Hi Cathy, are you adapting these recipes yourself or are they already developed using coconut flour? From experience, it takes a lot of attempts to get it right (but fun too, it brings out the scientist in me). Coconut flour requires a high number of eggs for volume, thickening, protein, binding, and structure. I would be worried if there was too much avocado in there as that is just adding a soft ingredient that gives no structure. The sweet potato would add volume but unless there is enough eggs and coconut flour in the recipe, again it won’t add to the solidity of the final recipe. Psyllium I add purely to get a better crumb texture. It swells and thickens and helps bind all the other ingredients together nicely. Scones – they won’t have risen because of the lack of gluten (yay), but I quite like heavy scones as a personal choice. I started baking using recipes that had already been developed using these low-carb flours, and start by adjusting the flavours only not the ratios of the bulk ingredients. You will soon get the hang of them. Start with my flourless berry sponge, I use these ratios all-the-time! Yum.
Rest assured, not everyone experiences this side effect of the ketogenic diet and, if you do, it will abate on its own; furthermore, there are some simple preventative steps you can take to lower your likelihood of “catching” this flu. As you adopt a ketogenic diet, make sure you replace electrolytes, eat enough fat to meet your total caloric needs, drink plenty of water, and exercise as you are able. It’s very important, however, to ensure that you aren’t relying on sugary sports drinks to replace electrolytes, as all that added sugar will prevent your metabolism from entering ketosis. Ultimately, electrolytes play a crucial role in our health and many Americans do not consume them at adequate levels, so it is very important to monitor your intake of these nutrients regardless of whether or not you are an adherent of the ketogenic diet.
Besides having the benefits mentioned above, if you really want to make sure you are in ketosis I would suggest buying a glucometer which is a blood test. A simple prick on your finger using ketone strips to measure. Anywhere from 0.5 and up means you are most likely keto adapted. It’s definitely not cheap but it is the most accurate measurement. There are other methods as well, like using urine ketone strips but not as accurate I don’t feel. There is also a breath ketone meter if you hate the blood pricking idea.

If you’re one of the lucky people that have a dehydrator, you can take serious advantage of it by dehydrating thin slices of vegetables overnight (normally 12 hours) to get crisp, perfect vegetables that you can eat as snacks. Do this with zucchini, radish, or jicama. If you’re not lucky enough to have a dehydrator (like me), then you can easily make cheese chips in the oven and flavor them with your own spices!
While everyone needs to eat carbohydrates, some people need more carbs than others. People who are very active need to eat more carbs than people who are sedentary. Those with diabetes also usually need to limit the amount of carbohydrates they consume during each meal to help keep their blood sugar levels in check. Finally, people on low-carb diets such as the Atkins or South Beach diets may limit their carbohydrate intakes in an attempt to boost weight loss.
Purnell JQ, Hokanson JE, Marcovina SM, Steffes MW, Cleary PA, Brunzell JD. Effect of excessive weight gain with intensive therapy of type 1 diabetes on lipid levels and blood pressure: results from the DCCT. Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. JAMA. 1998;280:140–146. doi: 10.1001/jama.280.2.140. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]

Purnell JQ, Hokanson JE, Marcovina SM, Steffes MW, Cleary PA, Brunzell JD. Effect of excessive weight gain with intensive therapy of type 1 diabetes on lipid levels and blood pressure: results from the DCCT. Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. JAMA. 1998;280:140–146. doi: 10.1001/jama.280.2.140. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]


I made this bread several times now using ground flaxseed in place of the psyllium powder and it came out perfect every time. I decided to try it as a sweet bread and added 1/2 cup raisins, 1 Tbsp. cinnamon, 1/4 cup erythritol and 2 Tbsp. Splenda. After it was done I iced it with 1/2 cup powdered sugar mixed with enough milk (about 1 Tbsp. to keep it thick but a little runny. Now I have a healthy, delicious, loaf of cinnamon raisin bread. Thanks for the great recipe!
In general, people on ketogenic diets tend to consume a lot of foods high in monounsaturated and saturated fats such as olive oil, butter (often butter from grass-fed cows is recommended), avocado, and cheeses. The high oleic types of safflower and sunflower oils (but not the regular forms of these oils) are also good choices, as they are high in monounsaturated fats and low in polyunsaturated fats.
Ketosis means that your body is in a state where it doesn't have enough glucose available to use as energy, so it switches into a state where molecules called ketones are generated during fat metabolism. Ketones can be used for energy. A special property of ketones is that they can be used instead of glucose for most of the energy needed in the brain, where fatty acids can't be used. Also, some tissues of the body prefer using ketones, in that they will use them when available (for example, the heart muscle will use one ketone in particular for fuel when possible).
Well there are plenty low-carb bread options out there nowadays–we keep adding to this list of great low-carb breads–but what do you do about those pasta cravings? While a traditional slice of bread will pack 16 grams of carbs or more per slice, a serving of pasta is no joke! At 40+ grams of carbs for one cup of pasta, it is not easy on the blood sugar!
First reported in 2003, the idea of using a form of the Atkins diet to treat epilepsy came about after parents and patients discovered that the induction phase of the Atkins diet controlled seizures. The ketogenic diet team at Johns Hopkins Hospital modified the Atkins diet by removing the aim of achieving weight loss, extending the induction phase indefinitely, and specifically encouraging fat consumption. Compared with the ketogenic diet, the modified Atkins diet (MAD) places no limit on calories or protein, and the lower overall ketogenic ratio (about 1:1) does not need to be consistently maintained by all meals of the day. The MAD does not begin with a fast or with a stay in hospital and requires less dietitian support than the ketogenic diet. Carbohydrates are initially limited to 10 g per day in children or 20 g per day in adults, and are increased to 20–30 g per day after a month or so, depending on the effect on seizure control or tolerance of the restrictions. Like the ketogenic diet, the MAD requires vitamin and mineral supplements and children are carefully and periodically monitored at outpatient clinics.[48]
Hi Vivian – I am 60 yo and researching Keto and would love more information from you since we are same age. What is TDEE? What fat sources do you use and how much daily? What are some meals you make regularly and what does a day of food look like? What is the easiest/best way to count carbs getting started? If you and Brenda are ok with you giving me your email I would love to learn more from you! I just need some help getting started. Brenda – thank you for all your information and recipes!
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