In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones.

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


The ketogenic diet achieved national media exposure in the US in October 1994, when NBC's Dateline television programme reported the case of Charlie Abrahams, son of Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams. The two-year-old suffered from epilepsy that had remained uncontrolled by mainstream and alternative therapies. Abrahams discovered a reference to the ketogenic diet in an epilepsy guide for parents and brought Charlie to John M. Freeman at Johns Hopkins Hospital, which had continued to offer the therapy. Under the diet, Charlie's epilepsy was rapidly controlled and his developmental progress resumed. This inspired Abrahams to create the Charlie Foundation to promote the diet and fund research.[10] A multicentre prospective study began in 1994, the results were presented to the American Epilepsy Society in 1996 and were published[17] in 1998. There followed an explosion of scientific interest in the diet. In 1997, Abrahams produced a TV movie, ...First Do No Harm, starring Meryl Streep, in which a young boy's intractable epilepsy is successfully treated by the ketogenic diet.[1]
I think I might have been in ketosis sooner but after 1 month I took my blood test at night and I was surely in and I had felt all the good effects of it too, like no hunger between meals etc. It wasn’t difficult to reduce the carbs to 20 net because you’re replacing it with good healthy fat which is so filling. I think my body likes to hold on to the fat as stubbornly as yours and I agree stress doesn’t help, but I have always been a slow loser. I’d suggest taking measurements and body fat and pictures so you can see the difference. If you really think you’re not progressing you may have to reduce calories too.
Keto low carb: less than 20 grams of carbs per day. This level will be ketogenic for most people — if protein intake remains moderate. In our keto recipes, less than 4 per cent of its total energy is coming from carbs, and the rest will come from protein and fat. In keto recipes we also keep the protein level moderate, as excess protein can be converted to glucose in your body. See note* below.
Hi Brandie, If you used pulp from making almond milk, that is likely the issue. This would be almond meal, not finely ground blanched almond flour. Homemade ground almonds generally aren’t as fine as the store bought blanched almond flour, and this affects the texture in baked goods in a pretty big way. Not using fresh baking powder would definitely contribute as well. Sounds like a good idea to add some baking soda and cider vinegar to compensate, but I haven’t tried it. Try it with super fine blanched almond flour next time and it should definitely rise more.
Overall, to get a good nutrition calculation (1) weigh all dry ingredients instead of volumetric (go try and weigh a cup of pecans, pour it out, try again, etc; you will see you probably have around 10% variance, and that variance skyrockets when you start talking about smaller quantities like 1/4 cup due to how the nuts pack in); (2) add all the ingredients into your recipe calculator of choice (I use mynetdiary.com, but YMMV); (3) weigh the final result out to find a total weight of results; (4) divide that weight by the number of servings, to see what weight your servings should be. You could also get a volumetric measure of servings after that just for fun, but see above about volumetric measures of dry goods (especially chunky, variably sized dry goods like this).
Hi Shaina, I’m glad you liked it and sorry it turned out more egg-y than you wanted it. I don’t find it to be that way but for some people it might be. You may be able to substitute more egg whites for some of the eggs, but the end result would be more dense. Instead, you might want to try my new keto paleo white bread recipe. It’s light and fluffy, and has no egg yolks, so wouldn’t have an egg-y taste at all.
If you are low carb and nut-free, coconut flour may be one of your best options for low carb and keto baking. Still, it’s not an easy flour to work with, especially if you are new to this low carb diet thing. So before you start, I suggest you read my primer on How to Bake with Coconut Flour. You can’t just sub in coconut flour for regular flour or for other low carb flours. It’s very dense and it requires an inordinate amount of eggs to bake properly, so direct substitutions will result in utter failure!
Participants were recruited from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) outpatient clinics. Inclusion criteria were age 35–75 years; body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2; and fasting serum glucose >125 mg/dL or hemoglobin A1c >6.5% without medications, or treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) and/or insulin. Exclusion criteria were evidence of renal insufficiency, liver disease, or unstable cardiovascular disease by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. All participants provided written informed consent approved by the institutional review board. No monetary incentives were provided.
×