Hi Lee, A blender might also work, if it’s powerful enough to chop up nuts. You’ll still want to use a pulse-stop-pulse method, and may need to stir between pulses. Otherwise, you can also try chopping up the nuts and seeds before mixing with the other ingredients. If you go that route, the resulting granola texture will be a little different compared to a food processor. I used a food processor partly because it makes both prep time and cleanup a lot faster, but also because that way you get a mix of larger chopped nuts and finer powder. I hope one of the other methods works out for you!
Almond flour recipes typically require more eggs and more leavening agent to help them rise properly. I also like to add a little dry protein, like whey protein powder, as I find this can help [with rising?].  Almond flour recipes may also contain less oil and liquid as well, to account for the high fat content of the nuts. In my experience, low carb, gluten-free batters are thicker than their conventional counterparts. Resist the urge to thin them out, as you may end up with a soggy mess.
The ketogenic diet achieved national media exposure in the US in October 1994, when NBC's Dateline television programme reported the case of Charlie Abrahams, son of Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams. The two-year-old suffered from epilepsy that had remained uncontrolled by mainstream and alternative therapies. Abrahams discovered a reference to the ketogenic diet in an epilepsy guide for parents and brought Charlie to John M. Freeman at Johns Hopkins Hospital, which had continued to offer the therapy. Under the diet, Charlie's epilepsy was rapidly controlled and his developmental progress resumed. This inspired Abrahams to create the Charlie Foundation to promote the diet and fund research.[10] A multicentre prospective study began in 1994, the results were presented to the American Epilepsy Society in 1996 and were published[17] in 1998. There followed an explosion of scientific interest in the diet. In 1997, Abrahams produced a TV movie, ...First Do No Harm, starring Meryl Streep, in which a young boy's intractable epilepsy is successfully treated by the ketogenic diet.[1]

Increases in cholesterol levels need discussion too. We do see temporary increases in cholesterol levels often as individuals transition onto a ketogenic diet. However, when you examine lipid particle size (a more important way to look at the cardiovascular risks), the risk pattern doesn’t seem to increase with a ketogenic diet. Harvard Health has written about lipid particle size here before: http://www.health.harvard.edu/womens-health/should-you-seek-advanced-cholesterol-testing-
Hi Paula, Sorry that you were disappointed. The color likely has to do with the brand of psyllium husk powder; some of them turn purple when baking, though this is not harmful. The brand I use is linked on the recipe card and does not turn purple (as shown in the pictures). Regarding taste and texture, I’d love to help troubleshoot, if you can describe what issue you are seeing.
If you are a coconut lover you will really love this hot cereal in the morning. This is one of the best breakfast cereals you can have, especially on a colder day, as it gets you filled up and heated up at the same time. It has a rich coconut flavor which is complemented by the vanilla and is sweet enough to satisfy a sweet tooth, and with only two grams of carbs in each serving, it is definitely low.
So glad to hear that I’m not the only one that’s not dropping pounds/inches like gangbusters…I’ve been “pretty” low carb/keto, lift twice a week and cardio 3 other days and nothing…nothing happens. I’d like to lose 10-15 pounds and just can’t seem to get anywhere…55…post menopausal. I’d say that my carbs are generally around 30 per day or less and I do IF. Love to hear your thoughts.
If you are trying to get the kids to eat healthier and not rely on sugary cereals you might find this keto one will win them over. It has a great texture from the nuts and seeds and has a sweet warming flavor from the cinnamon and sweetener. This cereal is great with your choice of milk or can be made a bit more filling by adding in some fresh berries.
Thank you! I think though many doctors and nutritionists are not keto friendly at all. They still believe in moderation and that grains are important, my own hubby’s doctor, same thing. That way of eating has failed for so many of us, even my husband. I think the keto diet is especially helpful if you’re in pre-menopausal, but that’s just my 2 cents. I’d say do more research. I’v found Dr.Jockers on youtube and Dr.Eric berg to have sound advice.
While there are many almond-flour pastas advertised as low carb, be sure to triple-check the label. Many brands contain more carbohydrates than you’d believe. Al Dente Carba Nada contains over 24 grams of total carbohydrates, or 17 grams net carbs[*]. Fiber Gourmet, also advertised as low carb, contains over 40 grams of total carbohydrates per serving and 3 grams of sugar[*].
The brain is composed of a network of neurons that transmit signals by propagating nerve impulses. The propagation of this impulse from one neuron to another is typically controlled by neurotransmitters, though there are also electrical pathways between some neurons. Neurotransmitters can inhibit impulse firing (primarily done by γ-aminobutyric acid, or GABA) or they can excite the neuron into firing (primarily done by glutamate). A neuron that releases inhibitory neurotransmitters from its terminals is called an inhibitory neuron, while one that releases excitatory neurotransmitters is an excitatory neuron. When the normal balance between inhibition and excitation is significantly disrupted in all or part of the brain, a seizure can occur. The GABA system is an important target for anticonvulsant drugs, since seizures may be discouraged by increasing GABA synthesis, decreasing its breakdown, or enhancing its effect on neurons.[7]

While there are many different types of pasta today, the classic cooked, unenriched traditional pasta is about 30 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams. That’s your entire daily carbohydrate intake on the ketogenic diet, if you’re lucky. After that comes a minuscule 0.9 grams of fat, about 6 grams of protein and minimal micronutrients. Even whole wheat pasta, advertised as a health food, contains 37 grams of total carbohydrates[*].
×