Hi Cathy, are you adapting these recipes yourself or are they already developed using coconut flour? From experience, it takes a lot of attempts to get it right (but fun too, it brings out the scientist in me). Coconut flour requires a high number of eggs for volume, thickening, protein, binding, and structure. I would be worried if there was too much avocado in there as that is just adding a soft ingredient that gives no structure. The sweet potato would add volume but unless there is enough eggs and coconut flour in the recipe, again it won’t add to the solidity of the final recipe. Psyllium I add purely to get a better crumb texture. It swells and thickens and helps bind all the other ingredients together nicely. Scones – they won’t have risen because of the lack of gluten (yay), but I quite like heavy scones as a personal choice. I started baking using recipes that had already been developed using these low-carb flours, and start by adjusting the flavours only not the ratios of the bulk ingredients. You will soon get the hang of them. Start with my flourless berry sponge, I use these ratios all-the-time! Yum.


Yes, nuts can be seen as antiinflammatory when eaten whole and in small amounts, the problem with much of low-carb baking is the huge quantity of almonds you can easily consume in just one slice of cake/pie/cookie. 1 cup almond flour = 90 almonds, and I don’t think many would sit and consume 90 almonds, but it’s easy to overeat almond baking so I am developing recipes with either almond flour or coconut flour to mix things up. This is a great article explaining why we can enjoy nuts, but be cautious of which type and how much. Nuts have become readily accessible too often and eaten it too larger quantities. Nibbling on a few isn’t going to be a problem and probably beneficial.
A common question is whether you can substitute almond flour for coconut flour and the other way around. Yes, often you can but not in equal amounts. 1 cup of almond flour can be substituted for 1/3 cup of coconut flour. 1/3 cup of coconut flour can be substituted for 2/3 cup almond flour + 1.5 tablespoons of ground psyllium husk powder. The amounts may need to be adjusted depending on what brands you’re using.
Snacking on the keto diet is a must, you need a little something to help get you through to dinner, just make sure it’s low carb. Keto meal prep can be a huge benefit because you can make low carb snacks in bulk and have them ready for the entire week, like my crispy and cheesy cauliflower tots. Bread is now a possibility for a keto diet snack, thanks to my wife's incredible keto fat bread recipe, you gotta try this for sandwiches and for schmearing on almond butter or cream cheese.
Thank you Marye for a delicious recipe. I crave noodles & this satisfies it! Also thank you for all the time and effort you put into posting your recipes. Some of the comments left are ridiculous! In my opinion, if a recipe is not something that apppeals to you then MOVE ON instead of hashing and rehashing and beating it to death. Everyone is entitled to their opinion but those comments are so annoying.Guess you do need a sense of humor huh! Lol! Thank you again!
Aude, Y., A. S, Agatston, F. Lopez-Jimenez, et al. “The National Cholesterol Education Program Diet vs a Diet Lower in Carbohydrates and Higher in Protein and Monounsaturated Fat: A Randomized Trial.” JAMA Internal Medicine 164, no. 19 (2004): 2141–46. doi: 10.1001/archinte.164.19.2141. jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/217514.

Once you start eating this very low amount of carbs, you’re body will become keto adapted. You are starving it from the carbs therefore it needs to find a source of fuel. When you’re in ketosis, your body will no longer have the carbs it once used to fuel your body. It will have to resort to using your own body fat for fuel. This is amazing because you’ll lose body fat if that was your goal and many other benefits you’ll see below.
In the 1960s, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) were found to produce more ketone bodies per unit of energy than normal dietary fats (which are mostly long-chain triglycerides).[15] MCTs are more efficiently absorbed and are rapidly transported to the liver via the hepatic portal system rather than the lymphatic system.[16] The severe carbohydrate restrictions of the classic ketogenic diet made it difficult for parents to produce palatable meals that their children would tolerate. In 1971, Peter Huttenlocher devised a ketogenic diet where about 60% of the calories came from the MCT oil, and this allowed more protein and up to three times as much carbohydrate as the classic ketogenic diet. The oil was mixed with at least twice its volume of skimmed milk, chilled, and sipped during the meal or incorporated into food. He tested it on 12 children and adolescents with intractable seizures. Most children improved in both seizure control and alertness, results that were similar to the classic ketogenic diet. Gastrointestinal upset was a problem, which led one patient to abandon the diet, but meals were easier to prepare and better accepted by the children.[15] The MCT diet replaced the classic ketogenic diet in many hospitals, though some devised diets that were a combination of the two.[10]
Hi Maya. I LOVE your site!! Interesting, informative with fab recipes and ideas. Hubby and I have just started eating low carb and I have to say, we are not finding it too difficult and I already feel sooo much better!! I find the hardest part is choosing low carb veg, I feel as if we are not eating enough. Any suggestions on how to get more veggies into our diet?
The contents displayed within this public group(s), such as text, graphics, and other material ("Content") are intended for educational purposes only. The Content is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in a public group(s).
Good morning! My first loaf of bread is in the oven. I have a couple questions though, I used unblanched almond flour is that okay? Also I used ground flax seed instead of psyllium husk as I was not able to find any. Do you need to use coconut oil or would vegetable or olive oil work? Then, I have a question about your almond flour biscuits, would that work as a biscuit topping for chicken pot pie?
Quite by coincidence I started Keto around the same time as you. I’m 48 and had been struggling with hormones. I’ve lost 10 pounds, not bragging as I had far more to lose than you. I have 2 questions. First, I’m struggling with getting all of my fat in. Never thought I’d tire of avocados. Do you have any good fat bomb recipes? I’ve tried many online and they just don’t taste good at all. Hoping with all your experience you may have some ideas. Most websites have the same recipes as others.

While everyone needs to eat carbohydrates, some people need more carbs than others. People who are very active need to eat more carbs than people who are sedentary. Those with diabetes also usually need to limit the amount of carbohydrates they consume during each meal to help keep their blood sugar levels in check. Finally, people on low-carb diets such as the Atkins or South Beach diets may limit their carbohydrate intakes in an attempt to boost weight loss.
In regard to serum measurements, the mean fasting glucose decreased by 17% from 9.08 ± 4.09 mmol/L at baseline to 7.57 ± 2.63 mmol/L at week 16 (p = 0.04) (Table ​(Table4).4). Serum sodium and chloride levels increased significantly, but only by 1% and 3%, respectively. Uric acid level decreased by 10% (p = 0.01). Serum triglyceride decreased 42% from 2.69 ± 2.87 mmol/L to 1.57 ± 1.38 mmol/L (p = 0.001). Increases occurred in both high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (8%) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (10%) but these changes were of borderline statistical significance (p = 0.08 and p = 0.1, respectively). The following blood tests did not change significantly: total cholesterol, potassium, bicarbonate, urea nitrogen, creatinine, calcium, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and hemoglobin.
Non-GMO low-carb pastas are a good option if you're concerned about the potential effects on your health of consuming genetically altered ingredients. Though there are competing views in the scientific community with regard to the long-term safety of regular GMO consumption, many choose to eat only non-GMO products as an extra-cautious measure. Similarly, organic low-carb pastas that include ingredients that haven't been treated with or exposed to chemicals are easy to find.
×