Hi I’m new to Keto. I have been reading about it, and understanding what to eat and what not to eat. My problem is I’m not sure if I’m doing it correctly. I’m constantly hungry whereas information reads that I will never be hungry. I use fats as required along with topping up with vegetables in my meals yet this does not fill me up. I haven’t experienced the Keto flu and I’ve even put on weight! I have been doing this for about 3 weeks now. Any ideas where I am going wrong.
So today I was sitting here getting some work done and occasionally looking out the window. The roses on the trellis are pretty actively in bloom and the trees are loaded with bright green leaves. The colors are bright against a glowery gray sky, though and it looks chilly. It’s not in the least – I think the high today is going to be 81F – BUT it LOOKS that way.
Hi Kelly, All packaged foods will have a nutrition label that list the macros per serving, including fat, protein and cabrohydrates. Net carbs, which is what most people look at for low carb and keto, are total carbs (the amount on the label) minus fiber and sugar alcohols, as explained in the article above. I have a low carb food list here that gives you a full list of all the foods you can eat, and the net carbs in each. You can also sign up above to be notified about the meal plans, which are a great way to get started.
Thank you so much for all of this great info! My husband started a Keto plan two weeks ago so I have been researching going Keto for a few weeks now. I figured I’d use him as a guinea pig to test buying food, preparing and cooking meals to see how easy or hard it would be to hit his macros for the day. I decided to start it this week (today is my fourth day) so now I am doubling up on the recipes so there’s enough for the both of us. I am still constantly looking for more recipes and trying to get more comfortable with changing up food so we are not eating the same things everyday. I can’t wait to try the meatloaf since it’s one of my favorite dishes! Thank you again for all the work you put in to sharing this info with others!
I subbed the almond flour out with homemade sunflower seed flour as I am intolerant of almonds. I also copied someone’s idea from watching a youtube video to make it more bread tasting (and smelling) and added one package of Fleischman’s Fast Active Dry Yeast and a 1/2 teaspoon sugar (which the sugar is all consumed by the yeast and helps it rise). I put in 2 whole eggs and 3 egg whites.
The granola in this product is made from all organic seeds. It’s crunchy and has a vanilla and cinnamon flavor. Egg whites are the protein ingredient for about 12 grams of protein building amino acids. At 14 total carbohydrates, 12 grams of fiber and 2 grams of net carbohydrates, this type of cereal is proven to be diabetes-friendly. It also is high protein.
My point here is that the warnings about the ketogenic principles are well taken and well documented. My concern is implications that this is a fad. I don’t use the word diet with my patients and I’m concerned that the principles behind the label and the real results that these readers have commented on might get minimized. I have found it best to encourage patients to read authors like: Stephen Phinney, Jeff Volek, Patricia Daly, and Charles Gant and the be partners with their doctors and check blood work as they move along. I am not for or against the article. If ketogenic principles offer people enduring, satisfying, and cohesive change then why not read about its potential and flexilbity?
Around this time, Bernarr Macfadden, an American exponent of physical culture, popularised the use of fasting to restore health. His disciple, the osteopathic physician Dr. Hugh William Conklin of Battle Creek, Michigan, began to treat his epilepsy patients by recommending fasting. Conklin conjectured that epileptic seizures were caused when a toxin, secreted from the Peyer's patches in the intestines, was discharged into the bloodstream. He recommended a fast lasting 18 to 25 days to allow this toxin to dissipate. Conklin probably treated hundreds of epilepsy patients with his "water diet" and boasted of a 90% cure rate in children, falling to 50% in adults. Later analysis of Conklin's case records showed 20% of his patients achieved freedom from seizures and 50% had some improvement.[10]
Hi Krystal, I haven’t tried a sweet version of this bread. Honey wouldn’t be low carb, so just keep that in mind. Adding a sweetener should work, but other ingredients would need to be adjusted. You may need a little more of the wet ingredients if using a granulated sweetener, or a little more almond flour if using a liquid sweetener. If you try adding something, let me know how it turned out for you!
This cereal, made by Nutritious Living, comes in four flavors – original, strawberry, vanilla-almond, and maple pecan – and has just six grams of net carbs per serving. These cereals also have 12 grams of protein and six grams of fiber to keep you feeling full until lunchtime. Despite the sweet-sounding flavors, Hi-Lo cereals have just one gram of sugar per serving. The cereal is made with soy grits, wheat gluten, soy protein, corn bran, rice flour, and corn meal.
You can definitely do keto without eggs. For a while I just did bulletproof coffee for breakfast which is super filling. But I have my 2 minute english muffin you might like. And my Crock pot granola is fantastic too with unsweetened almond milk. I love all veggies but I did have to cut way back in order to not go over my 20 net carbs. I just make sure to enjoy different veggies each day so I don’t feel like I’m missing out.
I was on the ketogenic diet for 6 months to support my husband, who is on it permanently for epilepsy. The diet totally messed with my hormones, which my doctor and my husband’s nutritionist sadly confirmed was a possibility. I am continuing to eat low-carb, but the ketogenic thing unfortunately seemed to work against me as a 49-year old pre-menopausal woman.
×