In the absence of CHO, however, the body must shift to fat as the primary energy source. In this case, the body catabolizes stored triglycerides, which exist in abundance in even the leanest individual. In effect, the KD provokes a physiological stimulus, i.e., CHO restriction, that mimics starvation. Due to the limited ability to store or produce CHO during periods of starvation, the body thus switches to ketogenesis, the production of ketone bodies as a primary fuel source (3).
Hi Linda, The carb counts on product packaging is accurate (they have to be, to abide by U.S. laws), though they are sometimes rounded down to the nearest gram. If your goal is weight loss, for some people these products can cause a stall, but others tolerate them fine. I personally avoid packaged products as they tend to be highly processed and contain artificial ingredients, but have not looked at this one specifically. We are gluten-free so don’t buy products with wheat, but I am a strong believer in each person doing what works best for them!

Klein S, Sheard NF, Pi-Sunyer S, Daly A, Wylie-Rosett J, Kulkarni K, Clark NG. Weight management through lifestyle modification for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: rationale and strategies. A statement of the American Diabetes Association, the North American Association for the Study of Obesity, and the American Society for Clinical Nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004;80:257–263. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]


My favorite sugar-free low carb BBQ sauce is a family recipe that I tweaked to make keto friendly. It is simple to prepare without a lot of added ingredients that aren’t necessary. You can find my recipe here. If you are looking for convenience, there are several brands that make a sugar-free variety that can be ordered from Amazon or you may find in your local stores. The only brand of store-bought sugar-free bbq sauce I have tried is by G. Hughes. They offer several different varieties, but I prefer hickory. I might be a little partial, but my homemade BBQ sauce makes this recipe taste much more authentic and flavorful. 

Hi Andrea, There is no added sugar in the recipe. The sweetener is natural, not fake, but it is not sugar and does not contribute any sugar. The 1g on the label comes from almond flour, which has no added sugar but almonds themselves have a tiny amount of sugars. For this recipe, make sure the chocolate you get is 100% cacao without any sugar added. Hope this helps.

Thank you! I think though many doctors and nutritionists are not keto friendly at all. They still believe in moderation and that grains are important, my own hubby’s doctor, same thing. That way of eating has failed for so many of us, even my husband. I think the keto diet is especially helpful if you’re in pre-menopausal, but that’s just my 2 cents. I’d say do more research. I’v found Dr.Jockers on youtube and Dr.Eric berg to have sound advice.
I am so excited to have found your blog. I have been doing the low carb thing myself to lose weight and get more healthy for 4 months(and it’s working really well). But once I’ve finished losing the weight, I want to maintain a lower carb lifestyle for myself and my family. But by lower, I mean maybe 50-80 net carbs a day. I want to include yeast bread on occasion, beans, etc. But I’ve been looking for a LOWER carb yeast bread. I don’t have any restrictions which would exclude gluten, dairy, meat, nuts, etc. I normally make homemade whole wheat bread for my kids from freshly ground wheat (I grind myself). Do you have any recipes that are lower carb than regular whole wheat bread, but wouldn’t necessarily be low enough to fit a 20-30 net carb/day diet. I find that making changes a little at a time works very well with a family and myself. I’d like to take a regular whole wheat bread and tweak it to lower the carbs without greatly sacrificing taste. Also need to learn more on soaking and sprouting to get past the problem of phytates & other anti-nutrients. I am totally willing to do that. Anything you can share or suggestions of recipes to try greatly appreciated! I’ve tried searching “lower carb yeast whole wheat bread” on google or including the word gluten, then I get all the gluten free vegan recipes and so forth that are really low carb, just no luck until now!
The most commonly known and used nut flour is almond flour, and it is one of the most versatile low carb ingredients. Almond flour can differ greatly between brands in terms of how finely ground it is, so you need to know what to look for. The finest almond flours are made from blanched almonds and have no darker specks of skin. Almond “meal” is often not nearly so finely ground and may or may not contain the husks of the almonds. The finer the grind of the almond flour, the finer the consistency of your baked goods. However, more coarsely ground meals are often less expensive and are still useful in things that don’t require a fine texture, such as muffins.

