However, replacing high carb flours like all-purpose flour, wheat flour, corn flour, and rice flour with low-carb flour is not as simple as just using one for the other. Due to the difference in composition between high-carb and low-carb flours, you will need to use different amounts of low-carb flour together with other essential ingredients that you don’t typically find in traditional baking recipes like psyllium husk, xanthan gum, and protein powder.
Achieving ketosis is a pretty straightforward, but it can seem complicated and confusing with all of the information out there.4If you want to learn more about ketosis and the scientific process around it, you can visit a very in-depth discussion about on Dr. Peter Attia’s website. Here’s the bottom line on what you need to do, ordered in levels of importance:
Hi Shaina, I’m glad you liked it and sorry it turned out more egg-y than you wanted it. I don’t find it to be that way but for some people it might be. You may be able to substitute more egg whites for some of the eggs, but the end result would be more dense. Instead, you might want to try my new keto paleo white bread recipe. It’s light and fluffy, and has no egg yolks, so wouldn’t have an egg-y taste at all.

In many developing countries, the ketogenic diet is expensive because dairy fats and meat are more expensive than grain, fruit and vegetables. The modified Atkins diet has been proposed as a lower-cost alternative for those countries; the slightly more expensive food bill can be offset by a reduction in pharmaceutical costs if the diet is successful. The modified Atkins diet is less complex to explain and prepare and requires less support from a dietitian.[55]


Wondering what fits into a keto diet — and what doesn’t? “It’s so important to know what foods you’ll be eating before you start, and how to incorporate more fats into your diet,” says Kristen Mancinelli, RD, author of The Ketogenic Diet: A Scientifically Proven Approach to Fast, Healthy Weight Loss, who is based in New York City. We asked her for some guidelines.
In this single-arm, 4-month diet intervention, an LCKD resulted in significant improvement of glycemia, as measured by fasting glucose and hemoglobin A1c, in patients with type 2 diabetes. More importantly, this improvement was observed while diabetes medications were reduced or discontinued in 17 of the 21 participants, and were not changed in the remaining 4 participants. Participants also experienced reductions in body weight, waist circumference, and percent body fat but these improvements were moderate and did not predict the change in hemoglobin A1c in regression analyses.
I am a recent convert to using freeze-dried fruit and if you try this amazing crunchy granola you will see why. The fruit has a much more intense flavor than fresh berries and helps to add that fruity note to the nuts and coconut flakes. It also makes this cereal more child-friendly because the fruit turns the milk pink! This granola can also be formed into bars to give you a boost of energy through the day.
I don’t make pancakes often and never waffles, but I have definitely used it for the crepes A LOT. The key to the crepes is that the liquid is super thin–like cake mix, not like brownie mix. The xantham gum is really not a huge amount for the full recipe. It is under 1 TBSP per cup of other dry ingredients. Let me know if you like it better with the wheat gluten. Thanks for writing!

Flaxseed meal is the star of this recipe and with good reason. Registered Nurse Tana Amen, RN says, “Compared to other plants, flaxseed (but not oil) is extremely rich in compounds called ligands, which have antioxidant and plant estrogen properties. Flaxseed-derived ligands have been shown to reduce blood sugar and may also help combat some forms of cancer.”
Fanatic? Someone with T2D, a disease usually claimed to be progressive and a never ending stream of problems and medications, was REVERSED. That’s something to shout from the rooftops. The drop in medication use alone, but the big pharma companies would prefer that people’s stories of reversing (well, putting it into remission) T2D get called fanatical instead of insightful.
I have never made waffles with this mix as we don’t make waffles. However, I would think it would be similar to pancakes, which I have made. Did you use 1/4 cup of Xantham gum? More than this seems to make a pastier batter. When making pancakes, I found that I needed to batter to be way thicker than most pancake batters. I also found that I needed more eggs. As for what else this mix can be used for, I have recipes at the blog for cookies, cupcakes, biscuits, and crepes using this mix. I have dozens of recipes in various stages of testing that use this mix. Some of my favorites are quick breads and muffins and cookies. Cake type recipes (muffins, small loaves of bread, cupcakes, cake, etc.) really turn out well with this mix. Let me know how some other dishes turn out for you! Thanks!

I haven’t had great success converting chocolate chip cookie recipes. I think it’s because my expectations are for the cookies to taste like my daughter’s perfect, sugary-white=flour-amazing ones. And it just doesn’t happen. I do have my peanut butter cookie recipes up, and I put chocolate chips in those sometimes. Back to your question with the coconut flour. I expected to have to tweak recipes a lot more for the small amount of coconut flour in this mix, but it hasn’t been the case. Sometimes I add a little extra almond milk, but I haven’t had to increase the eggs like I thought I would have to. That said, I would start with your regular amounts and play with the dough and see. Another egg might be needed. I will be surprised if you get the original crispy/chewy texture, but please let me know if you do!!! 🙂

Sharon M. Nickols-Richardson, PhD, RD, , Mary Dean Coleman, PhD, RD, Joanne J. Volpe, Kathy W. Hosig, PhD, MPH, RD, “Perceived Hunger Is Lower and Weight Loss Is Greater in Overweight Premenopausal Women Consuming a Low-Carbohydrate/High-Protein vs High-Carbohydrate/Low-Fat Diet,” The Journal of Pediatrics: Vol 105, Issue 9: 1433–1437; September 2005. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000282230501151X.


Recently, four studies have re-examined the effect of carbohydrate restriction on type 2 diabetes. One outpatient study enrolled 54 participants with type 2 diabetes (out of 132 total participants) and found that hemoglobin A1c improved to a greater degree over one year with a low-carbohydrate diet compared with a low-fat, calorie-restricted diet [5,6]. Another study enrolled 8 men with type 2 diabetes in a 5-week crossover outpatient feeding study that tested similar diets [7]. The participants had greater improvement in glycohemoglobin while on the low-carbohydrate diet than when on a eucaloric low-fat diet. The third study was an inpatient feeding study in 10 participants with type 2 diabetes [8]. After only 14 days, hemoglobin A1c improved from 7.3% to 6.8%. In the fourth study, 16 participants with type 2 diabetes who followed a 20% carbohydrate diet had improvement of hemoglobin A1c from 8.0% to 6.6% over 24 weeks [9]. Only these latter three studies targeted glycemic control as a goal, and two of these were intensely-monitored efficacy studies in which all food was provided to participants for the duration of the study [7,8]. Three of the studies [6,8,9] mentioned that diabetic medications were adjusted but only one of them provided detailed information regarding these adjustments [9]. This information is critical for patients on medication for diabetes who initiate a low-carbohydrate diet because of the potential for adverse effects resulting from hypoglycemia.
Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
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