I tried the original recipe and was impressed. I tweaked the recipe to create a slightly sweet, nuttier profile. Instead of 2 cups almond flour, I used 1 cup almond flour with 1 cup almond meal. Instead of 1/4 coconut oil, I used 1/4 cup unsalted butter. I reduced the psyllium husk powder to 3 level tablespoons. I also added 2 tablespoons regular molasses stirred into the warm water. The molasses has 32 grams of sugar total, but when you divided by 16 slices it only adds 2 grams of carbs per slice. Thanks for a great bread. I look forward to more great recipes!
Another new study presented at the European Society of Cardiology backs up this research and appeared with the title: “Low carbohydrate diets are unsafe and should be avoided.” Study author, Professor Maciej Banach, stated: “We found that people who consumed a low carbohydrate diet were at greater risk of premature death. Risks were also increased for individual causes of death including coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer. These diets should be avoided.”

The main limitations of our study are its small sample size, short duration, and lack of control group. That the main outcome, hemoglobin A1c, improved significantly despite the small sample size and short duration of follow-up speaks to the dramatic and consistent effect of the LCKD on glycemia. For other effects, however, such as the rises in serum LDL and HDL cholesterol, the small sample size might be the reason statistical significance was not reached. Future studies of larger samples and containing a control group are needed to better address questions about the effect of the LCKD on serum lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes.

The trick to working with coconut flour is accepting the fact that it requires a lot of eggs to give it structure and a decent consistency. It can be a little shocking to see half a dozen to a dozen eggs in a recipe, but as you try it out, you will see that it works. The end results are rarely too eggy or rubbery. You will also be surprised to see how little coconut flour is used in most recipes. It’s incredibly dense, but expands remarkably with the added eggs and liquid, so you typically only need about a third of the amount you would need with conventional flour or nut flours.
BREAKFAST BARS: You can't beat them for convenience, but choose carefully—many bars have only a gram or two of fiber, and most are loaded with added sugars, such as high-fructose corn syrup. Read the labels and look only for those that have no added sugars and at least 6 grams of fiber. Atkins® bars are a great source of fiber and are available in an array of flavors, so your taste buds can be pleasantly surprised every day of the week.
Participants were recruited from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) outpatient clinics. Inclusion criteria were age 35–75 years; body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2; and fasting serum glucose >125 mg/dL or hemoglobin A1c >6.5% without medications, or treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) and/or insulin. Exclusion criteria were evidence of renal insufficiency, liver disease, or unstable cardiovascular disease by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. All participants provided written informed consent approved by the institutional review board. No monetary incentives were provided.
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