say), and I can tell you many stories of Marines and Sailors who maintained restrictive diets (aka picky eaters). Most obvious was lack of sustaining energy (hypoglycemia) at mile 15 (with 80lbs of gear including a 6.5lb rifle and 200 rnds of ammo, etc.) and depletion of essential vitamins, electrolyte imbalance. They were always the first to collapse and have to hear me scold “see I told you so.” An IV of D5W usually does the trick (D is for dextrose, OMG!)
Carbohydrates are used to make glycogen, which is required for muscle function. The difference between this and common meal plans is the amount of carb intake is limited to enough for the glycogen production of a normal person. Not every carbohydrate is created equal. Sugar alcohols don’t affect most people’s blood sugar levels. Nor does most fiber. A keto eater is interested in net carbs, figured by total carbohydrate minus fiber minus sugar alcohols.
5. Ciao Carb: Like Carba-Nada, there are still plenty of carbs in this pasta, but fewer than traditional pasta, at 17 grams per serving after subtracting the fiber. Made with a variety of soy, gluten, wheat, and egg, in my opinion these don’t come anywhere near the wholesomeness of the bean pasta varieties at the top of this list. But if you’re looking for something that looks like pasta and tastes like pasta, without quite as much carby-boom, this will do it for you!
In one week my husband lost 1.5 kg because of Keto diet and recipes. Thank you for the insights and tips. I would like to have a complete recipe for meals everyday and hoping by subscribing I will receive try my mail. I will keep u posted. It takes 2 to tango. The one who wants to diet must be cooperative with the plan and execution while the other person who is preparing the food must be patient to the dieting person. Its not easy to change meals so patience is required

I had pasta last night, and I feel guilty that I cheated. This recipe is that good. I followed your directions exactly, including simmering the noodles in some sauce for a few minutes. What size pan did you use? It was hard for me to estimate and I ended up throwing away some egg mixture. Putting pan sizes in all your wonderful recipes would be helpful. Keep up the good work. You are my low-carb, go-to guru.
Hi Louise, I haven’t tried that product so can’t say for sure if it’s a good choice, but it sounds like it is if the recipe worked for you – which is great! Feel free to add herbs, spices, or garlic powder if you want some flavor to the bread. I kept it plain to be used for many different applications. The number of slices will depend on how thick you cut them and the size of your pan.
After the 1st time I started making these i started making it as a cake using a small casserole dish cutting into 8 pieces, without the sugar/cinnamon topping. I tried monk fruit sugar and love it (new at Costco in Seattle) I also used 2% milk (all I had on-hand). I’ve made several batches and theres been some on the counter for 2 weeks now. My husband and I love having a treat we can grab on the go.
Finally! A granola that I don’t HAVE to put any kind of a sweetener in! I’ve been keto for almost 2 years and have really missed a good bowl of granola/cereal for breakfast. Your recipe is perfect. I made it ahead of time and keep it in an airtight container. It’s so nice to be able to grab the container, pour some in a bowl and enjoy, and for me, I find that the nuts give a good flavor without the sweetener. I’m always looking for recipes that I don’t HAVE to use a sweetener in because almost all of the ones used in LCHF recipes cause war in my bowels, sigh. This recipe is perfect. THANK YOU so much for getting online for the rest of us. 🙂
Hi John, Thank you for the feedback. Sometimes this bread takes a little more effort to rise and the batter has to be mixed well to create air bubbles. Use very fresh baking powder, too. The bluish tint can come from an interaction with the psyllium husk powder, and the brand I use (linked on the recipe card) doesn’t usually do this, but either way it’s safe to eat. I’m glad you still liked it!
At $12.99 for 12 ounces it can get expensive. It’s times like these when I long for Germany, where a big bag of walnuts flour is 1.60 Euro. Benefits are great bang for the buck. There’s lots of protein in nut flours, amino acids, omega-3s and vitamins. There’s plant fiber and healthy fat. It helps you control your blood sugar, and keeps you full until the next meal. These are just a few of the benefits of nut flours in general.
Consequently, when you begin a ketogenic diet, it acts as a metabolic stressor on the body. In the process of relearning how to burn fat for energy, a mild metabolic stress is inflicted upon your mitochondria. This stress is just powerful enough to kill off old and dysfunctional mitochondria which stimulates the growth of new and more powerful mitochondria (5). The end result is more energy and a higher level of vitality.
In Asia, the normal diet includes rice and noodles as the main energy source, making their elimination difficult. Therefore, the MCT-oil form of the diet, which allows more carbohydrate, has proved useful. In India, religious beliefs commonly affect the diet: some patients are vegetarians, will not eat root vegetables or avoid beef. The Indian ketogenic diet is started without a fast due to cultural opposition towards fasting in children. The low-fat, high-carbohydrate nature of the normal Indian and Asian diet means that their ketogenic diets typically have a lower ketogenic ratio (1:1) than in America and Europe. However, they appear to be just as effective.[54]
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