Several recent studies indicate that a low-carbohydrate diet is effective at improving glycemia. A few studies have shown that in non-diabetic individuals, low-carbohydrate diets were more effective than higher carbohydrate diets at improving fasting serum glucose [13,14] and insulin [6,14-16], and at improving insulin sensitivity as measured by the homeostasis model [6]. One of these studies also included diabetic patients and noted a comparative improvement in hemoglobin A1c after 6 months (low fat diet: 0.0 ± 1.0%; low carbohydrate diet: -0.6 ± 1.2%, p = 0.06) [6] and 12 months (low fat diet: -0.1 ± 1.6%; low carbohydrate diet: -0.7 ± 1.0%, p = 0.019) duration [5]. In a 5-week crossover feeding study, 8 men with type 2 diabetes had greater improvement in fasting glucose, 24-hour glucose area-under-the-curve (AUC), 24-hour insulin AUC, and glycohemoglobin while on the low-carbohydrate diet than when on a eucaloric low-fat diet [7]. In a 14-day inpatient feeding study, 10 participants with type 2 diabetes experienced improvements in hemoglobin A1c and insulin sensitivity as measured by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp method [8]. Hemoglobin A1c also improved in an outpatient study of 16 participants who followed a 20% carbohydrate diet for 24 weeks [9].
Hi Sandy, You might be able to deep fry them (haven’t tried), but you’d still have to bake them first. The batter is too thin to just straight deep fry, it wouldn’t hold together. You can make them into a different shape if you don’t have a donut pan; some people have used muffin tins. Otherwise the cheap but great donut pan I use is linked in the post above if you want to get one.
Short-term results for the LGIT indicate that at one month approximately half of the patients experience a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency, with overall figures approaching that of the ketogenic diet. The data (coming from one centre's experience with 76 children up to the year 2009) also indicate fewer side effects than the ketogenic diet and that it is better tolerated, with more palatable meals.[18][50]

To make cocoa puff balls (takes a LOT more time, but they’re REALLY fun): pinch a little thumbnail sized amount of dough and roll between your hands to form a ball. Place on the baking sheet. Bake for 8 minutes, then take baking sheet from oven and carefully move the balls around so they cook on the other side. Place bake in the oven and cook another 5 minutes. Allow to cool and enjoy!
Also, I wanted to let you know what a fabulous addition your recipes were to our Christmas. I made the orange spritz cookies which were well received by those with diabetes, my gluten free friends, and everyone! I made them Christmas Eve. Christmas morning, I made your apple coffee cake and it was fab along with eggs, sausage and fruit. Thank you so much!
When you eat foods high in carbohydrates and fat, your body naturally produces glucose. Carbohydrates are the easiest thing for the body to process, and therefore it will use them first – resulting in the excess fats to be stored immediately. In turn, this causes weight gain and health problems that are associated with high fat, high carbohydrate diets (NOT keto).
If you’re willing to use sugar alcohols, those solve the problem of missing bulk. I use a mix of 4oz xylitol, 3oz erythritol, & 1/2 tsp concentrated stevia powder (NOW brand) and it replaces 1:1 for sugar. Then for brown sugar, you take that and mix it with molasses or black strap molasses (I think 1TBSP per cup) plus maple or rum or butter extract to taste. Just mix with a fork until it’s well mixed and it will come pretty close. Hope that helps.
I am very new to this diet, but I must say I am so impressed. No snack cravings were the first surprise! I am already gluten intolerant so was bummed out to learn of all the flours that are way too high carbs especially rice flours! But already I have tried many recipes even found one made with almond flour taste just like the cheddar biscuits at red lobster! Heading out, I saw you mentioned oat fiber.. what can you use this in?
I’m new to this type of baking. My husband is borderline diabetic, so I decided to try more low card recipes, by eliminating wheat flours from our diet. I’ve tried some other bread recipes that didn’t deliver the expected results, but this one did. And its so simple to make. My husband remarked that the texture reminded him of rye bread, and asked it there was something we could add to give it more of a rye bread flavor. I did a little research and discovered that caraway seeds would do the trick. I partially ground about 2 teaspoons and soaked in warm water for a few minutes, then drained before adding it to the batter. It worked!

Hits the spot! I love traditional cereal and this definitely satisfied my tastebuds!! I will say I did realize how important it is to not over pulse, and to create a thin layer when placing in the oven. For the first few minutes I had a thick, maybe 3/4 inch layer, and I ended up thinning it out after reading reviews. I think in total I baked mine for 25-28 minutes. It was a little soft after coming out of the oven, but like you said it hardens after it cools. I added cinnamon, and wish I added more (I love a strong cinnamon flavor).
When you eat foods high in carbohydrates and fat, your body naturally produces glucose. Carbohydrates are the easiest thing for the body to process, and therefore it will use them first – resulting in the excess fats to be stored immediately. In turn, this causes weight gain and health problems that are associated with high fat, high carbohydrate diets (NOT keto). 

Participants were recruited from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) outpatient clinics. Inclusion criteria were age 35–75 years; body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2; and fasting serum glucose >125 mg/dL or hemoglobin A1c >6.5% without medications, or treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA) and/or insulin. Exclusion criteria were evidence of renal insufficiency, liver disease, or unstable cardiovascular disease by history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. All participants provided written informed consent approved by the institutional review board. No monetary incentives were provided. 
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